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Internet ID Card

marx

marx

MuscleHead
Sep 29, 2010
4,671
625
#1
Remember when it was deemed OK to gather all our emails and the corporations doing it were granted immunity from responsibility?

Here we are going another step.

Anonymity allows folks outside the corporate power structure.

Remember, it's for our own good- only bad people with something to hide want to be anonymous~ Right?

The Coming Internet National ID Card
President Obama is planning to hand the U.S. Commerce Department authority over a forthcoming cybersecurity effort to create an Internet ID for Americans, a White House official said, according to CBS News TechTalk.

It's [the Commerce Department] "the absolute perfect spot in the U.S. government" to centralize efforts toward creating an "identity ecosystem" for the Internet, White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Howard Schmidt said.

The Obama administration is currently drafting what it's calling the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, which U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said will be released by the president in the next few months.

CBS goes on, "We are not talking about a national ID card," Locke said at the Stanford event. "We are not talking about a government-controlled system. What we are talking about is enhancing online security and privacy and reducing and perhaps even eliminating the need to memorize a dozen passwords, through creation and use of more trusted digital identities."

Don't believe this for a nanosecond.

According to CBS, Schmidt stressed that anonymity and pseudonymity will remain possible on the internet. "I don't have to get a credential if I don't want to," he said. There's no chance that "a centralized database will emerge," and "we need the private sector to lead the implementation of this," he said.

The anonymity under this program, mark my words, will be the phony "freedom option" that the government now always uses when they want to take away some of your freedoms. It is all part of the 'nudge' philosophy of the White House adviser and evil puppet master, Cass Sunstein.

What they do is 'nudge' you in the direction they want you to go in and offer a phony distasteful alternative. I was among the first to warn about this in relation to TSA body scanning versus the "groping" option. It looks like it's coming to internet ID. It's not clear how they will do it, but the default for most of the internet will be the ID option. The opt-out anonymity option will be difficult and distasteful, that's how government works when Cass Sunstein gets involved. For all practical purposes, internet anonymity will be gone.
 
Mindlesswork

Mindlesswork

Crusty Poo Butt
Sep 21, 2010
1,395
33
#2
The US govt's only going to be bigger and much more intrusive in our lives with something like this. This needs to be voted down and fast
 
marx

marx

MuscleHead
Sep 29, 2010
4,671
625
#5
Sounds innocuous enough, right? For safety, like a drivers license, it will only affect bad people- cuz who else really needs to be anonymous?

It started when the last President got away with hoovering up the e-mails of regular Americans- and the corporations that broke the law under his direction were given immunity from prosecution.

Some of the same players are supporting this Internet ID. The noose is tightening down concerning freedom.

Freedom? Freedom to shop and pay your bills is corporate freedom, along with freedom to be tracked and data mined....

It could be the best idea for the Internet in years – or a privacy nightmare.

On Friday, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and White House Cybersecurity czar Howard Schmidt ventured into the heart of Silicon Valley to announce plans for what some Web wags are already calling a “National Internet ID” but which proponents liken to an “online driver’s license.”

"We are not talking about a national ID card," Locke said at a conference hosted by the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research in Palo Alto, Calif., according to CNET. "We are not talking about a government-controlled system. What we are talking about is enhancing online security and privacy, and reducing and perhaps even eliminating the need to memorize a dozen passwords, through creation and use of more trusted digital identities."

Details of how the “driver’s license” would work are scarce, but a working paper issued last year suggested that private online retailers would offer customers an account they could use for multiple, or even all, vendors, eliminating the need to remember numerous usernames and passwords.

Schmidt, speaking at the Palo Alto event, denied that such an ID would be mandatory.

"I don't have to get a credential, if I don't want to," he said, adding he doubted that "a centralized database will emerge," and that "we need the private sector to lead the implementation of this."

The program is part of something called the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, or NSTIC, which, according to Bloomberg News, has the backing of such tech titans as Verizon, Google, PayPal, Symantec and AT&T.

What’s interesting is that the Commerce Department is handling this initiative, rather than the Department of Homeland Security, which originally hosted NSTIC, or the Pentagon’s National Security Agency.

Commerce has overseen the civilian Internet since the early days, and continues to take a remarkably hands-off approach for a federal agency governing such a big part of our daily lives.

That cheered some civil libertarians, including the American Civil Liberties Union’s Jay Stanley.

“If the concept were implemented in a perfect way it would be very good,” he told Bloomberg News. “It’s a convenience. But having a single point of failure may not be good for protecting privacy. The devil’s really in the details.”

John Clippinger of Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society took a rosy view of the proposal.

“This is going to cause a huge shift in consumer use of the Internet,” he told Bloomberg News. “There’s going to be a huge bump and a huge increase in the amount and kind of data retailers are going to have.”

Still, it’s not the first time someone’s tried to set up such an “Internet passport.”

Chroniclers of failed Microsoft initiatives will remember Microsoft Passport, which tried to do this more than 10 years ago but failed to catch on. Its descendant is Windows Live ID, which works mostly on Microsoft-owned sites such as Hotmail and Xbox Live.

Similarly, Google’s ID works across the Google universe, but not outside it. A newer initiative called OpenID claims to have the backing of Google, Microsoft, AOL and Yahoo!, among others, but it’s not widely known.

Facebook’s been a bit more successful with its Facebook Connect program, started in 2008. Many blogs and news sites, including this one, now let commenters log in with their Facebook IDs, which have to be verified with users’ real names.
 
Lizard King

Lizard King

Administrator
Staff Member
Sep 9, 2010
11,595
3,418
#7
Wow, Skynet is starting to think for itself now. Gonna go put my tin foil hat on again!
 
captaincaveman

captaincaveman

TID Board Of Directors
Oct 17, 2010
1,147
220
#9
Thank you Marx. I have been telling/warning people for years that POLITICS MATTERS. The excuse "It doesn't matter so I don't vote" no longer applies.

It is common sense that an ever expanding object in a finite space (that you are in with the object) will ultimately touch or encompass you. This expansive government will touch you. Be prepared. Get involved.
 
Fish77

Fish77

VIP Member
Dec 24, 2010
314
28
#11
I seen this the other day and got thinking about it. You can't police a global system, just can't do it. So this type of thinking, safety online, will lead to the end of the global internet. China has done it all along, closed the boarders, why not us in the name of personal safety and national security. It is coming, does not matter the administration that puts the finial nail.

Think if the spam you would get if you had one ID for life.
 
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