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The 6 Snacks You Should Eat Every Day

Lizard King

Lizard King

Administrator
Staff Member
Sep 9, 2010
11,548
3,356
#1
And I was hoping it would say M&M's were better for you then almonds, maybe next issue...


By David Zinczenko with Matt Goulding

The 6 Snacks You Should Eat Every Day

"I eat healthy, and I don't snack between meals; why can't I lose any weight?"

A colleague—I'll call her Mary—was in my office recently, complaining about her body with just those words. I listened, nodding sympathetically, because I couldn't speak—I had a mouth full of almonds and was washing them down with chocolate milk. Mary stared at me as though I'd just backed over her dachshund. "You eat all the time, and you never gain weight!" she exclaimed. "What, is there a picture in your attic that gets fatter while you stay thin?"

"I never gain weight because I eat all the time," I explained, reaching for a napkin. "Not snacking is exactly the wrong thing to do!"

Our bodies evolved to graze; when food gets scarce, we start to retain fat as a way of protecting ourselves from famine. "That's exactly what happens when you don't snack between meals," I told her. "Your body doesn't know where its next meal is coming from, so it's afraid to shed the extra pounds." Worse, you wind up eating more than you need at every meal.

That's why snacking is so important: In fact, when Penn State researchers fed subjects just one humble apple before mealtime, the subjects consumed nearly 190 fewer calories. That's part of the reason why, when laying out the eating strategy for the new Eat This, Not That No-Diet Diet!, I included two snacks per day, every day.

Think of it this way: The more you eat, the more you lose. Sounds great, right? But you need to snack smartly, and stock your kitchen with the nibbles on this list.

Fage yogurt1. BEST YOGURT
Fage Total 2% Plain Greek Yogurt (7 oz container)
130 calories
4 g fat (3 g saturated)
17 g protein
8 g sugars

Yogurt is teeming with calcium, which promotes muscle growth; and probiotic bacteria, which bolsters your immune system. What's more, study participants who ate yogurt daily lost 81 percent more belly fat than those who didn't, according to a study published in the International Journal of Obesity. So why Greek? Because the Greek stuff has more than double the protein of standard American-style yogurt-and far less sugar. Want to make it even healthier? Add a few berries along with some nuts or seeds.

Not That!
Dannon Fruit on the Bottom Strawberry (6 oz container)
150 calories
1.5 g fat (1 g saturated)
6 g protein
26 g sugars

DID YOU KNOW? Sleepy women eat an extra 328 calories per day, according a new study from the New York Obesity Research Center. Discover more shocking health, nutrition, and weight loss secrets like this by following me on Twitter right here (where I'm giving a FREE iPad2 to a lucky follower) or by signing up for our FREE Eat This, Not That! newsletter.

Almonds2. BEST FINGER FOOD
Almonds (1 oz)
163 calories
14 g fat (1 g saturated)
6 g protein
3.5 g fiber

Almonds are an excellent source of heart-healthy monosaturated fats, and, pound for pound, a better source of protein than eggs. That's part of the reason why research published in the journal Obesity demonstrated that people who frequently eat nuts are less likely to gain weight. Just be sure to eat them whole: A study from the Journal of Nutrition found that the flavonoids in the skin combine with the vitamin E in the nut to double the antioxidant dose.

Not That!
Original M&Ms (1 serving, 1.7 oz)
240 calories
10 g fat (6 g saturated)
31 g sugars
2 g protein
1 g fiber

Bonus Tip: The right breakfast will jumpstart your metabolism and have you burning more calories throughout the day. The wrong one will fill you up with empty calories and an entire day’s worth of fat, sugar, and salt. Make sure you consult this shocking list of the 20 Worst Breakfasts in America.

3. BEST CEREAL Kashi GoLean
Kashi GoLean Original (1 cup with 1/2 cup of 1% milk)
195 calories
2.5 g fat (.5 g saturated)
12 g sugars
17 g protein
10 g fiber

You know how you're not supposed to judge a book by its cover? Well the same rule applies to cereal. Some cereals, like the granola below, look healthy but actually have as much sugar as a candy bar. Kashi's GoLean lives up to its healthy moniker. This bowl has twice as much fiber as an apple, three times as much protein as a large egg, and even with milk it manages to keep the calorie load below 200 per bowl.

