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Hematocrit

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Glycomann

Glycomann

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Jan 19, 2011
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Especially sicne a lot of us are older and also some young guys tend to run AAS high, hematocrit can tend to be high. I stumbled on this paper that lisinopril may help in this.

Evaluation of Adverse Effects of Lisinopril and Rosuvastatin on Hematological and Biochemical Analytes in Wistar Rats.​


This reference in the paper goes more into hemoglobin/hematocrit reduction in lisinopril treatment.
http://www.asterazeneca/documents/product portfolio/Zestril_PM_en.pdf .

Not sure how toxic this is but this drug has been around for a while. I have used it during cycle at low dose and so far I seem OK. it does a good job of reducing BP and my heart rate drops some. just something for reference. caveat emptor.
 
Glycomann

Glycomann

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Here is another paper.

Clinical Trial

Int J Artif Organs

. 1995 Jan;18(1):13-6.

Long term effects of ACE inhibitors on the erythrocytosis in renal transplant recipients​


S M Lal 1 , H S Trivedi, G Ross Jr

Affiliations
  • PMID: 7607751

Abstract​


Erythrocytosis is infrequently seen in renal transplant recipients. Both theophylline and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to decrease the elevated hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hgb) levels. We studied the efficacy of the ACE inhibitors ramipril (n = 6) and enalapril (n = 1) in seven stable renal transplant recipients. Although the ACE inhibitors significantly reduced the elevated Hct and Hgb levels during the short and long term (Hct 53 +/- 1 vs 48.8 +/- 0.7%; Hgb 17.8 +/- 0.4 vs 16.7 +/- 0.3 vs 16.7 +/- 0.3 gm/dl, at 1 year), the clinical significance of these reductions remains unknown. During therapy there were no significant changes in the blood pressure, serum creatinine and potassium levels and the medications were well tolerated.
 
Glycomann

Glycomann

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Why not just donate blood? Thats how I keep my levels from going high.
Because frequent donation causes rebound in a lot of people. You can end up with higher and higher HCT over time. then can lead to iron deficiency. But I think donation is part of the solution toolbox. I donate ~ 2x a year. I time it for an off period to avoid rebound. A few years back I got myself into a rebound paradox. I don't know if Lisoinopril is a major part of the Hct control toolbox but I thought it interesting. I use it to control BP. I never did blood work or a dosage scheme with blood work to see how effective it is in me in my therapeutic range for BP control.
 
P

pincushn

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Dec 13, 2022
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Because frequent donation causes rebound in a lot of people. You can end up with higher and higher HCT over time. then can lead to iron deficiency. But I think donation is part of the solution toolbox. I donate ~ 2x a year. I time it for an off period to avoid rebound. A few years back I got myself into a rebound paradox. I don't know if Lisoinopril is a major part of the Hct control toolbox but I thought it interesting. I use it to control BP. I never did blood work or a dosage scheme with blood work to see how effective it is in me in my therapeutic range for BP control.
I recently discovered this the hard way.
I donated in Jan, March and June of this year. Recent bloods have my MCV, MCH and MCHC TOO low ...and my RDW & RBC high. Hemoglobin on the extreme lower side of norm. Hemocrate is excellent as of right now.

Will not be donating no where near as much.
 
Glycomann

Glycomann

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I recently discovered this the hard way.
I donated in Jan, March and June of this year. Recent bloods have my MCV, MCH and MCHC TOO low ...and my RDW & RBC high. Hemoglobin on the extreme lower side of norm. Hemocrate is excellent as of right now.

Will not be donating no where near as much.
Check your ferritin. When it gets to low hct drops like a stone.
 
genetic freak

genetic freak

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Dec 28, 2015
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Because frequent donation causes rebound in a lot of people. You can end up with higher and higher HCT over time. then can lead to iron deficiency. But I think donation is part of the solution toolbox. I donate ~ 2x a year. I time it for an off period to avoid rebound. A few years back I got myself into a rebound paradox. I don't know if Lisoinopril is a major part of the Hct control toolbox but I thought it interesting. I use it to control BP. I never did blood work or a dosage scheme with blood work to see how effective it is in me in my therapeutic range for BP control.
Yes, this is what happens when I donate. A couple weeks after donating my HCT is right back to what is was before, sometimes higher. I have tried giving whole blood and power reds, it doesn't matter.

I have been reading about ACE inhibitors possibly being used to keep your RBC/HCT/hemoglobin under control. I figured even if it doesn't help that much, it isn't going to hurt. Plus, like you said, it helps with BP.
 
Snachito1

Snachito1

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Jan 12, 2018
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If I remember correctly enalipril (also an ACE inhibitor) works really good for HCT not sure if it's the same or better than Lisinopril.
 
W

Wilson6

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I take Lisinopril, makes no difference. Been donating every 10 - 12 weeks for 7 years, age or dose is the only variable that seems to drive the HCT given the same dosing and phlebo frequency. Even the gels drove the HCT up, just didn't have to donate as frequently but the gels had poor and variable absorption, skin has aromatase and 5 AR activity the drives E2 and DHT and they are expensive.
 
Glycomann

Glycomann

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If I remember correctly enalipril (also an ACE inhibitor) works really good for HCT not sure if it's the same or better than Lisinopril.
I think you're correct without looking but I think I have seen that.
 
Glycomann

Glycomann

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I take Lisinopril, makes no difference. Been donating every 10 - 12 weeks for 7 years, age or dose is the only variable that seems to drive the HCT given the same dosing and phlebo frequency. Even the gels drove the HCT up, just didn't have to donate as frequently but the gels had poor and variable absorption, skin has aromatase and 5 AR activity the drives E2 and DHT and they are expensive.
I'm OK at 100 mg/w last I checked but could have changed in the last year or so. 150 mg/w and i am at 53%. Also, I have been experimenting with Test Prop last couple years trying to more closely align with more natural T rhythms.
 
JackD

JackD

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Sep 16, 2010
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Mine usually hovers around the high end of normal. I donate blood a few times a year and keep iron consumption low. Really no red meat or veggies high in iron.
 
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