Mediterranean diet

Discussion in 'General Weight Loss Discussion' started by guss, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. BrotherIron

    BrotherIron TID Board Of Directors

    Mar 6, 2011
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    I don't speak it well but I do speak it a bit. I understand conversations when someone's speaking to me. I'm thinking of starting to go to Sunday school and learn it better. There's a very large Leb community where we live so I could go to church on Sunday and take the class they have to learn the language.
     
  2. Docd187123

    Docd187123 VIP Member

    Dec 2, 2013
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    Thats quite impressive Brother Iron. If English is your first language, Arabic is tough to pick up bc there are sounds in Arabic never made in English. Maybe we should take this to PM so as not to continue hijacking the thread lol
     
  3. Rein

    Rein VIP Member

    Sep 10, 2010
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    Most of people in the Greek islands consume large quantities of fish, octapus, legumes, whole wheats, veggies, eggs, olive oil and fruits but also like their alchohol (in some islands like Crete) and I am not talking just for red wine or 1-2 glasses per day. They eat mostly lamb or goat and chicken and less often beef. Yogurt also has a special place in the diet but milk not so much.

    People used to eat meat less often a few decades back (chicken two-three times per week) and beef only once per month.
     
  4. DLTH

    DLTH VIP Member

    Oct 30, 2011
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    So this diet consists of basically eating healthy foods?
     
  5. Rein

    Rein VIP Member

    Sep 10, 2010
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  6. BrotherIron

    BrotherIron TID Board Of Directors

    Mar 6, 2011
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    Yes, I have a very difficult time pronouncing some of the consonants b/c English is my first lang. English is my wife's 4th lang.
     
  7. BrotherIron

    BrotherIron TID Board Of Directors

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    lol...........
     
  8. ItalianMuscle

    ItalianMuscle Drama Queen senior Vip

    Sep 1, 2010
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    I am not sure what its called. They bring some out at the arabic restaurants I go to. You dip your bread, chicken, etc in it. All I know, its good as ****, and I usually dont go out for a few days. I reek of garlic... But its worth it!
    Raw kibbie is great too. You ****ers have me wanting some, and I cant because of my diet.. lol
     
  9. Docd187123

    Docd187123 VIP Member

    Dec 2, 2013
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    Check your PMs brother. Let me know which method you want to make it and I'll send the recipe to you or post it here for everyone.

    Brother Iron is correct, it's called Toum or Toom which literally translated in English means garlic. It works through emulsification which makes it more of a pasty consistency than a liquid or solid. I find it goes amazing with the rotisserie chickens you can get at the supermarket (pick the chicken from the bone, put it in some pita bread with the toum, and some veggies like lettuce and tomatoes and you have yourself a delicious and healthy sand which lol), chicken shish tawouk, any kind of kibbee, steaks and burgers, and even tried it wih deli meats. My uncle mentioned he uses it as a substitute for mayo in some recipes so I tried it with tuna fish. IF YOU DO THIS BE PREPARED FOR SOME KICKING BREATH LOL.

    Let me know if there are more recipes I or Brother Iron possibly can hook you up with. I'm a fatass at heart and love food talk and sharing recipes lmao.
     
  10. BrotherIron

    BrotherIron TID Board Of Directors

    Mar 6, 2011
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    I would literally move to Lebanon for the food.

    I'm no good at preparing any Leb dishes but I can get some recipes.
     
  11. Docd187123

    Docd187123 VIP Member

    Dec 2, 2013
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    X1,345,983,628


    the food alone is out of this world. A few of my dad's cousins over there own small restaurants and delis so food is never a problem when we go. There was also this one restaurant we went to, forgot the name and location, but was up on the side of the mountains. In the middle of the restaurant there was like big slab of rock shaped like a gigantic cube with many pipes coming out of it. As the snow and ice melted from the mountains it traveled down through specially built pipes into the middle of the restaurant. The waiters would fill pitchers of water from it and serve you with them. Purest tasting water I remember having in my life. The water was so cold I remember one of the waiters put a watermelon under the water coming from a pipe and it cracked the watermelon open.
     
  12. Docd187123

    Docd187123 VIP Member

    Dec 2, 2013
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    The issue I have with explaining how to make Leb dishes is that my grandmother, mother, and uncle all taught me how to cook without using measurements. Going by eye and taste. So im
    nog always exactly sure of the quantity of such and such ingredient in a dish but I know how it's supposed to taste and add ingredients accordingly. I guess I could estimate them and you could just tweak it to your own tastes
     

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