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Wrong about diets

testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
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Did u view the above one?....If so, he was saying that in the presents of insulin, u can't burn fat...Is this true?....
.
Yes, it’s true. Insulin is a nutrient shuttle and storage hormone.
Today’s overweight and obesity crisis (which = health crisis in general) is in large part a result of excessive carb heavy diets, and the resultant impact on consistently elevated insulin levels (signaling storage),as well as a resultant production of hunger hormones that keep the person craving more and more.
The excessive carbs are commonly consumed along with fats as well.
 
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S

searay

VIP Member
Dec 20, 2017
506
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[QUOTE="gunslinger, post: 553553, member: 11



It's almost like I have found religion. I'm starting to question EVERYTHING now. My stance on gun control, abortion, I might even become a democrat. My sexuality may also be in question now.
[/QUOTE]

Thats what a bad diet will do to ya !!!
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
914
1,320
Did u view the above one?....If so, he was saying that in the presents of insulin, u can't burn fat...Is this true?....
.
I don't have time to watch it today but maybe will later tonight since I have 3 weeks off. But if that is what he says, in general he is right. Metabolically, insulin promotes synthesis of fat (fatty acids and triglycerides) and impairs mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids. That being said, there are certainly a lot of BB'er I know who have used insulin while cutting and gotten good result, still dropped fat and managed to retain muscle. I have never done this but the key seems to be keeping your carb intake around when you do the fast acting insulin, GH/testosterone. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1641767/
But then we are spealking of chemically enhanced athletes. In a BB when you combine carbs with insulin, GH and testosterone the carb and amino acids are immediately shuttled into the muscle, thus supersaturating the muscle causing sacoplasmic hypertrophy which kick starts myofibrillar growth and not fat storage. At this point you are already taking in very few carbs.

Again, I warn about putting too much stock into medical doctors who are practicing nutrition. Most only have 1 undergraduate nutrition course under their belt. Their expertise is medicine and in the case of Dr. Jason Fung he even says he is a Canadian nephrologist. Why would a medical doctor who specializes in kidney issues have a web site claiming to be the "diet doctor"? Kidney doctors here in Houston make plenty of money and have no time to play nutritionist on Youtube and Instagram. If they feel you need one they refer yout to a reputable nutritionists. Then in the next sentence Dr. Fung claims he is the world's leading expert.....intermittant fasting, low carb and type 2 diabetes. Yet his speciality is kidney issues, nephrology? I do know guys who are experts in all three fields but they don;'t clam to be medical doctors rather PhD's in human metabolism. Want some good information on intermittant fastin, type II diabetesg and low carb/ketosis try Dr. Stephen Phinney and Dr. Jeff Volek. These two IMHO are true experts in the field.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
914
1,320
Yes, it’s true. Insulin is a nutrient shuttle and storage hormone.
Today’s overweight and obesity crisis (which = health crisis in general) is in large part a result of excessive carb heavy diets, and the resultant impact on consistently elevated insulin levels (signaling storage),as well as a resultant production of hunger hormones that keep the person craving more and more.
The excessive carbs are commonly consumed along with fats as well.

I do want to comment on this.........I did a research study when I did my masters degree on attitudes and beliefs of nutrition and exercise in kinesiology majors and nutrition majors. I found through a valid questionaire that kinesiology majors understood better the importance of exercise and nutrition where nutrition majors generally had poor attotudes toward exericse. In general, may of the problem we have with obesity and type II diabetes is not only poor nutrition but the complete lack of any exercise. Activity is the best way to control blood sugar levels.

Now the other problem as you suggested and is also pointed out by Dr Volek is how we were mislead to about dietary fats and protein starting back in the 70's. We were encouraged to eat less protein because it contains too much saturated fat that this clamed to be the cause of heart disease. So what did we do? We increae the consumption of carbohydrates. During this time kids went from being very active to hiding in the house stuffing their mouths with chips and candy. While I know the importance of carbs to athletes I also have no problem recognizing that Americans in general over consume carbs, especially high GI carbs. We also lack exericse. In fact, WHO has listed sedentary lifestyles to be the LEADING cause of death not only in America but the wold.

Role of Carbohydrates.JPG
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
1,896
529
Yes, it’s true. Insulin is a nutrient shuttle and storage hormone. Today’s overweight and obesity crisis (which = health crisis in general) is in large part a result of excessive carb heavy diets, and the resultant impact on consistently elevated insulin levels (signaling storage),as well as a resultant production of hunger hormones that keep the person craving more and more. The excessive carbs are commonly consumed along with fats as well.
I don't have time to watch it today but maybe will later tonight since I have 3 weeks off. But if that is what he says, in general he is right. Metabolically, insulin promotes synthesis of fat (fatty acids and triglycerides) and impairs mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids. That being said, there are certainly a lot of BB'er I know who have used insulin while cutting and gotten good result, still dropped fat and managed to retain muscle. I have never done this but the key seems to be keeping your carb intake around when you do the fast acting insulin, GH/testosterone. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1641767/ But then we are spealking of chemically enhanced athletes. In a BB when you combine carbs with insulin, GH and testosterone the carb and amino acids are immediately shuttled into the muscle, thus supersaturating the muscle causing sacoplasmic hypertrophy which kick starts myofibrillar growth and not fat storage. At this point you are already taking in very few carbs.

