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TUT - Time Under Tension Training

hawkeye

hawkeye

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Sep 19, 2011
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Just starting to read more about TUT. I get the concept completely but when should should a guy use it? Any program or program specific? I see Matt Wenning was utilizing it with chains for his bench. My question on this was the use of chains the method for Time Under Tension Training or should it still be more focused on an actually 5 second count or etc?
 
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rawdeal

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Suspect everyone here will have a more aligned understanding of TUT than I do, but just to provoke more discussion:

where do you spend your time under? during the concentric or eccentric, or at (which?) stages of a rep? Chains, bands, self imposed with a count of X seconds, how many reps? Done all year or just sometimes, all workouts or just once a week, applies to some lifts or all, to assistance work of just the big lifts?
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

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I'm going to guess that TUT = time under tension. I'm guess this is over the lift in it's entirety and not just one portion of the lift ie... eccentric or concentric portion of the lift. I could be wrong b/c like I said this is a guess of mine.

On a side note, I was listening to the strength and conditioning coach from Minnesota talk about about his program that has been working wonders with athletes across the board. Part of is includes a phase where the focus in on the eccentric (lowering portion) of the lifts. He makes them take something like 10 seconds to lower a weight be it a squat, rdl, or a bench. I think his program is called tri-phasing.
 
sityslicker1

sityslicker1

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I've been years with very good results and it's so much easier on the joints bc it's so challenging and you don't have to go as heavy. I just exploded on the concentric portion and 3-5 sec negative in one continous motion, no locking out until failure. 5-15 working set per muscle group in the 8-12 rep range or at least try but biggest key was hitting failure every single set.

I don't do use bands nor chains. It only helps with the concentric or explosive upwords portion of the lift were most of us of good, it's the negative that needs to be emphasize Imo more so than the concentric. So 3-5 secs down without any ancillary equipment.
 
hawkeye

hawkeye

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Fellas, you are correct. It is Time under tension. Just trying to see how it is incorporated in lifts and when you do it and etc. Similar to what Rawdeal posted.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

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Hawk... I'm thinking of trying to incorporate the eccentric tri-phasing program into my training. I'm thinking of substituting the f.drop set I currently do with an eccentric portion. I should also mention.. this would only be done for 1 block of the 3 block training. I would perform it for 3 weeks basically.
 
shortz

shortz

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May 6, 2013
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TUT can be utilized in a few different ways. It's basically the amount of time you are under the stress of the resistance, not necessarily how long you are performing reps. For instance, rest pauses increase TUT, but yet, you are not performing reps that entire time because you are resting with the weight still in your hands to try to perform extra reps.

I utilize it by going slower and using very strict form. My sets take almost 50% longer than most folks at the gym because they seem to think that each set is a race to the finish line with as much weight as you can handle. Oddly enough, I am bigger than most of those folks, but yet, I am using less weight than they are most times.

So, IMO, it works. It also helps prevent injuries when you are slowing it down, taking your time, but maybe using slightly less weight.
 
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rawdeal

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TUT can be utilized in a few different ways. It's basically the amount of time you are under the stress of the resistance, not necessarily how long you are performing reps. For instance, rest pauses increase TUT, but yet, you are not performing reps that entire time because you are resting with the weight still in your hands to try to perform extra reps.

I utilize it by going slower and using very strict form. My sets take almost 50% longer than most folks at the gym because they seem to think that each set is a race to the finish line with as much weight as you can handle. Oddly enough, I am bigger than most of those folks, but yet, I am using less weight than they are most times.

So, IMO, it works. It also helps prevent injuries when you are slowing it down, taking your time, but maybe using slightly less weight.


Yes, YES, and also Yes. Have no well documented evidence of my own on this, but have read and sometimes seen on youtube that putting as much weight as possible with positive reps works best for strength, while minimizing the negatives, (AND ignoring the whole TUT thing), while emphasizing the negatives is better for size.

Thoughts on this, and on the OP, how to incorporate all of it in a long range plan?
 
shortz

shortz

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Yes, YES, and also Yes. Have no well documented evidence of my own on this, but have read and sometimes seen on youtube that putting as much weight as possible with positive reps works best for strength, while minimizing the negatives, (AND ignoring the whole TUT thing), while emphasizing the negatives is better for size.

Thoughts on this, and on the OP, how to incorporate all of it in a long range plan?

Even elite level strength coaches for the NFL have gone back to slower, controlled movements over speed training and the results were actually faster 40s.

As far as negatives/eccentric training, I am personally not a fan. It takes supra heavy weights and a very strong, trusted spotter(s). I feel it's a set up for injury. I don't think the benefits outweigh the risk.

Hopefully I read your post correctly and answered your question
 
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rawdeal

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Even elite level strength coaches for the NFL have gone back to slower, controlled movements over speed training and the results were actually faster 40s.

As far as negatives/eccentric training, I am personally not a fan. It takes supra heavy weights and a very strong, trusted spotter(s). I feel it's a set up for injury. I don't think the benefits outweigh the risk.

Hopefully I read your post correctly and answered your question


lol, not sure there is any way to read much of my stuff correctly, in this case and some others, I just throw my thoughts out there and see what other ppl think. As to negatives vs safety, depends maybe on how you do it. Do you load supra weights, i.e. around or exceeding your max single and then do a low rep set of negs only with some trustworthy spotters nearby, or do you max out with a weight you can do some reps with before failing and needing those spotters to get a few added negatives at the end. For my money THE best spotter is a rack set at just the right height, do all your regular sets per some program, finish with one tortuous negative rep, top to whatever bottom you set, then call it a day, unless you like to do a lighter weight higher rep flush set to finish.

Going back to Hawk's OP, negatives are only one part of the TUT menu, a fascinating thread brewing here, thnx shortz.
 
hawkeye

hawkeye

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Agreed, guys. Really enjoying the conversation!
 
shortz

shortz

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lol, not sure there is any way to read much of my stuff correctly, in this case and some others, I just throw my thoughts out there and see what other ppl think. As to negatives vs safety, depends maybe on how you do it. Do you load supra weights, i.e. around or exceeding your max single and then do a low rep set of negs only with some trustworthy spotters nearby, or do you max out with a weight you can do some reps with before failing and needing those spotters to get a few added negatives at the end. For my money THE best spotter is a rack set at just the right height, do all your regular sets per some program, finish with one tortuous negative rep, top to whatever bottom you set, then call it a day, unless you like to do a lighter weight higher rep flush set to finish.

Going back to Hawk's OP, negatives are only one part of the TUT menu, a fascinating thread brewing here, thnx shortz.

Some folks will use 110% of their one rep max to do eccentrics. This is the supra heavy weights I was referring to. If you were just using 90 to 100% of your one rep max, probably not quite as bad, but 100% is still getting pretty heavy.

There are several other methods you can use to increase TUT. Tempo, increased reps, drop sets, rest pauses...tempo and rest pauses are by far my favorite. The only time I use drop sets are for smaller muscle groups
 
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