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Anyone cut meat out?

JackD

JackD

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 16, 2010
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#1
Has anyone cut meat out and went on a plant based meal plan and use plant based protein?

If so which are the best plant based Proteins?

Where did you find your recipes for meals?
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Dec 25, 2010
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#3
Man bun tips also welcome
LOL. I won't be a good source of info. I like plants just fine, but they're served on my plate next to a portion of meat. I beginning to think that more than 1g protein per pound of LBM isn't necessary, so I'm thinking your best protein source would be a blended protein powder.

That assumes that if you mean "meat" you also are excluding fish. Otherwise, orange roughy, red snapper, salmon, etc.
 
Mike_RN

Mike_RN

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Staff Member
Aug 13, 2013
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1,498
#6
Pea protein has come a long way, soy is a nogo due to phytoestrogens. Is this a Vegan thing or health thing?

I eat fish, eggs and yogurt more often than beef or poultry but I have yet to see any “very” healthy animal free bodies in my gym or my hospital experience.
 
JackD

JackD

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 16, 2010
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#7
It’s def more of a health thing on my end. The plant based proteins have come a long way, and soy is bad, so I stay away from that.

More or less trying something different to see what the results are. My typical meal was meat served with whatever. Milk, eggs, fish too were all on the menu. LK’s smoker hasn’t helped curb my thoughts... lol

However, 30 days ago as a challenge I decided to cut meat out and change things up. Still eating fresh caught fish, but switching my meals over to beans, legumes, grains, veggies and fruits to see what the results are. I’m still getting tons of protein per day, just changed the sources.

Also Switched over to a pea protein powder, and instead of milk using this high protein Almond/cashew milk.

The change off the top has been no more 2pm slump and what seems like more energy and just feeling better.

It’s all foreign to me, but I’m curious to see the results and changes. So if anyone has thoughts or suggestions, post it up!
 
ITAWOLF

ITAWOLF

VIP Member
Dec 9, 2010
1,049
449
#8
wtf!!!

dang do i even know you anymore!!!

i have been without meat for 5mths while tracking thru the sand ........i ate carbs n water ......nothing really else and could only eat when i could or had something to eat
i even chewed chic-licks that i dropped in the sand while trying to dodge crazy hot lead

worst my body ever looked ---but didnt feel bad
no real weight to me ---i think i was like 190ish -----

on a side note --why i didnt eat meat was
1--u dont always know what ur eating
2--lawd sitting on the stomach in the heat
3--having to shit ---just a bad thought getting shot at while each cheek on a cinder block or hovering

now i have cut down on portion size of meat but fish---esp red meat

i love a good steak or ribs but ill be bloated n down for half a day
 
CFM

CFM

National Wheelchair Beautification Month Bedazzler
Mar 18, 2012
805
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#9
Everyone I've known that went vegan does really good. A year or so later, not so much. I suggest going on a low protein diet (I have) and see how it works out for you.
 
Lizard King

Lizard King

Administrator
Staff Member
Sep 9, 2010
11,463
3,261
#10
Taking this class for discount on my Health Insurance, figured I would copy and paste for you @JackD

Eggs, dairy products, legumes, tofu, nuts and seeds are all great vegetarian sources of protein. Research shows that eating too much animal meat is actually harmful for your health and contributes to certain diseases and cancers. The benefits of vegetable sources of protein are numerous. These foods can be easily included in your diet in various ways, keeping your diet interesting while increasing your intake of beneficial nutrients.

This week's goals
To gain knowledge about vegetarian sources of protein and how best to include them into your diet.

Eggs
Eggs are excellent sources of protein and many other micronutrients, including iron, vitamin B12, zinc, folic acid and vitamin B6. Eggs are highly versatile and are also a cheaper source of protein compared to animal meats. Eggs are great at breakfast or can be used to whip up a quick dinner omelette or vegetable frittata. Boiled eggs make a great snack too!