Not That!
Kashi Summer Berry Granola (3/4 cup with 1/2 cup 1% milk)
385 calories
10.5 g fat (2 g saturated)
19.5 g sugars

DID YOU KNOW? Studies show that people underestimate how many calories are in restaurant meals by nearly 100 percent! Think you know healthy foods when you see them? Then I'll bet you'll be shocked by these 25 New Healthy Foods That Aren’t.

Hummus4. BEST DIP SNACK
Sabra Roasted Red Pepper Hummus (2 Tbsp with 10 baby carrots)
105 calories
6 g fat (1 g saturated)
200 mg sodium
2.5 g protein
4 g fiber

Hummus is composed primarily of chickpeas, which have been shown to help regulate blood sugar—probably due to their salutary balance of protein and fiber. Most of that fiber is insoluble, so it promotes colon health. One study even found that people who added chickpeas to their diet ended up taking in fewer total calories. Add to that a few baby carrots and you get the added benefit of vision-preserving, skin-soothing beta-carotene.

Not That!
Lay’s Smooth Ranch Dip (2 tbsp) with Ruffles Loaded Chili & Cheese Potato Chips (1 oz)
220 calories
15 g fat (1 g saturated)
390 mg sodium

Eat This, Not That! secret: You can lose 10, 20, 30 or more pounds while still eating your favorite foods, and without dieting, if you make smart swaps throughout your day. Feast on this delicious list of 15 Desserts That Burn Fat!

Chocolate milk5. BEST DRINK
Lowfat chocolate milk (1 cup)
160 calories
2.5 g fat (1.5 g saturated)
25 g sugars
8 g protein

You probably know that dairy products are an ideal source of calcium, but did you know that calcium actually interferes with your body's ability to absorb fat? To enjoy that effect, though, you need the vitamin D, so thankfully dairy producers add it to milk. Regular, non-chocolate milk offers this benefit, but research shows that chocolate milk might have an edge on the white stuff. A study published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism showed that participants who drank chocolate milk before mounting stationary bikes were able to ride 49 percent longer than those given a generic carbohydrate-replacement beverage. Keep that in mind next time you're about to head out for an afternoon gym session.

Not That!
Arizona Sports Lemon-Lime (1 bottle)
200 calories
0 g fat
52 g sugars
0 g protein

Newman's Own pretzels6. BEST CRUNCHY SNACK
Newman’s Own Organics Spelt Pretzels (20 pretzels)
120 calories
1 g fat (0 g saturated)
240 mg sodium
4 g protein
4 g fiber

Spelt is a grain related to wheat that packs more fiber and protein—and at 6 calories per pretzel, the dietary bang for your buck is undeniable. Over-saltiness is always a concern with pretzels, but the sodium level in this snack is mild. Combine that with Newman's Own's longstanding support for charitable causes—and, in Nell Newman's Organics company, a robust commitment to sustainable, organic farming—and you've got a product you'll proudly pluck from the shelf. Pair these with a hunk of cheddar to rope even more protein into your snack break.

Not That!
Newman’s Own Organics Salted Rounds Pretzels (16 pretzels)
220 calories
2 g fat (0 g saturated)
800 mg sodium
4 g protein
0 g fiber
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,385
2,613
#2
Interesting 2 of those foods are Lebanese. Hummus, the real kind and everyone here calls it plain yogurt but Leb call it labneh. I was talking to IC earlier and it's amazing how healthy Leb food is and also how delicious it is. 2 other GREAT snacks are tabbouleh and fattoush.
 
Lizard King

Lizard King

Administrator
Staff Member
Sep 9, 2010
11,548
3,356
#3
I Love Lebanese food, just hard to find it made good when you eat out.
 
AllTheWay

AllTheWay

TID Lady Member
Mar 17, 2011
4,240
411
#4
interesting. i have a bag of almonds that sits next to my computer that i will snack on a few inbetween surgeries. i have to be careful to not eat too many. when i first started all this "healthy" eating stuff, i consumed copious volumes of almonds and then wondered why i couldnt lose any fat! all things in moderation!


i think we should definitely petition to get m&ms off the dont eat and on the good to eat list!
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,385
2,613
#5
Very true Lizard King. There are only a couple of cities where you can get good Lebanese food and still that doesn't compare to the real thing. I always come back heavier when I go to Leb with the wife and it's hard to diet when the family comes to the US and stays with us. I usually wind up bulking during that time to.
 
