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sick and tired of the same thing

goldy

goldy

Chutzpah VIP
Jan 17, 2011
1,263
153
#1
I am losing my mind eating the same thing day in and day out. I had to give up canned tuna today, i don't know if i will EVER eat it again. Breakfast is fine, i enjoy that. it is my 3 middle meals during the day that kill me. 6oz of chicken boob and 3/4 to 1 cup green beans or broccoli. WTF else is there besides chicken breast? or how do you prepare them when dieting differently? i mostly use salsa or hot sauce. Going to get some ground turkey to make turkey burgers and throw some spicy mustard on em, but those are pretty shitty too :)

What else is there? is there a lean pork? anything? i dont want to move to shakes but i might have to....
 
MAYO

MAYO

Bad Mother
Sep 27, 2010
2,103
588
#2
I get crazy on cuts too. You can do lean pork, turkey( makes me tired tho),97/3 beef once or twice a week and thats pretty much it for meats aside from chicken. Mrs dash has a lot of salt free blends to cook with and that adds a little variety. Ground chicken is another variation that at least changes up the texture.
 
goldy

goldy

Chutzpah VIP
Jan 17, 2011
1,263
153
#3
I am Jewish and grew up in a kosher house. what cut of pork is lean? i know nothing about pork aside from loin is yummy and it is great to make meatballs with (i do 33%beef, 33%pork, 33%veal).
 
AXEMURDERER

AXEMURDERER

VIP Member
Jan 5, 2011
342
60
#4
Try some game animal. I used to be a big fan of venison. Other than that its all about the toppings. Its part of the sacrifice I guess.
 
MAYO

MAYO

Bad Mother
Sep 27, 2010
2,103
588
#5
I am Jewish and grew up in a kosher house. what cut of pork is lean? i know nothing about pork aside from loin is yummy and it is great to make meatballs with (i do 33%beef, 33%pork, 33%veal).
Tenderloin and pork chops would be your best bet on lean pork cuts. BTW stay away from ground turkey....its cut with beef fat to make it stick together. Try 93/7 ground beef and sprinkle oats into the meat and then make patties. The oats hold the patties together as the fat normally would.
 
jdjack

jdjack

MuscleHead
Sep 22, 2010
568
32
#6
I like to use a rotisserie, and make tons of different types of meats with it. I also use an injector to give it more flavor. An acid like vinegar, or lemon juice will tenderize the meat and really bring out any other things you like to add to it.
 
Get Some

Get Some

MuscleHead
Sep 9, 2010
3,441
640
#7
stuffed chicken....you cut the breasts open and put some spicy mustard, onion slices, minced garlic, basil, and even some veggies if you want. The chicken has a very different taste to it when baked this way if you ask me. Or as MAYO said you'll have to move to beef once or twice a week. I could eat beef everyday, so I'm sure you'll find some useful recipes to incorporate.

Another hint on the chicken is to grind it in the food processor with mustard (of your choice),a tiny bit of olive oil mayo, garlic cloves, onions, jalapenos, and a couple tsp of tapatio or similar hot sauce.....BOOOOM! Wetback Chicken Salad! lol (I used to eat this all the time and it's very good).
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,034
1,187
#8
I get crazy on cuts too. You can do lean pork, turkey( makes me tired tho),97/3 beef once or twice a week and thats pretty much it for meats aside from chicken. Mrs dash has a lot of salt free blends to cook with and that adds a little variety. Ground chicken is another variation that at least changes up the texture.
I used to think that turkey made me tired as well. I read some studies on it though (long time ago, but I'm sure I could find something current) and the amount of tryptophan in turkey, even large amounts of turkey, is not enough to chemically make you sleepy. The sheer amount of food, such as after thanksgiving dinner, can trigger a slowed metabolism and relaxation, which equals a nap (for me at least) but the old wives tale of turkey having tryptophan in it (it does, but so does your protein shake) and making you tired because of the amount of tryptophan, is just a myth.

All that being said, I am a firm believer in the placebo effect. So if you think turkey is going to make you tired, then when you get tired after you eat it, it is just as real as when I get tired from taking ketotifen.

I'll try to find a study backing that claim up too.
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,034
1,187
#9
Tenderloin and pork chops would be your best bet on lean pork cuts. BTW stay away from ground turkey....its cut with beef fat to make it stick together. Try 93/7 ground beef and sprinkle oats into the meat and then make patties. The oats hold the patties together as the fat normally would.
Damn Mayo, not picking on you or anything, but this post also got my attention. Is all ground turkey held together with beef fat? My ground turkey is 99% fat free, so I would imagine that even if it is, it is a minuscule amount. More info please as I eat around 3 pounds per week of ground turkey. Thanks bro.
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,034
1,187
#10
I used to think that turkey made me tired as well. I read some studies on it though (long time ago, but I'm sure I could find something current) and the amount of tryptophan in turkey, even large amounts of turkey, is not enough to chemically make you sleepy. The sheer amount of food, such as after thanksgiving dinner, can trigger a slowed metabolism and relaxation, which equals a nap (for me at least) but the old wives tale of turkey having tryptophan in it (it does, but so does your protein shake) and making you tired because of the amount of tryptophan, is just a myth.

