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Train Muscles To Failure?

SS/DV

SS/DV

Member
Jan 19, 2011
34
1
#13
Re: Train to Failure?

I talked to a mod at another board about this and he said not to train to failure ... he also told me not to exceed 15 reps when I train ... while another guy told me exactly the opposite. This is really confusing.
My point exactly, there's a lot of information out there, which ones are correct? I've lifted since I was 16, but never, ever did it right. (Post the poster next to the bench, if it says 3x8 I did 3x8. Increase weight? Can't do 3x8, so that's wrong. Guess how far I got?) Now I kinda know better, what 45 years later? (Quick study, huh?)
Okay, say today I'm doing my arms, one type of exercise for say the biceps, go to failure and that's it? Or 3 different types of exercises going to failure on all 3? (note, the following two exercises will be quick and dirty, just saying.) Failure. Is it where I can't lift it off the mat, or where I can't complete the exercise? I.e., like my seated barbell curls, helping it up just enough to finish, or just go to the stick point? Keep going till I can't pull it up at all? Sets/reps, so on and so forth, don't have time to play, gotta get it right the first time kinda thang.
Note, I don't want to be a body builder, nor a power lifter, just want/need to add a lot of muscle, eliminate as much fat as I can and keep in shape. If I could get to 230# and 10% bf I will have arrived. (Note, currently 235 and 30% bf, yech!)
 
Purplehaze

Purplehaze

Member
Aug 25, 2010
92
15
#14
Newb style question, sorry about that.
When exercising a specific body part, should I do just one type of exercise and set/rep it to failure each exercise period? Example, yesterday I was doing seated barbell curls, did 3x8. The last set I needed to 'help' myself past a sticking point, which grew larger till I finished the set. Should I do that, or go lighter and move on to a different type of bicep exercise?

Also, any quick way to 'energize' my triceps? They're holding me back on my benchpress, so chest is less than exercised while arms fall off shoulders.
Thanks.
Different schools of thought on this...Do a search and read over some of Dante's info on DoggCrapp Training....
 
barbellbeast

barbellbeast

MuscleHead
Oct 4, 2010
343
43
#15
CHANGE.

Change is the most important part of progress. Don't go til failure every set, every workout.
 
barbellbeast

barbellbeast

MuscleHead
Oct 4, 2010
343
43
#18
So in other words only go to failure on the days you do max outs?
Not saying that. I never even max out in the first place. I'm just suggesting that changing your intensity is a good thing IMHO. Failure on every set, every workout taxes the body too much for me.
 
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