Slow Deadlifts... Super Slow

Discussion in 'Powerlifting Training and Strength techniques' started by BrotherIron, Feb 28, 2016.

  1. ChrisLindsay9

    ChrisLindsay9 VIP Member

    Jun 17, 2013
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    OK, what the hell ... I'll put myself in devil's advocate position.

    First, I wonder if it would be beneficial to just break it up into parts of the lift, in order to reduce the risk of either injury or screwing up the technique? If you want to go super slow from the floor, do a slow pull to the knees and pause, then back down (like PoB mentioned). Maybe do it from a deficit? If you want to lock out super slow, do a slow pull off blocks?

    If the answer is you need the full range of motion to go slow, then my question would be ... at what point do you need to ever be slow during a deadlift's range of motion?

    Slow tempo lifting in squats and bench seem beneficial because to some extent, that's part of the lift. For bench press, you have to come down controlled, pause at the bottom, before finishing the lift. For squat, you have to come down controlled and make sure you not only hit depth, but do it so that a judge can see that you hit depth. In both instances, momentum at the start of those lifts must decrease, before it then increases.

    But for deadlift, once you pull, you want as much positive momentum as you can get from beginning to end. Force = Mass x Acceleration. Even if a part of the lift is slow, how does it training to go slow help you move it faster? If it's a sticking point, you put some chains or bands or whatever on it, and pull like hell to get through it.

    It seems to me that slowing the tempo in squat and bench carry over because you incorporate that slow tempo (to some extent) in your competition lift. But with deadlift, you never think about slowing the tempo down.
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2016
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  2. Ramrod

    Ramrod VIP Member

    Jun 5, 2012
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    Some really good points. I've tried paused Deads just below the Knees, but not often enough to see any help from it. The Slow and Paused Pulls are just about making those sticking points tougher and time under tension. Bands would do something similar IMO. If you don't have Bands or Chains etc...Try the pause or slow reps. Their is more then one way to skin a cat.
     
  3. Yomo

    Yomo VIP Member

    Dec 18, 2015
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    you also have the dreaded double pause deadlift, where most who implement this style pause both just off the floor and again below the knee before locking out...

    I also saw a style of pause where the lift begins as a knee pull, the weight is set back down, while remaining tight, begin the knee pull again with a slight pause and accelerate into the lockout which would result in a single rep....

    Both of the variations seem to be very taxing and I can only assume can help many lifters address various weaknesses, primarily focusing on tightness and correct form....
     
  4. BrotherIron

    BrotherIron TID Board Of Directors

    Mar 6, 2011
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    You could always perform slow to fast pulls. Start slow and then accelerate which like Ramrod said.. is just like what happens when you add chains or bands. Bands are taxing and I would suggest dropping the bar after completing the lift. If you control the decent the band catapults the bar towards the floor and if you get out of position just a little bit... you wind up hurt. Chains are more forgiving.
     
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  5. Ramrod

    Ramrod VIP Member

    Jun 5, 2012
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    Great Advice......
     
  6. ChrisLindsay9

    ChrisLindsay9 VIP Member

    Jun 17, 2013
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    This just has the feel of the "if it's harder, it's better" dogma that brings out the broscience in powerlifting. I'm not saying it doesn't have benefit, but I have to think whatever symptom in one's deadlift that would require someone to consider doing this is either lacking in resources/equipments (bands, chains, etc.) or time (to do extra assistance/accessory work). Otherwise, they are just being pansies and are looking for an excuse to justify lifting lighter weight. :p
     
  7. Yomo

    Yomo VIP Member

    Dec 18, 2015
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    I believe Greg Nuckols wrote an article about the "Double Paused" deadlift....def not my cup of tea, but a variation nonetheless...


    on a side note....anyone see Pete Rubish pause 655lbs at the knee for 10 seconds before locking it out?
     
  8. porky little keg

    porky little keg TID Board Of Directors

    May 21, 2011
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    Slow descent deadlifts are a Frantz staple..... take a weight thats over your max, get help locking it out and then sloooowly lower it.....

    As for Bell's slow deadlifts..... I think it's a load of craaaaaaaaaap and he's just trying to be innovative ( without actually improving).....


    Slow temps are great for accessory work but horseshit for main movements. Everything we do is to try to build up more speed in the lifts. Don't train yourself to be slow.
     
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  9. schultz1

    schultz1 Bangs Raiden's mom VIP

    Jan 3, 2011
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    This is so odd to me. As i associate any type of training for a sport to build speed and explosiveness. Not saying im right or, that it applies to powerlifting. To me it seems building speed and explosiveness is far more beneficial.

    I quoted the wrong post. Sorry. Also, didnt see plk's post or I would have just liked that. Douchebag that i am.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2016

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