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There are Many Different Types Of Deadlifts

Mike Singletary

Mike Singletary

Member
Sep 8, 2010
92
29
#1
Conventional Deadlift (When the term “deadlift” is used, it is usually referred to a conventional variant. This technique heavily employs the leg muscles, amongst many other secondary muscles, like back and arms).

Sumo Deadlift (The legs are spread far apart to the sides, almost reaching the weight plates on the barbell, with arms reaching down inside of legs, mimicking a stance of sumo fighters. In oppose to conventional sumo deadlift involves heavier use of legs (especially hamstrings) and glutes instead of the back. If you have a massive waist or if you are really tall but have short arms I recommend you to do sumo. This technique may place greater stress on the connective tissues of the pelvic bone, so be careful how you do it).

Romanian Deadlift (This variant is used by Olympic weightlifters. Emphasis is on the hamstrings, glutes and lower back. At lowest position waist should be straight with back parallel to floor. The bar is grabbed by extending the hips and bending the knees while the back is fully arched. It is raised by contracting glutes and hamstrings. Usually, a very wide snatch grip is used).

Stiff-Leg Deadlift (This is another variant very similar to Romanian style that is primarily used in bodybuilding for developing hamstrings and glutes. The only difference between these two is that with stiff-leg you bend from the waist and with Romanian deadlift from the hips).

Single Leg Deadlift (This is actually a stiff-leg deadlift only performed standing on one leg. Dumbbells or barbell is used, either with one or two hands).

Trap Bar Deadlift (Trap bar has a hollow part in the middle where a lifter can step in and grab the two side handles. This creates more room for the knees to pass through thus recruiting the legs and glutes more than back).

Side Deadlift (Also known as the suitcase deadlift, it is very similar to trapbar version where instead of the bar two dumbbells or suitcases, like in Strongman competition, are deadlifted).

Rack Pull (Also called a partial deadlift, it is performed in squat rack or power rack for strengthening the lockout part of the motion. Due to its shortened range of motion considerably higher amount of weight can be lifted. The only limitation lies in the grip. To overcome this weakness, wrist straps can be used in
 
Number LL

Number LL

VIP Member
Dec 4, 2010
465
71
#2
I love the trap bar deadlift. Kind of a combo deadlift and squat.
 
porky little keg

porky little keg

MuscleHead
May 21, 2011
1,225
646
#4
I know it's an old thread... but

snatch grip deadlift - conventional deadlift with your grip set wide, as in as wide as you bench or wider. Usually done with straps.

Deficit deadlift - usually conventional but can be done sumo. Deadlift standing on anything from a 1/2" mat to a 5" block. More ROM making more room to grow.

Block pulls - like rack pulls but you put the weight up on blocks from 3"-8". Same idea as rack pulls but you still get the loading of the bar like you do from the floor as opposed to the bar already being under tension in the rack.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,409
2,626
#5
I know it's an old thread... but

snatch grip deadlift - conventional deadlift with your grip set wide, as in as wide as you bench or wider. Usually done with straps.

Deficit deadlift - usually conventional but can be done sumo. Deadlift standing on anything from a 1/2" mat to a 5" block. More ROM making more room to grow.

Block pulls - like rack pulls but you put the weight up on blocks from 3"-8". Same idea as rack pulls but you still get the loading of the bar like you do from the floor as opposed to the bar already being under tension in the rack.
The Blocks can be taller than that. A lot of PLers use Oly blocks (small, med, large). The large put the bar well above your knee (half way up the thigh for someone's who is 6'2.
 
Mini Forklift Ⓥ

Mini Forklift Ⓥ

The Veganator
Dec 23, 2012
4,313
728
#6
Maybe someone can write up the differences in grip used for DL's eg double overhand, hook etc.

I'm just walking out the door to train so if nobody feels like doing that I can write up later on. Chur, nice thread too btw MF.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,409
2,626
#7
Maybe someone can write up the differences in grip used for DL's eg double overhand, hook etc.

I'm just walking out the door to train so if nobody feels like doing that I can write up later on. Chur, nice thread too btw MF.
There's really only 3 grips; Mixed (over/under),Double Over, and Hook Grip.

Mixed Grip - Strong hand with a pronated grip position (over),and the weaker hand with a supinated grip (under). It keeps the bar from rolling out of the lifter's hands. The problem with this grip is that it can place A LOT of strain on the under's bicep tendon. It also shifts the underhand's shoulder out in front.

Double Overhand - Grasp the bar with both hands in the pronated position. This grip is difiicult to maintain when the bar gets heavy. The bar will eventually force the hands open.

Hook Grip - A variation of the double overhand and the solution to the bar forcing the hands open. You wrap your first 2 finger over your thumb to hold the bar in place. You are hooking your fingers over the thumb. This puts the body in the best mechanical position to perform a pull whether it's conventional, sumo, or Oly. The hook grip is touted as the strongest grip you can use on a bar since as long as the finger stay tight/firm over the thumb the grip will not release the bar. The hook grip is used by ALL Olympic weightlifters when performing the snatch and the C&J.
 
69nites

69nites

VIP Member
Aug 17, 2011
1,988
568
#9
To add to the grip discussion. ..

I start with double overhand. At the point that the bar is becoming heavy enough or I've gone through enough volume that the bar starts to roll out of my hand I switch to hook grip.

This helps train grip strength but allows you to continue training past your grip's limit.

And just an fyi. Hook grip hurts. You're crushing your thumbs against the bar.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,409
2,626
#10
To add to the grip discussion. ..

I start with double overhand. At the point that the bar is becoming heavy enough or I've gone through enough volume that the bar starts to roll out of my hand I switch to hook grip.

This helps train grip strength but allows you to continue training past your grip's limit.

And just an fyi. Hook grip hurts. You're crushing your thumbs against the bar.
Your thumb isn't being crushed. It hurts b/c the weight of the bar is pulling on the thumb joint and that's causing the pain. More weight, more pain. In time it's lessened and not so bad which could be b/c you get used to it or the thumbs nerves are deadened.... or maybe both.
 
69nites

69nites

VIP Member
Aug 17, 2011
1,988
568
#11
Your thumb isn't being crushed. It hurts b/c the weight of the bar is pulling on the thumb joint and that's causing the pain. More weight, more pain. In time it's lessened and not so bad which could be b/c you get used to it or the thumbs nerves are deadened.... or maybe both.
Maybe I need to loosen up then, because the front thumb joint gets wrecked where my fingers are squeezing it against the bar.
 
rawdeal

rawdeal

TID Board Of Directors
Nov 29, 2013
2,018
899
#12
Hook never bothered me those ways, but it did feel like the forefinger was trying to pull the thumb's nail off.
 
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