Again, I warn about putting too much stock into medical doctors who are practicing nutrition. Most only have 1 undergraduate nutrition course under their belt. Their expertise is medicine and in the case of Dr. Jason Fung he even says he is a Canadian nephrologist. Why would a medical doctor who specializes in kidney issues have a web site claiming to be the "diet doctor"? Kidney doctors here in Houston make plenty of money and have no time to play nutritionist on Youtube and Instagram. If they feel you need one they refer yout to a reputable nutritionists. Then in the next sentence Dr. Fung claims he is the world's leading expert.....intermittant fasting, low carb and type 2 diabetes. Yet his speciality is kidney issues, nephrology? I do know guys who are experts in all three fields but they don;'t clam to be medical doctors rather PhD's in human metabolism. Want some good information on intermittant fastin, type II diabetesg and low carb/ketosis try Dr. Stephen Phinney and Dr. Jeff Volek. These two IMHO are true experts in the field.
I do want to comment on this.........I did a research study when I did my masters degree on attitudes and beliefs of nutrition and exercise in kinesiology majors and nutrition majors. I found through a valid questionaire that kinesiology majors understood better the importance of exercise and nutrition where nutrition majors generally had poor attotudes toward exericse. In general, may of the problem we have with obesity and type II diabetes is not only poor nutrition but the complete lack of any exercise. Activity is the best way to control blood sugar levels.

Now the other problem as you suggested and is also pointed out by Dr Volek is how we were mislead to about dietary fats and protein starting back in the 70's. We were encouraged to eat less protein because it contains too much saturated fat that this clamed to be the cause of heart disease. So what did we do? We increae the consumption of carbohydrates. During this time kids went from being very active to hiding in the house stuffing their mouths with chips and candy. While I know the importance of carbs to athletes I also have no problem recognizing that Americans in general over consume carbs, especially high GI carbs. We also lack exericse. In fact, WHO has listed sedentary lifestyles to be the LEADING cause of death not only in America but the wold.

View attachment 11395


Dear bro's (TB and ST),

Thank u for the reply's....TB, years ago I read about insulin being compared to a "delivery" truck that shuttles the macro's (nutrients, vitamins, etc) into our cells....If I remember correctly the read also pointed out that the slower the food digest, the better (insulin stays within normal levels) it is for fat loss and lack of fat gain...I don't remember it referencing hunger hormones, but that is good know....

So, lets say a person eats simple carbs all day long but they keep the total calories below their deficit for metabolic rate....Will they not be able to burn fat due to their insulin staying spiked through the day even tho they are in a deficit?....

ST, same question....I will read that link....Thank you for taking the time to help me out!.....U and TB have refreshed my memory on this matter!......Now if I can put it together maybe and can apply to my routine!....Again, fella's I appreciate your time and effort!!!!!.

.
 
CJ Smalls

CJ Smalls

Member
Aug 15, 2020
41
36
Dear bro's (TB and ST),

Thank u for the reply's....TB, years ago I read about insulin being compared to a "delivery" truck that shuttles the macro's (nutrients, vitamins, etc) into our cells....If I remember correctly the read also pointed out that the slower the food digest, the better (insulin stays within normal levels) it is for fat loss and lack of fat gain...I don't remember it referencing hunger hormones, but that is good know....

So, lets say a person eats simple carbs all day long but they keep the total calories below their deficit for metabolic rate....Will they not be able to burn fat due to their insulin staying spiked through the day even tho they are in a deficit?....

ST, same question....I will read that link....Thank you for taking the time to help me out!.....U and TB have refreshed my memory on this matter!......Now if I can put it together maybe and can apply to my routine!....Again, fella's I appreciate your time and effort!!!!!.

.
Of course they will, and there's plenty of world class athletes who pound calories, including vast amounts of carbs, who stay incredibly lean. Michael Phelps immediately came to mind. Triathletes are another group. Vegans eat a disproportionate amount of carbs also.

Carbohydrate/Insulin is not the problem(barring medical conditions). It's being a lazy slob who doesn't eat to activity level.

Plus... You burn a lot of fat during sleep.
 
