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Semaglutide

MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

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Sep 21, 2011
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Key takeaways:​

  • Of the cohort, 65% lost at least 10% of their body weight and 41% lost at least 15% of their body weight.
  • Half of patients reported at least one adverse event, with nausea the most common.
Adults with overweight or obesity receiving semaglutide lost 13.4% of their body weight at 1 year, according to findings from a real-world study presented at the European Congress on Obesity.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

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Sep 21, 2011
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Where did you see this? Was it a research paper? I'd like to look into this.
Hey Wilson! I believe I actually got this from a Liraglutide study, but since they are both GLP-1 agonists, I assumed (maybe a bad thing) that they would have identical effects (Lira and Semaglutide). I just glanced through the abstact though as I was just looking for a quick answer to the post. Here is the study I took it from. I'm glad you asked so I can actually post it up for reference for the future:)


Abstract​


Aim​

To investigate the effects of liraglutide treatment on glycaemic control and adipose tissue metabolism in overweight and obese people with type 1 diabetes (T1DM).

Research design and methods​

A total of 84 adult overweight and obese patients with T1DM, with no detectable C-peptide, were randomized (1:1) to either placebo or 1.8 mg/d liraglutide for 6 months. Blood samples were collected at 0, 12 and 26 weeks. Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies, a high-calorie high-fat meal challenge test, continuous glucose monitoring, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and MRI were performed before and at the end of treatment.

Results​

In all, 37 and 27 patients who received liraglutide and placebo, respectively, completed the study. Glycated haemoglobin fell by 0.41 ± 0.18% (4.5±1.4 mmol/mol) from baseline after liraglutide treatment (P = 0.001), and by 0.29 ± 0.19% (3.1±2.0 mmol/mol) compared to placebo (P = 0.1). There was no increase in hypoglycaemia, while the time spent in normal glycaemia increased (P = 0.015) and time spent in hyperglycaemia decreased (P = 0.019). Body weight fell significantly in the liraglutide group, mostly in the form of fat mass loss (including visceral fat), with no change in lean mass. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) also fell after liraglutide treatment. Liraglutide also caused a significant increase in the expression of adipose tissue triglyceride lipase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α, PPARδ, uncoupling protein-2 and type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase in the adipose tissue.

Conclusions​

Liraglutide improves glycaemia, reduces adiposity and SBP. Liraglutide also stimulates mechanisms involved with an increase in lipid oxidation and thermogenesis, while conserving lean body mass.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

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Sep 21, 2011
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Gut hormone-based pharmacology: novel formulations and future possibilities for metabolic disease therapy​

Diabetologia (2023)

Abstract​

Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are established pharmaceutical therapies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. They mimic the action of GLP-1 to reduce glucose levels through stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon secretion. They also reduce body weight by inducing satiety through central actions. The GLP-1 receptor agonists used clinically are based on exendin-4 and native GLP-1 and are available as formulations for daily or weekly s.c. or oral administration. GLP-1 receptor agonism is also achieved by inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), which prevent the inactivation of GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), thereby prolonging their raised levels after meal ingestion. Other developments in GLP-1 receptor agonism include the formation of small orally available agonists and compounds with the potential to pharmaceutically stimulate GLP-1 secretion from the gut. In addition, GLP-1/glucagon and GLP-1/GIP dual receptor agonists and GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triple receptor agonists have shown the potential to reduce blood glucose levels and body weight through their effects on islets and peripheral tissues, improving beta cell function and stimulating energy expenditure. This review summarizes developments in gut hormone-based therapies and presents the future outlook for their use in type 2 diabetes and obesity.
 
CFM

CFM

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My friend is running SGT and experiencing moderate to severe injection site issues. She an RN, given hundreds, if not thoussands of injections over many decades..........

What are you all using to make the puck a injectable solution?
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Dec 25, 2010
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My friend is running SGT and experiencing moderate to severe injection site issues. She an RN, given hundreds, if not thoussands of injections over many decades..........

What are you all using to make the puck a injectable solution?
I use bacteriostatic water, the exact same stuff I use to reconstitute my GH. That's strange. I haven't had any injection site issues at all.
 
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CFM

CFM

National Breast Implant Awareness Month Squeezer
Mar 18, 2012
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I use bacteriostatic water, the exact same stuff I use to reconstitute my GH. That's strange. I haven't had any injection site issues at all.
I am using HCG, she is using SGT. We are both having site issues using the same brand BAC water................
 
beefnewton

beefnewton

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Nov 11, 2022
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I'm looking back at pics from February, and I was lean as hell. So now I'm wondering if Semaglutide was really helping shed the last bit of fat... or it was my DNP run, which I had considered somewhat of a failure at the time. I had only trace amounts of love handles left, but now I've got full-on muffin top back on my trunk. Lower back is the worst. I was looking good at the time and didn't even really appreciate it.
 
Thrawn

Thrawn

MuscleHead
Jun 12, 2023
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I've consider doing the every 2 to 3 nights and see what changes I'm going to try and tough it out until my next blood work in 3 months to see if there's any change one way or the other. At that point I'll probably go ahead if I have to start making some adjustments to my acid reflux regimen so to speak. I found that Ginger root helps a lot. If it gets really bad I do some baking soda but I have to be careful of that because I have high blood pressure and extra sodium is definitely not good for me.


I have dealt with heartburn my whole life honestly I remember even as a teenager having to eat rolaids but I also grew up in a very traumatic environment which I'm sure probably did not help any. Just sucks to have to be careful what I eat some things are way worse acidic foods make it worse spicy foods make it worse but I can have oatmeal and get terrible heartburn it's ridiculous.


I'm going through two more blood donations so in about 120 days I'm going to retest my hematocrit was way up I hadn't given blood in about a year and I'm making some changes my cholesterol was off a bit but that was due to some sloppy eating. That's all back on track and has been since my blood work. I like to see those numbers look a lot better.

I definitely appreciate the feedback. I think we're all going through the same thing as we age things change and we need as much information as we can get to make better choices
What is your blood type? Have you been scoped for ulcers?
 
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