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Grip Strength and its Affects on Other Things

BovaJP

BovaJP

Senior Moderators
Feb 15, 2013
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865
My personal trainer knows about my shoulder and all my body issues LOL. as a good personal trainer should. He really works with me on movements that are good for me and doesn't hurt or will reinjure shoulder (i'm 2.5 yrs now post RC repair surgery).

One thing this past week he has been touting (he goes on binges in that he studies things, and then takes to his clients and has a new thing to kind of work on LOL),has been grip strength. He said he has been studying where weak grip strength then leads to shoulder injuries. So i have been really focusing on a strong grip strength in my arm movements (be it chest press, shoulder press, whatever),and have noticed that when i really focus on the grip it takes away from the shoulder. Whereas a weak grip, you may use more shoulder in your movement. I have been experimenting with this on my own as well and its really true. But it also helps that a personal trainer is there as well to remind you to do this, or that.

Now, i'm a female, but it is still important. I know with guys they do all sorts of grip strength movements (the gripper thingy, etc). I think regardless of gender, this is important work and shouldn't be overlooked. Matter of fact, could avoid injury due to this.

Happy Lifting Y'all
 
The other Snake

The other Snake

VIP Member
Aug 19, 2016
548
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All due respect, not buying into it. I always worked forearms and never had a problem with my grip while lifting. I may have missed a DL because the weight was more than I could handle but never because of my grip.

I will buy in on LK point about bad form but that goes for anything we do. Sometime we get injured because of overuse such as my shoulder labrum repair and sometimes, we just stepped over the line.
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,436
1,811
There’s a definite correlation between grip strength/hand position and shoulder strength/stability. The shoulder prepares for movement/stability based on how hard the hand squeezes something, every single time. This is why grip-aids that don’t require any hand activation like the metal hook ones, suck. Any grip aid should require you to still grab and squeeze.

Now that I’m training differently for arm wrestling, I’ve come to realize that forearm and grip strength don’t necessarily mean wrist strength, and vice versa every which way. There are so many things going on in your arms from the most complicated shoulder joint to the delicate wrist joint and the always-strained elbow in between, and the hundreds of muscles and tendons and ligaments working in harmony to twist and turn and extend and flex.

Your trainer is spot on in my experience and opinion. There are quite a few studies on this as well.

Snake, I’m sure she and her trainer aren’t saying that’s the case for all people. My grip strength is spot on and I’ve never been a straps guy, but I have shoulder issues too. All the “for most people” flies out the window with like us that go really hard for years on end.
 
S

searay

VIP Member
Dec 20, 2017
506
402
The other issue is genetics as far as arthritis goes. Even though I've always use straps and wrist wraps my hands had got to the point of extremely painful about 6 mo ago. I've had over 6 cortizone shots in my hands recently and with the curcumin they feel almost fine. If I don't use straps I get trigger finger at nite which totally sucks. Shoulder inj. and pain comes from many things the least, as far as I'm concerned, is from not gripping the bar tight enough.
 
B

Bilter

VIP Member
Jun 7, 2011
110
99
In my opinion it is detrimental to allow any part of your body (strength) to lag behind the rest of the body. Its important to train your entire body to keep a balance of strength. It most certainly goes a long way to help prevent injury.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
914
1,328
My personal trainer knows about my shoulder and all my body issues LOL. as a good personal trainer should. He really works with me on movements that are good for me and doesn't hurt or will reinjure shoulder (i'm 2.5 yrs now post RC repair surgery).

One thing this past week he has been touting (he goes on binges in that he studies things, and then takes to his clients and has a new thing to kind of work on LOL),has been grip strength. He said he has been studying where weak grip strength then leads to shoulder injuries. So i have been really focusing on a strong grip strength in my arm movements (be it chest press, shoulder press, whatever),and have noticed that when i really focus on the grip it takes away from the shoulder. Whereas a weak grip, you may use more shoulder in your movement. I have been experimenting with this on my own as well and its really true. But it also helps that a personal trainer is there as well to remind you to do this, or that.

Now, i'm a female, but it is still important. I know with guys they do all sorts of grip strength movements (the gripper thingy, etc). I think regardless of gender, this is important work and shouldn't be overlooked. Matter of fact, could avoid injury due to this.

Happy Lifting Y'all

Grip strength is a big issue in the sport of powerlifting. I always told guys when they asked what to do to increase grip strength.......DEADLIFT. Even doing overloads on the deadlift holding the weight for 10 seconds helps big time.
 
macgyver

macgyver

TID Board Of Directors
Nov 24, 2011
1,783
1,311
Never done any 'direct' forearm work...ever.

Grip is trained during other movements, however, I am a BIG believer in straps where grip may otherwise fail.

I even use straps for some movements to concentrate on back etc rather than the assistance that can come from biceps/forearms on lat pulldns as an example

The key is be well rounded, but if you are training a balanced program, your entire body should be getting hit properly. I have never really focused on isolation exercises and in my opinion they should only be a very small part of your training. EG, squats and leg presses will build your quads more than leg extensions.

I think people (especially trainers) tend to overcomplicate things. Just like hiring a trainer for a 'diet'. They try to make it seem like it is some magical formula to justify that you are paying them for what is really very simple concepts.

Just my opinion and many ways to do this stuff. I believe the most simple and logical approach is the best. WHEN,....and very few people ever even come close, when you are trying to extract the last 1-2% of your physique or strength, you may have to employ targeting tactics.
 
DungeonDweller

DungeonDweller

VIP Member
Mar 21, 2017
1,235
964
I've been doing some grip work as a finisher for a few years now, plus have some Ironmind grippers laying around the living room I use when watching tv. Originally I did it to help my deadlift, but noticed my grip was been a weak spot for me when my hands were tiring before the muscle I was working on other lifts as well.
 
The other Snake

The other Snake

VIP Member
Aug 19, 2016
548
574
Never done any 'direct' forearm work...ever.

Grip is trained during other movements, however, I am a BIG believer in straps where grip may otherwise fail.

I even use straps for some movements to concentrate on back etc rather than the assistance that can come from biceps/forearms on lat pulldns as an example
Oh hell ya to straps. If you want to work your back, you gotta take out the weak links. Straps take out the grip and to some extent, some bi. You can focus the movement into the entire back. If you're not using straps during back work, you're short-changing yourself.
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,436
1,811
I think her point, and my follow up, is in regards to health of the joints and injury prevention...not targeting certain muscles or lifting bigger weights than hand strength will allow.

The idea is that when you squeeze your hand hard and the body naturally then prepares the wrist, elbow, shoulder and even spine (your CNS is amazing) for loaded movement, you minimize the risk of injury and keep the joints in a stronger and safer position.

To each their own.
 
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