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testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
616
453
Of course they will, and there's plenty of world class athletes who pound calories, including vast amounts of carbs, who stay incredibly lean. Michael Phelps immediately came to mind. Triathletes are another group. Vegans eat a disproportionate amount of carbs also.
Carbohydrate/Insulin is not the problem(barring medical conditions). It's being a lazy slob who doesn't eat to activity level.
Plus... You burn a lot of fat during sleep.
Of course it varies from athletic to the ordinary daily public. However, look at the overweight and obesity crisis in America in particular.
This discussion being had in this thread and the other isn’t simply with bb’ers, nor athletes like Michael Phelps. It’s a broad and general discussion about the effects of macros on body weight and composition.
We don’t burn fat at night in our sleep if we’ve consumed constituents that interfere with lipolysis through the day and particularly into the evening hours. Seed oils, processed foods, and the vast majority of carbs are all culprits at hindering lipolysis.
I assume you’re active? Experiment; tally up the caloric content of a couple beers, or a couple heaping tablespoons of peanut butter. Reduce that amount of calories from your daytime consumption, and then have the couple beers or peanut butter before bed several days a week.
 
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gunslinger

gunslinger

VIP Member
Sep 19, 2010
1,416
526
In my 30 years of lifting and talking with others about it I don't think I have ever seen so much ignorance and condescending attitudes in one place. There are a couple of people who actually get it. The rest seem like they are all regurgerting some garbage research paper they read in college. I mean seriously some of the shit I've read in this and the other thread have blown me away. No wonder new guys and gals just getting into bodybuilding and fitness are so confused.
 
testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
616
453
So, lets say a person eats simple carbs all day long but they keep the total calories below their deficit for metabolic rate....Will they not be able to burn fat due to their insulin staying spiked through the day even tho they are in a deficit?....
Broadly, that’s correct. Fat burning will be significantly reduced. This is why fasting is more effective for burning fat in particular, than a reduced calorie diet is. That’s discussed in Fung’s video I posted.
 
testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
616
453
In my 30 years of lifting and talking with others about it I don't think I have ever seen so much ignorance and condescending attitudes in one place. There are a couple of people who actually get it. The rest seem like they are all regurgerting some garbage research paper they read in college. I mean seriously some of the shit I've read in this and the other thread have blown me away. No wonder new guys and gals just getting into bodybuilding and fitness are so confused.
In general, the bulk of mainstream institutional information on nutrition and health matters at large, is terribly misleading. The byproduct is a ton of confusion and continued health crisis (kinda by design, but I won’t get into that).
The vast majority are victims of much misinfo.
Simple example; If asked the question — how many days can a person survive without water, most people will say 3 because that’s what’s been most promulgated.
I’ve personally done multiple 5 day dry fasts (no food and NO LIQUID),and have a buddy hardcore into alternative forms of self sustaining practices who regularly dry fasts 7-9 days. He’s done several 12,000+ ft mountain climbs and a marathon while 3 days deep into dry fasts.
There is much to dispel with regard to diet and health in general. One of the most prominent debates is whether saturated fat and cholesterol is the cause of cardiovascular disease conditions or not. The general institutional info says it does — a deeper look into it reveals it does not. Great resources on this among numerous others: Paul Saladino (“Carnivore MD”),and Ivor Cummins (“The Fat Emporer”).
Fascinating topic…. Lipids and cholesterol.
 
CJ Smalls

CJ Smalls

Member
Aug 15, 2020
41
36
Of course it varies from athletic to the ordinary daily public. However, look at the overweight and obesity crisis in America in particular.
This discussion being had in this thread and the other isn’t simply with bb’ers, nor athletes like Michael Phelps. It’s a broad and general discussion about the effects of macros on body weight and composition.
We don’t burn fat at night in our sleep if we’ve consumed constituents that interfere with lipolysis through the day and particularly into the evening hours. Seed oils, processed foods, and the vast majority of carbs are all culprits at hindering lipolysis.
I assume you’re active? Experiment; tally up the caloric content of a couple beers, or a couple heaping tablespoons of peanut butter. Reduce that amount of calories from your daytime consumption, and then have the couple beers or peanut butter before bed several days a week.
I don't particularly care for beer or peanut butter daily, but I've had a pint or more of Ben&Jerry's ice cream before bed almost every night for months straight, and I was absolutely leaning out. It pissed people off, most notably my wife.

But again, my activity level warranted that. So it seems like it keeps coming back to activity level supporting food choices... Including junk food if desired. AKA Cals in vs Cals out.

For the record, it was close to 5k Cals per day, I was EXTREMELY active during that time period.
 
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testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
616
453
I don't particularly care for beer or peanut butter daily, but I've had a pint or more of Ben&Jerry's ice cream before bed almost every night for months straight, and I was absolutely leaning out. It pissed people off, most notably my wife.

But again, my activity level warranted that. So it seems like it keeps coming back to activity level supporting food choices... Including junk food if desired. AKA Cals in vs Cals out.

For the record, it was close to 5k Cals per day, I was EXTREMELY active during that time period.
And peds?
 
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