Draining your own blood?

Discussion in 'Injury Recovery & Prevention' started by parttimer, Dec 14, 2017.

  1. parttimer

    parttimer VIP Member

    Oct 11, 2011
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    Anyone ever do this? So backstory, my GF donates plasma, makes a decent amount on the side. She does it to help people, not for the cash. I decided to give it a try, figure we can both sit there for an hour and make $100. First time i was denied due to high hematocrit. Second time I went I was able to donate. I have been denied 3 more times since then. So, since I am on test and i know that can cause you to have thicker blood I went to donate blood. Well I have 2 red bumps on my arm, can't donate, there must be something wrong with your skin. So, I saw a long time ago someone drained their own blood. I figure if I can drain a few hundred ML that should help thin some things out and maybe even make me feel a little better since I am usually pretty tired. Guessing it's the thick blood being hard to pump. Odd thing is my BP is usually 110/70 with a 70 pulse. I thought about ordering some butterfly syringes and draining out. I see medvet has blood collection bags too. Anyone have some suggestions?
     
  2. OldManStrength

    OldManStrength VIP Member

    Apr 8, 2015
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    I would be leary of draining my own blood. I don't know just doesn't seem normal. Lol

    Only time I have had a problem with high hemo, is when I was on EQ, they wanted me to see a specialist... when I was done with the r's, it went back to normal.

    I have never been refused because of bumps on my arm when I donate. Seems strange.

    Good luck, maybe hire a vampire to help you out... :)
     
  3. Mike_RN

    Mike_RN Senior Moderators Staff Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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    I am an ER Nurse so my skillset allows me to do this quick and easy. If done alone, it will get messy.

    You need a LARGE bore IV catheter, 14ga ideal or 18ga at the smallest. It helps to have a 60ml Leur Lock syringe if you can get one. The smaller IV will clot off (stop free flowing pretty quick). The big syringe allows you to take of a measured amount safer and lessens the chance of losing flow. 6x60ml = 360ml which is equal to one unit of Packed RBCs.

    I have done this the night before going to Red Cross Donate to make sure my HGB/HCT weren't too high to donate. Make sure to stay super hydrated too as this will hemo-dilute and lower the HGB/HCT reading at the donation center.
     
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  4. DungeonDweller

    DungeonDweller VIP Member

    Mar 21, 2017
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    You think it's okay for someone who has been around pins and syringes a while to do this safely? I haven't been denied yet, but I was very high last donation.
     
  5. Mike_RN

    Mike_RN Senior Moderators Staff Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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    Yes, If you've got decent vascularity and can manage to stick yourself with passing out :) IM shots are easy, IV access is not. You have to go slow, pierce the lumen of the vein, pause and look for a "flash" of blood in the catheter and then advance only the catheter (not the needle or you'll punch thru the other side of the vein.) I do it w/out a tourniquet on but I have freaky big forearm and antecubital veins. It is very tough to do one handed, even for me who starts 10-15 IVs per day at work. Do it over the kitchen sink after cleaning all surfaces with bleach and a good sopa and water hand wash.
     
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  6. parttimer

    parttimer VIP Member

    Oct 11, 2011
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    LOL, I looked at my arm was like what? That ingrown hair is keeping me from donating blood?! So I have decided to not donate blood, plasma or any of my organs, screw all of you!! :)
     
  7. Mike_RN

    Mike_RN Senior Moderators Staff Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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    The butterfly needles are easier to use but since the needle remains in the arm the whole time (unlike IV catheters) it's easier to dislodge or punch thru the vein.
     
  8. parttimer

    parttimer VIP Member

    Oct 11, 2011
    710
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    LOL, I looked at my arm was like what? That ingrown hair is keeping me from donating blood?! So I have decided to not donate blood, plasma or any of my organs, screw all of you!! :)
     
  9. CFM

    CFM VIP Member

    Mar 18, 2012
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  10. BackAtIt

    BackAtIt MuscleHead

    Oct 3, 2016
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    If RBC's and/or HGB /HCT are to high to donate, can u request to take blood and discard?...Mike?
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2017
  11. Mike_RN

    Mike_RN Senior Moderators Staff Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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    No they won't even stick you if Blood Pressure or HGB/HCT are too high. Neither one makes sense since donating would actually help one and possibly even lower BP a few diastolic points. The reasoning is liability as there are not (typically) Docs or RNs on site at donation centers. Thus they have to adhere to rigid criteria.
     
  12. Mike_RN

    Mike_RN Senior Moderators Staff Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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