Latest posts

Forum Statistics

Threads
23,880
Posts
470,029
Members
27,204
Latest Member
lilyzeze
What's New?

Women, Weight Lifting and Dementia

SS/DV

SS/DV

Member
Jan 19, 2011
34
1
#1
Good article, good info. Applies to my wife, hopefully no others here.

Several studies have shown that exercise might reduce your risk of memory loss, or even improve your memory and thinking. Most of these studies have focused on aerobic exercise such as walking or aerobics classes.

What about lifting weights? Research by Teresa Liu-Ambrose, Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia, and her colleagues suggests lifting weights once or twice per week can improve attention and thinking in older women.

Lifting weights might not have an immediate effect. In this clinical trial, the women who lifted weights were split into two groups: those who trained once per week and those who trained twice per week. Both groups were compared to a group of women participating in a twice weekly balance and toning program. At the six month point, Dr. Liu-Ambrose and her colleagues found no significant differences between those lifting weights and those in the balance and toning program. At the one year point, however, the once per week group had improved performance by 12.6% and the twice per week group by 10.9%. The performance of the balance and toning group worsened slightly.

In a follow-up study one year after the formal training sessions ended, the once per week group still showed a 15% improvement on tests of attention and thinking over the balance and toning group.

There’s still a lot researchers don’t know about lifting weights and cognition. First, while the once per week group maintained improvement on test scores a year after the formal training sessions ended, the twice per week group did not. “This is likely due to the fact the once per week resistance training group maintained a higher level of physical activity after the formal cessation of the study,” says Dr. Liu-Ambrose. More research is needed to understand the factors behind these differences.

Second, MRI brain scans showed the brains of the women in the weight-lifting groups shrank a bit, while the brains of those in the balance and toning group did not. Brain shrinkage is normally associated with a decline in memory and thinking. Similar shrinkage has been reported in groups receiving active treatments in some clinical trials, but scientists are unsure of what it means.

Third, women ages 65 to 75 were enrolled in this study, and it’s not clear that lifting weights would have the same effect for men or for women of other ages. Other studies have shown that exercise may affect men and women differently. “From my clinical perspective, compliance may be a key reason why women cognitively benefit more from exercise, says Dr. Liu-Ambrose, who is a registered physical therapist. “Also, we know from animal studies that socialization is beneficial for both cognitive and brain function. So it could be that the social aspect of group-based exercise classes has a more beneficial effect for women versus men. There is also evidence that estrogen may be a key factor.”

Finally, the women in the study did not have significant problems with memory and thinking. It’s not clear whether lifting weights would improve the attention and thinking of people who have more serious problems. Dr. Liu-Ambrose and her colleagues plan to study the effects of exercise on people with more progressive cognitive impairment or dementia.
 
Ms.Wetback

Ms.Wetback

VIP Lady Member
Sep 27, 2010
1,599
118
#2
I lift because I like the way I feel and look; anything additional is a bonus.
 
Rottenrogue

Rottenrogue

Strongwoman
Jan 26, 2011
6,550
1,836
#3
Agree Ms.W. I am constantly hearing peple say how heavy weight lifting is trashing my body.Well I am 37 been doing this since 2002 and am still alive and kicking.Of course it is my smoking couch potatoe friends telling me how bad it is for me.I tell them they have thier vices I have mine.
 
AllTheWay

AllTheWay

TID Lady Member
Mar 17, 2011
4,240
411
#5
are you kidding me? who would waste money on such a stupid study!? where is the p values showing that this study has any statistical significance!? i think it is because the ones who work out more have better things to remember than whatever the dr wanted them to!
 
SS/DV

SS/DV

Member
Jan 19, 2011
34
1
#6
Money wasted, good point. From my personal perspective, any shekels spent trying to find a way to slow the progression of this disease is not a bad investment. Considering that women who normally read this forum aren't in the 'couch potato' category this should prove interesting since they're naturally combating this. Statistical significance? To date there's nothing that's been really proven that's statistically significant. The ones working out have better things to think about is the crux of the issue? My wife ran 50 miles a day (exercise) and was an active day trader and option trader till she no longer recognizes who I am (after all, we've only been married 34 years) and can't tell the difference between the computer screen and the tv. Other than those points, you're absolutely right.
Have a nice day.
 