Kosher Fried

Kosher Fried

VIP Member
Mar 7, 2011
307
43
#6
i hate the roasted red pepper hummus. i can make my own...but Eat Right brand makes the absolute closest thing to homemade hummus that i can make without the mess...but DAMN i hate greek yogurt!! ugh...
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,385
2,613
#8
i hate the roasted red pepper hummus. i can make my own...but Eat Right brand makes the absolute closest thing to homemade hummus that i can make without the mess...but DAMN i hate greek yogurt!! ugh...
Real hummus doesn't have anything added (no peppers, no lemon, nothing) and it's very healthy for you.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,385
2,613
#10
You can add anything to hummus and it'll be good like pine nuts, lemon, roasted red peppers, etc but in Lebanon they don't add a thing to it and only make it by hand. The wife always laughed at me when I used to add things to hummus. She would look at me and say when we visit her family I better not do any of that shit.

I used to not like Lebanese Labneh but over the past couple years I've change my mind and I really like it exp with Leb olives (very bitter olives).
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,073
1,234
#11
You can add anything to hummus and it'll be good like pine nuts, lemon, roasted red peppers, etc but in Lebanon they don't add a thing to it and only make it by hand. The wife always laughed at me when I used to add things to hummus. She would look at me and say when we visit her family I better not do any of that shit.

I used to not like Lebanese Labneh but over the past couple years I've change my mind and I really like it exp with Leb olives (very bitter olives).

Thought this was funny. I'm not doubting you, as I've never been to Lebanon, but I did know that in the very least, hummus had to have tahini. While doing a quick search, I stumbled across this and thought it was funny. Again, not trying argue. What I will debate however, is how good for you hummus is. Nutritionally it is undoubtedly solid, but digesting garbanzo beans can be a bitch. I have pretty bad gas when I eat hummus, although I absolutely love the stuff and eat it knowing full well that my wife will not sit in the same room with me later that night. :)





Lebanese Hummus - Lebanese Hummus Recipe

Recipe for preparing authentic Lebanese hummus. Hummus has its history as a “food of the poor,” because it’s very filling and fairly nutritious, and yet this chickpea dish has now become a staple eaten throughout the Middle East, showing up on every table at every meal at every level of society. Hummus even shows up regularly on Western appetizer lists and buffet tables.

When I was growing up, my father used to go to the shop to have our hummus made to taste. You could even provide your own tahini (sesame paste) and lemon juice. While making it, the shopkeeper would let you taste it so that it could be prepared exactly how you wanted it...a little more lemon, or a bit more salt. This personalized approach to hummus may be a thing of the past, however, it is still usual to pop out to buy your hummus freshly made in a neighborhood shop...and it’s delicious!

Hummus must have a smooth, velvety texture: this is absolutely essential! In order to achieve this, you need to skin the chickpeas -- not as hard as it may sound!!

Ingredients (Serves 4 to 6 people)
20 ounces (1 ¼ pound) of dried chick peas (also known as garbanzo beans) (Note: Do not use canned chickpeas, they are too soft!)
1 tablespoon of baking soda
6 ounces of tahini (sesame paste)
6 ounces of lemon juice (very cold: add icy water to achieve this)
Salt
For garnish:
Paprika
Sweet red peppers
Parsley
Olive oil
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,385
2,613
#12
The only thing I've ever seen added to hummus and you are correct is Olive Oil. Tahini is in everything with Leb dishes so I don't consider it something added. Only Americans add extra things to the dish according to SS (wife) who was born and lived all her life in Lebanon.

I get gas from a bunch of Leb dishes but that doesn't stop me. Now, SS might get upset with me but she gets over it quickly so I continue to eat it. You should try Labneh w/ zaytoon (Leb olives). I have it with toasted Arabic bread. It's actually my favorite snack food. SS makes it for me.

I've been trying to convince SS to move back to Leb. I'm convinced that if I lived there I'd be leaner and at least twice as strong. All I would need for a gym is a platform, eleiko bar and 280kg eleiko bumper set, and portable squat rack and I'd be set.
 
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