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beefnewton

beefnewton

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FD would like this one, as it would describe the action of "docking." "Meeting at the ends."

Example: FD likes posting animated GIF's of coterminous men.
 
jipped genes

jipped genes

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Oct 22, 2022
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Today's word is:

coterminous

pronounced: koh-TUHR-muh-nuhs

This word is an adjective that has a couple, somewhat related meanings:
1. Having the same or coincident boundaries.
2. Meeting at the ends.
3. Contained within the same boundaries.
4. Having the same scope, meaning, extent, etc.: synonymous.

From Latin con- (with) + terminus (boundary). Earliest documented use: 1799.

This word makes sense to me. Almost sounds like its meaning in one respect. Now I need to find an opportunity to use the word in real life....

I knew this one as coterminous is an old legal term used to describe a landmark within a plot of land. I have used it 2 times in almost 30 years in my job.
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Dec 25, 2010
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Today's word is:

balsam

Pronounced BAWL-suhm

This word is a noun that means:
1. Something that soothes or heals.
2. An aromatic resinous substance from certain trees and plants.
3. A preparation, for example an ointment, made with such a substance.
4. Such a tree or a plant.

From Latin balsamum, from Greek balsamon, of Semitic origin. Earliest documented use: before 1150.

This word is a bit confusing to me, as I immediately think of the word "balm", which sounds similar and seems to have the same meaning. Makes me think they're simply interchangable and different people have different preferences. Why use a less common word unless it provides better accuracy or clarity in what you're trying to convey?


 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Today's word is:

exultation

pronounced: eg-zuhl-TAY-shuhn

This word is a noun that means the act or state of triumphant joy.

From Latin exsultare (to exult, to leap up), from ex- (out) + saltare (to leap), frequentative of salire (to leap). Earliest documented use: 1425.

That's what happens in the Dawg Pound when the Browns win the Super Bowl. Wait... forget it.
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Today's word is:

balderdash

Pronounced: BAWL-duhr-dash

This word is a noun that means nonsense. Typically used in a pejorative manner.

Origin unknown. Earliest documented use: 1596.

It's funny that this is a more common word that people actually use, and yet its origin is unknown. Go figure.
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Today's word is:

amiable

pronounced AY-mee-uh-buhl

I don't pronounce it that way. I usually hear it as "short A" A-mee-uh-buhl rather than a long A sound. But both are correct.

This word is an adjective and means pleasant or friendly.

From Latin amicus (friend), which also gave us amity, amicus curiae, amigo inimical and enemy. Earliest documented use: 1375.

Most of us know this word pretty well, and even will use it in general conversation. Interesting how some words can be a root for its antonym, like in this case "enemy." I learned something new today!
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Today's word is:

palooka

Pronounced: puh-LOOK-uh

This word is a noun and means:
1. Someone incompetent or inexperienced, especially as a boxer.
2. A clumsy or foolish person.

Of unknown origin. The word was popularized by the comic strip Joe Palooka which debuted in 1930. Earliest documented use: 1920.

This word is a fairly recent word, but also went out of style fast. You never hear some called a "palooka" anymore, and if you did here it, it would have a throw-back reference to yesterday. Kind of, back in the days of black and white television. Likely to hear this word in an episode of "Little Rascals."
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Today's word is:

lycanthropy

pronounced: ly-KAN-thruh-pee

This word is a noun and means:
1. A delusion that one has transformed into a wolf.
2. The process of or ability to transform into a wolf.

From Greek lykos (wolf) + -anthropy (human). Earliest documented use: 1584.

Have no plans to use this word in a sentence anytime soon. Maybe if I'm ever a contestant on Jeopardy! LOL
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Today's word is:

heliophobia

pronounced: hee-lee-uh-FO-bee-uh

This word is a noun that means fear of sunlight or bright light.

From Greek helio- (sun) + -phobia (fear). Earliest documented use: 1885.

This word makes sense from its root "helio." As in heliocentric theory of the solar system, where the sun is at the center.
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Dec 25, 2010
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Today is an interesting word that has two alternate spellings and pronunciations:

sciamachy OR sciomachy

Pronounced:

sy-AM-uh-kee OR sky-AM-uh-kee

This word is a noun that means a mock fight or a fight with an imaginary enemy. Makes me think of all the Internet cage fighter tough guys, LOL.

From Greek skiamachia, from skia (shadow) + -machia (battle). Earliest documented use: 1623.
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Today's word is:

cracker-barrel

Pronounced: KRAK-uhr bar-uhl

The word is an adjective and means plain, rustic, homespun, direct, or unsophisticated.

From cracker (wafer), from crack, from Old English cracian (to resound) + barrel, from Old French baril, from Latin barriclus (small cask). Earliest documented use: 1877.

History:
Cracker barrels were barrels containing loose crackers (thin crisp biscuits or wafers). Customers would fill a bag to buy however much they needed. The empty barrels were often used as tables or stations around which people gathered to trade gossip. The term evolved to mean plain, rustic, or unsophisticated, alluding to the old-style country stores where these conversations took place.
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

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Dec 25, 2010
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Today's word is:

lickety-split

Pronounced: lik-uh-tee-SPLIT

This word is an adverb that means "at great speed."

A fanciful formation from lick (fast) + split. Earliest documented use: 1859.

I never knew this was a real word. Just figured it was an informal figure of speech. A fairly recent word.
 
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