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Semaglutide

Jrod

Jrod

Member
Jun 30, 2022
86
48
Are you using pharm grade or non pharm grade semaglutide?
How much does this cost?
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 21, 2011
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2,575

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Original Investigation
Nutrition, Obesity, and Exercise
September 19, 2022

Weight Loss Outcomes Associated With Semaglutide Treatment for Patients With Overweight or Obesity​

JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5(9):e2231982. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.31982


Key Points
Question Is treatment with semaglutide associated with weight loss outcomes similar to those seen in results of randomized clinical trials?

Findings In this cohort study of 175 patients with overweight or obesity, the total body weight loss percentages achieved were 5.9% at 3 months and 10.9% at 6 months.

Meaning Semaglutide treatment in a regular clinical setting was associated with weight loss similar to that seen in randomized clinical trials, which suggests its applicability for treating patients with overweight or obesity.

********************

Abstract

Importance
No retrospective cohort study has assessed the effectiveness of semaglutide at doses used in randomized clinical trials to treat obesity (ie, 1.7 and 2.4 mg).

Objective To study weight loss outcomes associated with semaglutide treatment at doses used in randomized clinical trials for patients with overweight or obesity.

Design, Setting, and Participants This cohort study, conducted at a referral center for weight management, retrospectively collected data on the use of semaglutide for adults with overweight or obesity between January 1, 2021, and March 15, 2022, with a follow-up of up to 6 months. A total of 408 patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 27 or more were prescribed weekly semaglutide subcutaneous injections for 3 months or more. Patients with a history of bariatric procedures, taking other antiobesity medications, and with an active malignant neoplasm were excluded.

Exposures Weekly 1.7-mg or 2.4-mg semaglutide subcutaneous injections for 3 to 6 months.

Main Outcomes and Measures The primary end point was the percentage of weight loss. Secondary end points were the proportion of patients achieving weight loss of 5% or more, 10% or more, 15% or more, and 20% or more after 3 and 6 months and the percentage of weight loss for patients with or without type 2 diabetes after 3 and 6 months.

Results The study included 175 patients (132 women [75.4%]; mean [SD] age, 49.3 [12.5] years; mean [SD] BMI, 41.3 [9.1]) in the analysis at 3 months and 102 patients at 6 months. The mean (SD) weight loss after 3 months was 6.7 (4.4) kg, equivalent to a mean (SD) weight loss of 5.9% (3.7%) (P < .001), and the mean (SD) weight loss after 6 months was 12.3 (6.6) kg, equivalent to a mean (SD) weight loss of 10.9% (5.8%) (P < .001 from baseline). Of the 102 patients who were followed up at 6 months, 89 (87.3%) achieved weight loss of 5% or more, 56 (54.9%) achieved weight loss of 10% or more, 24 (23.5%) achieved weight loss of 15% or more, and 8 (7.8%) achieved weight loss of 20% or more. Patients with type 2 diabetes had a lower mean (SD) percentage weight loss at 3 and 6 months compared with those without type 2 diabetes: 3.9% (3.1%) vs 6.3% (3.7%) at 3 months (P = .001) and 7.2% (6.3%) vs 11.8% (5.3%) at 6 months (P = .005).

Conclusions and Relevance The results of this cohort study suggest that weekly 1.7-mg and 2.4-mg doses of semaglutide were associated with weight loss similar to that seen in randomized clinical trials. Studies with longer periods of follow-up are needed to evaluate prolonged weight loss outcomes.
 
Lil Ed

Lil Ed

VIP Member
Jul 15, 2011
790
1,066
Conclusions and Relevance The results of this cohort study suggest that weekly 1.7-mg and 2.4-mg doses of semaglutide were associated with weight loss similar to that seen in randomized clinical trials. Studies with longer periods of follow-up are needed to evaluate prolonged weight loss outcomes.

Isnt that a bit much per week? 1.7 to 2.4mg
 
Wallyd

Wallyd

VIP Member
Dec 10, 2013
1,344
996
Conclusions and Relevance The results of this cohort study suggest that weekly 1.7-mg and 2.4-mg doses of semaglutide were associated with weight loss similar to that seen in randomized clinical trials. Studies with longer periods of follow-up are needed to evaluate prolonged weight loss outcomes.

Isnt that a bit much per week? 1.7 to 2.4mg
From all the research I did, before helping my gal find some at a reasonable cost, 2.4 is the max dose & that starts after building up the dose for 20 weeks.
 
lifter6973

lifter6973

Senior Member
Jul 3, 2021
217
136
From all the research I did, before helping my gal find some at a reasonable cost, 2.4 is the max dose & that starts after building up the dose for 20 weeks.
Correct, with Wegovy for instance, you start at 0.5 mg a week and eventually work your way up to 2.4 mg a week. Good luck getting sema legit though. Novo Nordisc is not supplying starter doses (1 ml 0.5 mg pins a week) at least until January 2024 now. They are focused on people who are already on higher doses due to short supply.

Same goes for Ozempic, both are made by Novo Nordisc. The are both sema, its just Ozempic is a much lower dose and labeled for diabetics or pre-diabetics. Wegovy is higher dose and specified for obesity. Novo Nordisc introduced Wegovy after they found how much Ozempic was being prescribed off label for weight loss.

God help anyone who actually starts at a legit 2.4 mg. You will likely shit your pants and may even vomit. You def won't feel very good.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 21, 2011
2,520
2,575

Semaglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Obesity without Diabetes​

December 14, 2023
N Engl J Med 2023; 389:2221-2232
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa2307563

Abstract​

BACKGROUND​

Semaglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, has been shown to reduce the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes. Whether semaglutide can reduce cardiovascular risk associated with overweight and obesity in the absence of diabetes is unknown.

METHODS​

In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, event-driven superiority trial, we enrolled patients 45 years of age or older who had preexisting cardiovascular disease and a body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of 27 or greater but no history of diabetes. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive once-weekly subcutaneous semaglutide at a dose of 2.4 mg or placebo. The primary cardiovascular end point was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke in a time-to-first-event analysis. Safety was also assessed.

RESULTS​

A total of 17,604 patients were enrolled; 8803 were assigned to receive semaglutide and 8801 to receive placebo. The mean (±SD) duration of exposure to semaglutide or placebo was 34.2±13.7 months, and the mean duration of follow-up was 39.8±9.4 months. A primary cardiovascular end-point event occurred in 569 of the 8803 patients (6.5%) in the semaglutide group and in 701 of the 8801 patients (8.0%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.72 to 0.90; P<0.001). Adverse events leading to permanent discontinuation of the trial product occurred in 1461 patients (16.6%) in the semaglutide group and 718 patients (8.2%) in the placebo group (P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS​

In patients with preexisting cardiovascular disease and overweight or obesity but without diabetes, weekly subcutaneous semaglutide at a dose of 2.4 mg was superior to placebo in reducing the incidence of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke at a mean follow-up of 39.8 months. (Funded by Novo Nordisk; SELECT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03574597. opens in new tab.)
 
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