The best methods to cook eggs are poaching or boiling, as these don't require the addition of extra fats. If you like scrambled or fried eggs, use a non-stick pan or a small amount of healthy oil to keep the calories to a minimum.

Dairy Products
Dairy products include milk, cheese and yogurt. In addition to providing protein, dairy products also provide the most concentrated source of calcium in the diet. Calcium is essential for strong bones and teeth, as well as keeping your nerves and muscles working well. Dairy products provide other essential nutrients, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc, vitamin B12 and riboflavin. More specifically, yogurt provides a dietary source of probiotics which are a type of good bacteria that improves gut health.

Low-fat dairy products are recommended over full-fat, as they are lower in saturated fat and better for your heart health. Opt for unsweetened, natural yogurt which is lower in sugar than the flavored types.

Try to include two to three servings of low-fat dairy foods every day to ensure you are meeting your calcium requirements. One serving is equivalent to:

  • 1 cup of dairy milk or soy milk with added calcium
  • 1 cup of yogurt
  • 2 slices of cheese
Legumes
Legumes are a class of vegetables that include lentils, beans, split peas and chickpeas. They are a good source of protein and provide a range of other essential nutrients including zinc, magnesium, calcium, folic acid, thiamine and phytonutrients.

Legumes are low in fat and high in fiber, making them excellent choices for helping to manage weight. Here are some tips on including more legumes in your diet:

  • Keep canned beans, lentils or chickpeas in your pantry and add them to soups, salads and stews.
  • Blend chickpeas with lemon juice, tahini and garlic to make a quick hummus which can be used as a dip or spread.
  • Replace some of the meat in your recipes with lentils, kidney beans or cannellini beans. This works well with spaghetti Bolognese, lasagne, shepherd's pie and casseroles.
Tofu
Tofu is a soft white vegetable source of protein made from soy milk. It is low in fat and provides a source of calcium, iron and magnesium in the diet. Tofu has very little flavor on its own, but adds a great texture to dishes. It can be used in just about any meal as it takes on the taste of the ingredients you use when cooking. Tofu can be included raw in a dish, or it can be stewed, stir-fried, added to soup or cooked in a sauce.

Nuts and seeds
Nuts and seeds can easily be added to breakfast cereals, smoothies or included as a simple snack. Unlike legumes, nuts and seeds are higher in fat. The type of fat found in them is the healthy kind - monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat. These are called the 'good' fats due to their many health benefits including lowering cholesterol levels, reducing inflammation and risk of heart disease.

Although the fats found in nuts and seeds are 'good' fats, the amount of fat in the diet should still be limited, as fats are high in calories and may lead to weight gain. Therefore, be sure to choose small portions of nuts and seeds.

Key messages for this week:
  • Vegetarian sources of protein include eggs, dairy foods, legumes, tofu, nuts and seeds.
  • Incorporate a variety of these foods into your diet every day as they provide a range of micronutrients in addition to important protein.
 
DungeonDweller

DungeonDweller

VIP Member
Mar 21, 2017
540
260
#11
on a side note --why i didnt eat meat was
1--u dont always know what ur eating
2--lawd sitting on the stomach in the heat
3--having to shit ---just a bad thought getting shot at while each cheek on a cinder block or hovering
MRE's have protein, right? I never had to survive on them so I don't know how they are long-term. Or even if the "protein" is real meat or a meat substitute.
 
ITAWOLF

ITAWOLF

VIP Member
Dec 9, 2010
1,049
449
#12
MRE's have protein, right? I never had to survive on them so I don't know how they are long-term. Or even if the "protein" is real meat or a meat substitute.
alot of fat but do have some protein i believe it was potroast with like 20 or 30 gr at like 1400kals --- more prob a 60/10/30 ratio carbs fats pro

we sold them mostly--crazy what info u can get for them and what u can get ---even LKs nona world famous ravioli ---i stuck with tons of beef jerky if lucky ----
 
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