Why no DOMS?

Discussion in 'Female Training Discussion' started by nousername, Jun 27, 2014.

  1. dr jim

    dr jim MuscleHead

    Apr 7, 2014
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    On spot BG, but don't ask me why "they"decided to call that lowering or "negative" a "CONTRACTION".

    IMO the more appropriate term would have been the relaxation and contractile phase of muscle kinetics or motion, if preferred.

    Regs
    Jim
     
  2. IronInsanity

    IronInsanity TID Board Of Directors

    May 3, 2011
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    DOMS is no indicator of progress or gains, or lack thereof. I like the feel of it, but in 6 years I've never had DOMS once in my shoulders and they are my best BP.
     
  3. nousername

    nousername Member

    Mar 30, 2014
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    i guess I was under the impression that if u don't ever have DOMS that u weren't pushing yourself hard enough.
    Thank you for the supportive feedback.
    Just curious though. How do you guys know when your pushing enough weight? Or doing enough sets or enough different exercises?
     
  4. Gstacker

    Gstacker MuscleHead

    Aug 19, 2011
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    using percentages based of ur max and following specific training routines...
     
  5. IronInsanity

    IronInsanity TID Board Of Directors

    May 3, 2011
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    There's lots of ways to answer that... How long have you been lifting? If less than 6 months, you really have no idea how much you can lift. You can probably add 5# to the bar every week and never hit your max for months. Eventually, the bar won't move any more. Then you'll know.
     
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  6. sassy69

    sassy69 TID Lady Member

    Aug 16, 2011
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    If you're doing the same routine every week, and only small weight increases in your lifts (and this may be the norm for women since we're not built for major weight lifitng out the gate), then your body may have adapted to what you are doing. There are a million ways you can vary that if you are capped by how much weight you can lift - this includes the obvious, switching up your training routine. But to keep it simple, you could modify how you group the training that you do as well as the overall volume. Some changes you might make:

    2 muscle groups on the same day instead of 1.
    - example: back & bis, chest & tris, if you do "legs", you might break out "hams & glutes" on one day and "quads" on another, and shoulders.

    - I like doing 2 complementary muscle groups per session - but within that, you can also do a type of "active recovery" where one week you do the "first" of the 2 muscle groups as "heavy" (e.g. low rep / higher weight) and the "second" as "light" (e.g. high rep / low weight). And the next week reverse that and make the "first" your "light" and the "second" your "heavy".

    Or change up your whole routine every 6 weeks or so. Maybe incorporate some Oly lifting or yoga or whatever classes or stuff you might have available to you.

    For women, something to keep in mind while you're looking for "progress" in the gym- you do need to eat to lift if you're looking for serious gains. If you're not eating any particular way (or specifically just not getting enough calories / energy source) to support increase in lifts, then you are just going to be limited.
     
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  7. nousername

    nousername Member

    Mar 30, 2014
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    This may seem like a silly question Sassy69 but How do you know if your eating enough to make gains?
     
  8. Docd187123

    Docd187123 VIP Member

    Dec 2, 2013
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    You'll be gaining lean body mass at a rate that doesn't make you too fat quickly lol. You need to calculate your TDEE and base your dietary intake off that and what your specific goals are.
     
  9. Docd187123

    Docd187123 VIP Member

    Dec 2, 2013
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    Look up Prilepin's chart on google or buy the book on amazon. It's the single best resource I've found that gives you an optimal range of reps and sets given an intensity % of your 1RM.
     
  10. dr jim

    dr jim MuscleHead

    Apr 7, 2014
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    Although it depends upon what you mean by "gains" (strength, mass, definition, TBW etc) to some extent, the simple answer to that NOT so silly question is, you will GAIN WEIGHT (at least initially) noted as a DISPROPORTIONATE increase in LBM (Lean Body Mass).

    Regs
    Jim
     
  11. nousername

    nousername Member

    Mar 30, 2014
    55
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    OMG! Thank you so so so much
     
  12. nousername

    nousername Member

    Mar 30, 2014
    55
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    Ok thats good advice. I will try that. I did find out the other day that I was selling myself way short on the leg presses. We got a new leg press machine at my gym and I saw written on the machine that the starting weight was like 118lbs. or something like that. And on the older Incline Leg Press machine that I had been using I was only pushing the weight up to 100 to 110lbs for the max not the start. Now I see that I can push my presses (legs) up to 160 to 190 lbs. before failing at 10th to 12th rep. Now I will push five more next week. Thank you so much for the suggestions.
    Oh and I have been in gym now for about 8 or 9 months basically


     

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