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types of abscesses, septic and sterile

SHINE

SHINE

MuscleHead
Oct 11, 2010
5,047
599
#1
Article below Taken from the Med book, Fact is An Abscess can occur for various reasons. Most of time the abscess is do to being unsanitary or bad injecting techniques or using the same injection sight to often. And sometimes yes it is do to dirty AAS injects that are not prepared properly in unsanitary condtitions. IMO I would always keep a broad spectrum antibiotic on hand for theese reasons.
An infection turning into celluitus will most likely put you in the hospital needing surgery to drain it and even worse Necrotizing fasciitis. I've seen the Necrotizing fasciitis first hand happen to a guy,it ate half of his muscle and skin off of his damn legg with a scar that looks like a bad burn victim. This type of inffection spreads faster than any other and were talking hours not days.
Necrotizing fasciitis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Abscess
Definition
An abscess is an enclosed collection of liquefied tissue, known as pus, somewhere in the body. It is the result of the body's defensive reaction to foreign material.
Description
There are two types of abscesses, septic and sterile. Most abscesses are septic, which means that they are the result of an infection. Septic abscesses can occur anywhere in the body. Only a germ and the body's immune response are required. In response to the invading germ, white blood cells gather at the infected site and begin producing chemicals called enzymes that attack the germ by digesting it. These enzymes act like acid, killing the germs and breaking them down into small pieces that can be picked up by the circulation and eliminated from the body. Unfortunately, these chemicals also digest body tissues. In most cases, the germ produces similar chemicals. The result is a thick, yellow liquid—pus—containing digested germs, digested tissue, white blood cells, and enzymes.
An abscess is the last stage of a tissue infection that begins with a process called inflammation. Initially, as the invading germ activates the body's immune system, several events occur:
Blood flow to the area increases.
The temperature of the area increases due to the increased blood supply.
The area swells due to the accumulation of water, blood, and other liquids.
It turns red.
It hurts, because of the irritation from the swelling and the chemical activity.
These four signs—heat, swelling, redness, and pain—characterize inflammation.
As the process progresses, the tissue begins to turn to liquid, and an abscess forms. It is the nature of an abscess to spread as the chemical digestion liquefies more and more tissue. Furthermore, the spreading follows the path of least resistance—the tissues most easily digested. A good example is an abscess just beneath the skin. It most easily continues along beneath the skin rather than working its way through the skin where it could drain its toxic contents. The contents of the abscess also leak into the general circulation and produce symptoms just like any other infection. These include chills, fever, aching, and general discomfort.
Sterile abscesses are sometimes a milder form of the same process caused not by germs but by nonliving irritants such as drugs. A sterile abscess may cause only a painful lump deep in the buttock where a shot was given.
If an injected drug like penicillin is not absorbed, it stays where it was injected and may cause enough irritation to generate a sterile abscess—sterile because there is no infection involved. Sterile abscesses are quite likely to turn into hard, solid lumps as they scar, rather than remaining pockets of pus.
Be safe people,
peace.
 
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PillarofBalance

PillarofBalance

Strength Pimp
Staff Member
Feb 27, 2011
17,069
4,628
#3
Awesome post bro! ATW what kind of anti-biotic should be on hand... Would a z-pack do?
 
Rottenrogue

Rottenrogue

Strongwoman
Jan 26, 2011
6,550
1,836
#6
Curious.I have heard of people going to the pet store for fish antibiotics.It escapes me what the name is. Now I know you can go to a feed store and get injectable penicillin but would fish antibiotics suffice also?

I have no intention of doing do.If I ever got an abcess I wouldn't screw around.i would go to my doc and tell him it was a vitamin B shot and must have gotten infected.
 
AllTheWay

AllTheWay

TID Lady Member
Mar 17, 2011
4,240
411
#7
generally fish abx are tetracycline based and no, it wouldnt be enough. the injectable pen from the feed store would be better for you. i have tons of clients that inject themselves with it!
 
M

myosin

VIP Member
May 27, 2011
330
112
#8
Good stuff ATL... If I can add- if u r a health care worker, the preferred oral abx would be clindamycin d/t the chance of having MRSA and not knowing it.
 
SHINE

SHINE

MuscleHead
Oct 11, 2010
5,047
599
#9
Good stuff ATL... If I can add- if u r a health care worker, the preferred oral abx would be clindamycin d/t the chance of having MRSA and not knowing it.
Good advice for sure, thanks for mentioning this.
Cases of MRSA are realy getting bad in the hospitals theese days. Although the majority are CA-MRSA alot of the even worse HA-MRSA are showing up as well.
 
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AllTheWay

AllTheWay

TID Lady Member
Mar 17, 2011
4,240
411
#10
Good stuff ATW... If I can add- if u r a health care worker, the preferred oral abx would be clindamycin d/t the chance of having MRSA and not knowing it.
doxycycline is also a treatment for MRSA and is easy to get. although for standard infections i wouldnt make these the first line of abx that one chooses.
 
M

myosin

VIP Member
May 27, 2011
330
112
#11
doxycycline is also a treatment for MRSA and is easy to get. although for standard infections i wouldnt make these the first line of abx that one chooses.
For me, I just take the "better safe than sorry" route... I'm an ICU nurse, so I'm around MRSA+ patients constantly. The two times I had an abscess, even without my suggesting it, the Attending wrote for Clinda for me... but, I hear you, Clinda can be HARSH on the lower GI system :(
 
apollo

apollo

MuscleHead
Jun 15, 2011
284
50
#12
Hey SHINE- me and deadweight inspired you did'nt we? lol!
Septic abcesses are why true aseptic technique is so important in making gear. Which VERY FEW sources even know- much less use. I want go into polutants nor contaminates found in air and filthy chinese raws but it's important to realize BA is bacteriostatic not bacterioscidal and to know the diifference. Air should never touch gear in aseptic liquid transfer and if it does(as in 99.% of UG labs- the air should be clean through hepa filtration- which it is'nt in 99% of UG sources regardless of flow hood claims.
As far as abcesses go- the other kind (sterile) is where proper formulation is needed and why it is important but that is usually the easier part.
For the consumer it is better to stick with lower to moderate dosed gear and avoid not only a higher chance of sterile abcesses but those harsh solvents and co-solvents.
Very nice post by the way broham : )
 
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