Rottenrogue

Rottenrogue

Strongwoman
Jan 26, 2011
6,550
1,836
#7
SS/DV I want to apologize.I missed the first part that said your wife is dealing with dementia.I feel for you .I apologize if my post was offensive to you.My heart goes out to anyone dealing with a loved one that has dementia. My grandfather became a very lost man .Having a spouse go through it has got to be hell. If you need to vent or just talk feel free to pm me please.
 
SS/DV

SS/DV

Member
Jan 19, 2011
34
1
#8
SS/DV I want to apologize.I missed the first part that said your wife is dealing with dementia.I feel for you .I apologize if my post was offensive to you.My heart goes out to anyone dealing with a loved one that has dementia. My grandfather became a very lost man .Having a spouse go through it has got to be hell. If you need to vent or just talk feel free to pm me please.
Rottenrogue, (you've got a great name, by the way),please don't apologize. There's nothing you said that is offensive. Besides you're combating a M. Chiefs thick skin and I don't think your A game is up to that, even if it's a dangerous thing to say.
I'm sorry about your grandfather, to watch someone fade away like this is horrible. This is a disease of the survivors, not so much the individual who has it since they don't realize precisely what's going on. Thanks also for your kind offer, fortunately I've a number of friends who bear the brunt of my periodic 'events'. If I had a dollar for every time I'd wondered just what I did to piss someone off so much to have this happen, I'd be a millionaire.
No, I'm just including this article because if affects all of us and women like yourself may, just may be fortifying yourselves against this. My point? Keep it up, keep doing what you're doing. Running obviously doesn't do much, thinking doesn't either honestly like I mentioned, my wife was a financial genius fielding questions from a lot of head sheds in NYC daily. No one calls now.
Anyway, no problems from this end, I agree with the Doc, there's no proof for anything, put enough straws together and I'll make you a rope to get outta the pit, or at least a good try.
Thank you Maam.
 
milleniumgirl

milleniumgirl

Guest
Sep 12, 2010
617
18
#9
I think that memory loss is linked to getting older and no matter how much you exercise, it won't change much. I have to write down important stuff or else I don't remember all the details after a while. My doc says that it has also something to do with the meds that I'm taking (anti-anxiety, anti-depressants).
That said, walking and lifting weights make me feel "high" and people keep saying that i don't look my age which is good ...
 
AllTheWay

AllTheWay

TID Lady Member
Mar 17, 2011
4,240
411
#10
my memory sucks and im not taking anything other than joint supps and a few workout supps. i remember things important to my job/career but there are tons of stuff that doesnt stick. my grandmother recently died from alzheimers and my mom is in the early stages, i dread the thought of it! my grandmother was an avid crossworder and read and did the financial stuff of their house and it still got her. i think being active is very improtant to overall attitude and outlook, whether it helps slow or stop mental diseases, i dont know.

i am sorry to hear about your wife ss/dv. i know that my mother is very worried and stressed about her future and the extremely high potential for alzheimers!
 
SS/DV

SS/DV

Member
Jan 19, 2011
34
1
#11
Thank all of you for your kind words. This disease sucks worse than most. Keeping fit and healthy precludes a lot of diseases, we all know that, and if it slows this down a bit it's a definite bonus. My wifes mom is 94 and kicking strong and cries when she talks to her daughter, it's not just an age thing, there's something else going on. Heredity is a, uh, well you know. If you're from a family with this background, definitely something to worry about but not a heck of a lot you can do. I'm looking at a nice clean heart attack from the men side of my clan, I'll take that over the alternatives.
Side note, I've done a lot of research on this stuff, over engineering is an art form for me, if anyone has questions about this let me know, there's a lot going on and some have potential. Probably 6 months after my wife goes, but that's just the way things are.
 
Top