Latest posts

Forum Statistics

Threads
23,900
Posts
470,230
Members
27,211
Latest Member
Doctorvalley
What's New?

Six more plead guilty in Federal steroid case

mugzy

mugzy

Administrator
Staff Member
Aug 11, 2010
4,794
1,662
#1
LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - Six additional men were in Federal court in Lake Charles on Tuesday morning where they pleaded guilty to being part of a conspiracy to illegally distribute anabolic steroids in Louisiana and Texas.

Bryce Thomas Meaux, Terry Duane Kuykendall, Tyler Jordan Kuykendall, Ronald Lee Bert Fontenot, Troy Newton Broussard and Shane Patrick Hinton pleaded guilty in Federal court on Tuesday morning.

Five men plead guilty to similar charges on Monday morning. Jordan Blake Berza and Christopher Gass pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute the steroids and to money laundering. Blake Meche, Canien Lee Matte and Shayne Keith Weekly pleaded guilty to the conspiracy count.

The following is a news release from the United States Attorney's Office:

Lake Charles, La.: United States Attorney Stephanie A. Finley announced today, the guilty pleas of the remaining defendants who were involved in a large scale conspiracy to possess and distribute anabolic steroids in the Western, Middle and Eastern Districts of Texas and Louisiana.

Bryce Thomas Meaux, 24, Shane Patrick Hinton, 23, Tyler Jordan Kuykendall, 20, all of Lake Charles, La.; Terry Duane Kuykendall, 24, of Baton Rouge, La.; Troy Newton Broussard, 27, of Lafayette, La.; and Ronald Lee Bert Fontenot, 23, of Eunice, La.; pleaded guilty today before U.S. District Judge Patricia Minaldi in Lake Charles, La. Guilty pleas were accepted yesterday by Judge Minaldi from Jordan Blake Berza, 26, Christopher Keith Gass, 25, both of Lake Charles, La.; Blake Meche, 25, of Rayne, La.; Cainen Lee Matte, 24, of Baton Rouge, La.; and Shane Keith Weekly, 24 of Lake Arthur, La. Defendant, Daniel Kent Bosely previously pleaded guilty before Judge Minaldi on June 9, 2011. All defendants pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute and the distribution of anabolic steroids. Two defendants, Berza and Gass, also pleaded guilty to one count of money laundering.

According to court documents, these defendants were involved in a drug trafficking organization responsible for receiving several hundred ten milliliter (10 ml) vials of anabolic steroids, numerous packages of anabolic steroid cream, and approximately 35 kilograms of raw steroid powder which was shipped from China and Germany.

Once the internationally shipped packages of anabolic steroid powder were received by members of the organization, the powder was then converted into an injectable form, bottled, labeled for distribution, and sold. This drug trafficking organization sold anabolic steroids to individuals located in the Western, Middle and Eastern Districts of Louisiana and Texas. In total, approximately 7,000 ten milliliter (10 ml) vials of anabolic steroids were manufactured, possessed, and distributed by this drug trafficking organization. More than 600 ten milliliter (10 ml) vials of anabolic steroids were seized from members of the organization through undercover purchases, traffic stops and search warrants. Agents also seized hundreds of empty vials, caps, syringes, three clandestine laboratories, and approximately one kilogram of raw steroid powder. Approximately $93,000.00 was seized from members of the organization, the majority of which came from bank seizure warrants on accounts belonging to Jordan Berza and Christopher Gass, to include $13,000.00 in cash seized from the residence of Berza. Berza, who co-owned Planet Nutrition in Lake Charles with co-defendant Christopher Gass, was utilizing the business as a distribution point for his anabolic steroids. Berza also delivered and mailed steroids to many of his distributors. All monies seized by law enforcement from Berza's residence and financial accounts registered to Berza and Gass, represent drug proceeds from the sale of anabolic steroids.

