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So....when did macros stop being important?

BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
1,793
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Not 100% sure what you're asking, so I'll answer a few different ways.

Complex carbs do take a big longer to absorb due to the need for the longer carbon chain to be broken. Fructose goes to the liver for conversion first while glucose is readily available. Glucose and fructose have different GLUT transporters, so a mix can be absorbed at a higher rate than simply one or the other alone.

U described the difference between an simple and complex *cough*, carb in your first statement, right?....Does the rest infer that there will be a difference in how the body will use the two different carbs?....Can one or the other be stored more easily as fat?....
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Bro Bundy

Bro Bundy

VIP Member
Nov 1, 2012
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U mean u're not the one I ALWAYS see walking around the gym with his pen/pencil and pad writing numbers down, IN BETWEEN EVERY SINGLE SET, that he somehow manages to accomplish, all the while looking at his CELL PHONE that is attached around his neck?....o_O
.
I don’t like those guys ... it’s a gym not science class .. I bet they write down when the fart too
 
CJ Smalls

CJ Smalls

Member
Aug 15, 2020
41
36
U described the difference between an simple and complex *cough*, carb in your first statement, right?....Does the rest infer that there will be a difference in how the body will use the two different carbs?....Can one or the other be stored more easily as fat?....
.
If you REALLY overload the liver with fructose, then yes that can be more easily stored as fat. But on a net basis, you'd have to be in a chronic calorie surplus for it to accumulate.

If you're in a calorie deficit, the body will pull from fat stores as needed, negating it. There is lipolysis and lipogenesis happening all day and night, we should only be concerned with the net amount.

Fructose gets converted to glucose in the liver before being released into the blood stream, and ultimately metabolized in the same processes.
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
1,793
487
If you REALLY overload the liver with fructose, then yes that can be more easily stored as fat. But on a net basis, you'd have to be in a chronic calorie surplus for it to accumulate.

If you're in a calorie deficit, the body will pull from fat stores as needed, negating it. There is lipolysis and lipogenesis happening all day and night, we should only be concerned with the net amount.

Fructose gets converted to glucose in the liver before being released into the blood stream, and ultimately metabolized in the same processes.

Excellent!....So, in the case of the liver being overloaded with fructose, would it make a difference whether the incoming carbs are either simple or complex in regards to it being stored as fat more easily?....

Like DD said earlier, u have a really good way of explaining this subject....Appreciate u stepping in and helping me!....
.
 
C

charger69

Member
Jul 4, 2017
67
48
If you REALLY overload the liver with fructose, then yes that can be more easily stored as fat. But on a net basis, you'd have to be in a chronic calorie surplus for it to accumulate.

If you're in a calorie deficit, the body will pull from fat stores as needed, negating it. There is lipolysis and lipogenesis happening all day and night, we should only be concerned with the net amount.

Fructose gets converted to glucose in the liver before being released into the blood stream, and ultimately metabolized in the same processes.
I disagree with the fat stores and think that you probably just generalized. It pulls from energy stores which could be muscle and/or fat. Whichever is easier to obtain. The body does not distinguish between muscle and fat when looking for reserves.

I have lost weight naturally and enhanced. Big difference in looks (ie muscle vs fat).


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
CJ Smalls

CJ Smalls

Member
Aug 15, 2020
41
36
Excellent!....So, in the case of the liver being overloaded with fructose, would it make a difference whether the incoming carbs are either simple or complex in regards to it being stored as fat more easily?....

Like DD said earlier, u have a really good way of explaining this subject....Appreciate u stepping in and helping me!....
.
Well both glucose are fructose are simple sugars, neither is a complex carb, which are starches. Starches are long chains of glucose, which take longer to break down into individual glucose molecules to begin the Krebs Cycle , so they're utilized more slowly than simple sugars.
 
CJ Smalls

CJ Smalls

Member
Aug 15, 2020
41
36
I disagree with the fat stores and think that you probably just generalized. It pulls from energy stores which could be muscle and/or fat. Whichever is easier to obtain. The body does not distinguish between muscle and fat when looking for reserves.

I have lost weight naturally and enhanced. Big difference in looks (ie muscle vs fat).


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
And which is the easiest macro to use for energy? Carbs, then fats, then protein bringing up the rear.

All things being equal, your body will absolutely use available carbohydrate and fatty acids for fuel before dipping into muscle tissue.

If not, it'd be a coin flip when dieting down whether you'd end up jakked or skinny fat.

But yes... When dieting to EXTREME keaness, the body just doesn't want to die, so it'll do whatever it has to do to survive.
 
testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
525
364
Excellent!....So, in the case of the liver being overloaded with fructose, would it make a difference whether the incoming carbs are either simple or complex in regards to it being stored as fat more easily?....
Like DD said earlier, u have a really good way of explaining this subject....Appreciate u stepping in and helping me!....
.
Fructose spills over into fat more easily via de novo lipogenesis (triglycerides and others) because it has to process through the liver. Max fructose per day that MOST can handle before issues begin to arise is about 40g.
A MAJOR culprit in overweight and obesity (besides seed oils)… and health consequences in general, is high fructose corn syrup that’s in so many products.
 
CJ Smalls

CJ Smalls

Member
Aug 15, 2020
41
36
Fructose spills over into fat more easily via de novo lipogenesis (triglycerides and others) because it has to process through the liver. Max fructose per day that MOST can handle before issues begin to arise is about 40g.
A MAJOR culprit in overweight and obesity… and health consequences in general, besides seed oils, is high fructose corn syrup that’s in so many products.
I've always that it was about 100g, but I could be mistaken.

Just looked, found a meta on this.. "Fructose consumption and consequences for glycation, plasma triacylglycerol, and body weight: meta-analyses and meta-regression models of intervention studies | The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Oxford Academic" https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/88/5/1419/4648852
 
testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
525
364
I've always that it was about 100g, but I could be mistaken.
That’s the often cited amount by the establishment — but like most other matters of nutrition, they’re way off.
 
testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
525
364
I've always that it was about 100g, but I could be mistaken.
Thomas Delauer — you familiar with him off hand? He’s pretty decent on research and info, does a nice breakdown here.
 
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