All that being said, I am a firm believer in the placebo effect. So if you think turkey is going to make you tired, then when you get tired after you eat it, it is just as real as when I get tired from taking ketotifen.

I'll try to find a study backing that claim up too.
Found this with a quick google search. Does Turkey Make You Sleepy?: Scientific American



Does Turkey Make You Sleepy?
Stop blaming the bird for your turkey daze.
By Coco Ballantyne | November 21, 2007 | 6
Share Email Print

The Science of Thanksgiving
The answers to all your questions about the big bird: Does turkey make you sleepy? What's the difference between white and dark meat? And, stories about the bird itself »
November 25, 2008


TURKEY DAZE: Gluttony is more to blame for post-Thanksgiving tiredness than anything in the turkey itself.
Image: © iStockPhoto.com / Christine Balderas
Let us give thanks on Thanksgiving for its cornucopia of foods: mashed potatoes, gravy, stuffing, creamed corn, cranberry sauce and, of course, turkey, among other delights. Every fourth Thursday of November, friends and family in the U.S. travel thousands of miles to gather and gorge in a celebration tracing back to 1621 when Plymouth Pilgrims and Native Americans spent three days breaking bread in gratitude for the year's plentiful harvest.

Those early revelers were probably knocked out by their marathon feast, and most people today are familiar with the post-Thanksgiving food coma. But often the blame falls on the bird. Turkey allegedly causes drowsiness because it is packed with a nutrient called tryptophan.

Tryptophan is one of 20 naturally occurring amino acids—the building blocks of proteins. Because the body is unable to manufacture tryptophan on its own, it must be obtained from food protein. Turkey is a great source of this essential acid, but it is not unique: many meats and other protein products pack comparable amounts.

Tryptophan is used by the human body to make serotonin, a neurotransmitter. It has a somnolent effect on fruit flies, whose sleep is most likely equivalent to our slow-wave (non-REM) sleep, says neuroscientist Amita Sehgal of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Other studies show that one function of serotonin is the promotion of slow-wave sleep in nonhuman mammals, she adds, and it may do the same for humans.

Thus, it is no wonder that turkey, which provides the raw material for the synthesis of sleep-related serotonin, is purported to have soporific power.

But eating turkey does not translate to amplified serotonin production in the brain, says neuropharmacologist Richard Wurtman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences in Cambridge, Mass.

Turkey and other protein-rich foods contain many amino acids, and tryptophan is the scarcest among them, Wurtman says. After a turkey dinner, several amino acids circulate through the bloodstream. To get into the brain they must be shuttled across the blood–brain barrier by specialized transport proteins. Like passengers trying to board a crowded bus, amino acids compete for rides on these transporters. Not only does tryptophan have paltry representation among the passengers; it also competes with five other amino acids for the same transporter. Aced out by other amino acids, tryptophan thereby has a tough time hitching a ride to the brain.

Taken in isolation, tryptophan would increase brain serotonin, Wurtman says, but no food source contains tryptophan in the absence of other amino acids.

"Paradoxically, what probably makes people sleepy after Thanksgiving dinner is…dessert," he adds. "Eating carbohydrates increases brain serotonin in spite of the fact that there is no tryptophan in carbohydrates."

Gobbling a slice of sweet pumpkin pie, for instance, causes beta cells in the pancreas to secrete insulin, a hormone that allows the uptake of glucose and most amino acids into the tissues. But insulin has little effect on tryptophan, a large percentage of which travels the bloodstream bound to the protein albumin and therefore is unavailable to the tissues, the notable exception being the brain. By sopping up other amino acids from the blood, however, insulin reduces the tryptophan's competition; the transport system is no longer tied up and more tryptophan can cross the blood–brain barrier. As Wurtman and others have shown, when more tryptophan arrives in the brain, serotonin synthesis steps up and serotonin-mediated transmission is amplified among neurons.
 
barbellbeast

barbellbeast

MuscleHead
Oct 4, 2010
342
43
#11
Tilapia? Catfish? Salmon? I use Lawry Salt on just about everything.
 
W

Wolf

MuscleHead
Dec 25, 2010
274
45
#12
Go to the grocery store and pick up some spices and some low calorie sauces. I use a variety of spice mixes on my chicken, make a bunch of different vinaigrettes for my salads and vegetables.
 
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