U. S. Attorney Stephanie Finley stated, "This is a very large steroid case. These defendants were illegally importing and distributing anabolic steroids imported from foreign countries to include China and Germany which were intentionally mislabeled. They were well organized, with a geographically diverse clientele and their sole motivation was greed. My office will continue to aggressively pursue and prosecute this type of illegal activity and will continue to send a strong message that this behavior will not be tolerated."

Special Agent in Charge of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations (ICE/HSI) in New Orleans, Raymond R. Parmer, Jr., stated, "ICE focuses not only on keeping illegal products out of the United States but also on identifying and dismantling the criminal organizations behind this activity. ICE/HSI uses its unique customs and immigration authorities to attack and dismantle smuggling organizations whether they smuggle drugs or people across our borders." Parmer oversees a five-state area which includes Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas and Tennessee.

Special Agent in Charge of Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation, James C. Lee stated, "We are pleased with the announcements of these guilty pleas. IRS Criminal Investigation is proud to utilize our forensic accounting skills in a joint investigation to put a stop to money laundering and other types of white collar fraud."

At sentencing, the defendants face up to 10 years imprisonment, a fine of up to $500,000.00, and a term of supervised release of not less than two nor more than three years, following confinement, for the conspiracy charge. Berza and Gass also face up to 10 years imprisonment, a fine of up to $250,000.00 or twice the value of the property involved, and a term of supervised release of not more than three years, following confinement, for the money laundering charges.

The case was investigated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations, U. S. Department of Treasury, Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation, and the Louisiana State Police. The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney J. Collin Sims.
 
Regulator

Regulator

VIP Member
Jan 26, 2011
2,037
317
#2
Damn it looks like alot of snitching went on inside that ring. Thanks admin!
 
PillarofBalance

PillarofBalance

Strength Pimp
Feb 27, 2011
17,066
4,630
#3
The case was investigated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations, U. S. Department of Treasury, Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation, and the Louisiana State Police. The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney J. Collin Sims.

So how much did that cost?

And what danger to the public safety was averted?
 
PillarofBalance

PillarofBalance

Strength Pimp
Feb 27, 2011
17,066
4,630
#5
Think of the chillllllllllllldren..

Slic.

LMAO I just had a chat with my boss today about how much I hate organizations that hold kids hostage to control us like that. Probably my number 3 pet peeve.
 
Mad-Bull

Mad-Bull

Senior Member
Jun 10, 2011
112
6
#7
Anyone know how the FED's initially caught on to them? It seems 90% of busts seem to happen from a seized shipment of powder which sparks an investigation.
 
FlyingDragon

FlyingDragon

VIP Member
Nov 4, 2010
3,368
1,574
#8
Anyone know how the FED's initially caught on to them? It seems 90% of busts seem to happen from a seized shipment of powder which sparks an investigation.
I disagree with your assumption. Look at the amount of people involved, that is where the problem lies. Too many big mouths running around. There were too many players involved, they were local (only takes one young punk kid getting pulled over to spark an investigation). There was no mention of internet activity, so it most likely erupted from someone getting caught and it snowballed from there....
 
Hanniballickedher

Hanniballickedher

MuscleHead
Dec 12, 2010
1,235
119
#9
I heard about this case and this is WAY to close to home!!!!
 
JackD

JackD

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 16, 2010
5,067
539
#10
I disagree with your assumption. Look at the amount of people involved, that is where the problem lies. Too many big mouths running around. There were too many players involved, they were local (only takes one young punk kid getting pulled over to spark an investigation). There was no mention of internet activity, so it most likely erupted from someone getting caught and it snowballed from there....
FD is right, these guys were local, and the base of the people involved was way to large, to many face to faces with trade. Not to mention the guy used his nutrition store as a front for his sales as well. Not smart.
 
any1uno

any1uno

VIP Member
Dec 22, 2010
1,431
201
#11
I didn't see where recs and firearms were involved which is normally what leads investigators to them in the first place. Am curious to know which UGL they were though.

Just wish they'd pick on real drug users instead of people who are trying to improve their health and quality of life...instead of destroying it with recs. Just my two cents for what it's worth that is.
 
Top