Forum Statistics

Threads
24,288
Posts
477,555
Members
27,395
Latest Member
Johnbonez
What's New?

Questions and Comments: COVID-19: WHAT I SEE.....

S

searay

VIP Member
Dec 20, 2017
304
193
#13
Have you all seen the report where a rep. sided source showed pics of testing site in Brooklyn, NY with only the testers there, no one in line waiting to be tested, basically saying its no where near as bad as the media is saying. THEN a dem. sided source posts a video of bodies being loaded into a trailer of a semi out back of a hospital basically saying 'oh yes it is'!!! Comment only, no question.
 
Mike_RN

Mike_RN

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Aug 13, 2013
2,129
1,872
#14
Yes that is the only reason to self quarantine honestly. Go slow down the rate of infection. It’ll make its way through the herd anyway. Many of us have likely been through it already and recovered (many folks had bad colds for many weeks this winter here on East Coast.
 
Mike_RN

Mike_RN

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Aug 13, 2013
2,129
1,872
#15
Have you all seen the report where a rep. sided source showed pics of testing site in Brooklyn, NY with only the testers there, no one in line waiting to be tested, basically saying its no where near as bad as the media is saying. THEN a dem. sided source posts a video of bodies being loaded into a trailer of a semi out back of a hospital basically saying 'oh yes it is'!!! Comment only, no question.
Please don’t politicize this thread.
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
832
190
#16
Mike, I'm not 100% understanding the 3hr window for the virus being airborne...If someone that is contagious coughs or sneezes, thereby ejecting water molecules into the air which are laden with the virus, how can those water molecules stay airborne for 3hrs?...Wouldn't that be a little unreasonable for them to stay in the air mass that long?...Seems like they would dssiipate a lot sooner than 3hrs...What am I missing?...
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,494
2,665
#17
Yes that is the only reason to self quarantine honestly. Go slow down the rate of infection. It’ll make its way through the herd anyway. Many of us have likely been through it already and recovered (many folks had bad colds for many weeks this winter here on East Coast.
I forgot where I read but the piece stated that many who were sick in Jan/ Feb probably had been exposed and have since recovered. I'll be honest, I was sick for a week or a bit longer and go to a school where a large percentage of the pop are international. I'm perfectly fine now but it does make one wonder.
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
832
190
#18
Mike, I'm not 100% understanding the 3hr window for the virus being airborne...If someone that is contagious coughs or sneezes, thereby ejecting water molecules into the air which are laden with the virus, how can those water molecules stay airborne for 3hrs?...Wouldn't that be a little unreasonable for them to stay in the air mass that long?...Seems like they would dssiipate a lot sooner than 3hrs...What am I missing?...

Another thought popped related to this question, bro...If a contaminated person can aerosolize the virus when coughing or sneezing, how would that not kill the virus?...Doesn't it break the virus into particles when they cough or sneeze (aerosolize)?...It almost seems like it would have to be engineered to survive that process...I don't get how u can break a virus into particles, and yet it still is able to function as a whole (infect)...
 
Last edited:
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
832
190
#20
Another thought popped related to this question, bro...If a contaminated person can aerosolize the virus when coughing or sneezing, how would that not kill the virus?...Doesn't it break the virus into particles when they cough or sneeze (aerosolize)?...It almost seems like it would have to be engineered to survive that process...I don't get how u can break a virus into particles, and yet it still is able to function as a whole (infect)...The flu does the same, right?

It almost sounds like this thing was designed to infect?...I hope not!....
 
Last edited:
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
832
190
#21
Another thought popped related to this question, bro...If a contaminated person can aerosolize the virus when coughing or sneezing, how would that not kill the virus?...Doesn't it break the virus into particles when they cough or sneeze (aerosolize)?...It almost seems like it would have to be engineered to survive that process...I don't get how u can break a virus into particles, and yet it still is able to function as a whole (infect)...
My thinking on this is based on when I made gun powder...For instance, I could mix a good oxidizer with a decent fuel and get ignition pretty easy...However, if I didn't use an oxidizer (bind it to the fuel) then when I would try to ignite the fuel by itself, no go...It seems like this would be same principle with a virus...If u break it down into separate particles, how can it still function?...
 
woodswise

woodswise

TID Board Of Directors
Apr 29, 2012
4,241
1,190
#22
My thinking on this is based on when I made gun powder...For instance, I could mix a good oxidizer with a decent fuel and get ignition pretty easy...However, if I didn't use an oxidizer (bind it to the fuel) then when I would try to ignite the fuel by itself, no go...It seems like this would be same principle with a virus...If u break it down into separate particles, how can it still function?...
Viruses are some of the smallest "living" things out there. They have evolved to transmit in different ways, one of which is when one person sneezes or coughs, thus expelling small droplets of moisture that carry the virus. Studies of the coronavirus 19 show that when an infected person sneezes or coughs, it can remain in the air in tiny drops of moisture that float around for hours. This is called "aerosolization" similar to spraying something from an aerosol can. The tiny viruses are so small that thousands of them can be trapped in a tiny droplet of water.

If you try to compare this to your anectdotal knowledge of gun powder, the comparison won't work because, they are two different things -- one is a living agent, and the other is a chemical substance -- and the results of aerosolization are completely different: gun powder will explode only in significant quantities and doesn't infect you, whereas a virus can infect you with a single unit so the quantity does not matter, only contact with a single microscopic virus does.
 
woodswise

woodswise

TID Board Of Directors
Apr 29, 2012
4,241
1,190
#23
Another thought popped related to this question, bro...If a contaminated person can aerosolize the virus when coughing or sneezing, how would that not kill the virus?...Doesn't it break the virus into particles when they cough or sneeze (aerosolize)?...It almost seems like it would have to be engineered to survive that process...I don't get how u can break a virus into particles, and yet it still is able to function as a whole (infect)...
Viruses are so small they are not affected mechanically by our bodies. Thousands of them can fit into a tiny droplet of moisture (saliva or mucous) and they are stable enough that they are not injured by being expelled by a sneezing or coughing human. I expect you could put them through a food mill or blender and that wouldn't hurt them much, if at all. What does kill them, after a significant period of time measured in hours or days is exposure to sunshine, drying out, oxygen, certain chemicals (i.e. certain disinfectants),heat,etc. I have read that Coronavirus is not killed by freezing temperatures around 32 degrees F. Most living things are killed when the temperatures fall further, and I expect at some point viruses will be killed by freezing, too. Soap and water doesn't kill them per-se, but does remove them from your skin and washes them down the drain.
 
rawdeal

rawdeal

TID Board Of Directors
Nov 29, 2013
2,397
1,273
#24
Look up in the sky some days, or out of an airplane window, and you'll see clouds. Those are water droplets floating in air.
Go outside on one of those days the fog is so thick it affects your driving; those are water droplets floating in air.

Bacteria and virus are small enough to hitch a ride inside water droplets that are expelled by humans in any number of ways, and those droplets don't plummet to the ground immediately. No cause for concern, however, as long as you don't get near an infected human, even one who shows no symptoms.
 
Top