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Open Gyms Petition

HDH

HDH

TID Board Of Directors
Sep 30, 2011
2,273
1,259
I just saw that Georgia can open gyms on Fri.

I hope all the old people votes won't affect reopening here in Fl.
 
JackD

JackD

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 16, 2010
5,593
896
I can’t wait for the gyms to open up, but seriously though, people are disgusting and what gym is constantly wiping everything down, and what person is cleaning up after themselves?

I want them to open, but crap, I think working out at home is a better bet even though I am the first to say I hate my life and routine when there is no gym.
 
enjoy_tren

enjoy_tren

VIP Member
Jan 7, 2014
438
295
I wonder if these people taking temperatures know what heat and exercise does to the core temperature. I did a 15 minute rubber band workout last night, I checked my temperature with one of the infrared temp things and it was elevated to 101.7. It stayed elevated for about 30 minutes afterwards. Much higher intensity workouts can increase the core temperature to as much as 104 degrees. Walking outside on a hot day can do the same. Just another senseless invasion of our privacy.

not sure how they are differentiating temp vs. fever. Probably temperature + other readings to separate temp vs. fever temp. Dragonfly the company makes this has said they differentiate the two
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
2,010
569
Not sure I am understanding how this works. I read the whole article and even the news release and all the described was, "The pandemic drone will be equipped with a specialized sensor and computer vision systems that can display fever/temperature, heart and respiratory rates, as well as detect people sneezing and coughing in crowds." Fever is simply an abnormal increase in body temperature. Most of the new monitors are infrared which measure temperature. i would suspect they use infrared technology in cameras but they don't say.


BackAtIt, I brought up body temperature because I was involved in a scientific debate recently over whether or not exercise induced rises in core temperature might help to fight off covid 19. We do know it is capable of fighting off other viruses especially respiratory viruses which is the reason most low intensity and medium intensity athletes have very few incidents of respiratory infections. So I wanted to see where my core temp went after exercise.

Some are saying that this can't fight high temp....Have u read those reports, Tex?...If I remember correctly (which usally I don't),a bro from here mentioned in the corona thread that he didn't think high temp would fight this...I think he was thinking it came from bats and bats sport high temps twice a day...


Here is an article too, claiming that this virus has been altered to infect humans more efficiently than normal...



https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...coronavirus.html?ito=native_share_article-top



.
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
2,010
569
not sure how they are differentiating temp vs. fever. Probably temperature + other readings to separate temp vs. fever temp. Dragonfly the company makes this has said they differentiate the two


I would suspect that the cp has a line of code that has "normal" temp ranges for humans and a line of code that checks for "abnormal" temps...It would be fairly easy to code this into a program....probably show up in the form of " if then else" or similar....

.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
914
1,343
Some are saying that this can't fight high temp....Have u read those reports, Tex?...If I remember correctly (which usally I don't),a bro from here mentioned in the corona thread that he didn't think high temp would fight this...I think he was thinking it came from bats and bats sport high temps twice a day...
Here is an article too, claiming that this virus has been altered to infect humans more efficiently than normal...

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...coronavirus.html?ito=native_share_article-top
Seems this most likely didn't come from bats but someone who could have been working with the virus at a lab. Anyway, there was a study just released about That found that humidity, heat and especially Sunlight (UV) works to shorten the half life of this virus. Also remember the bodies natural response to infection is to raise the core temperature. This elevated body temperature sets in motion a series of mechanisms that regulate our immune system. So it is apparent that the increases we get from exercise aid in preventing viral and bacterial infections.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321889#The-protein-that-alters-temperature-reactivity

COVID19.JPG


Here is a good study on exercise and URI's. As mentioned above, the head the body produces from exercise sets off the following mechanisms that help prevent bacteria and virus. Glucocorticoids (cortisol) increases while catecholamines (adrenaline etc) decrease lowering the amount of inflammation in the body, thus C-Reactive protein levels decrease. Is intensity increases the reverse takes place (Fig 1)

CONCLUSIONS
This article has provided evidence to support the hypothesis that moderate intensity exercise reduces inflammation and improves the immune response to respiratory viral infections. We hypothesize that acute and chronic moderate exercise induces a level of stress hormones that down-regulates excessive inflammation within the respiratory tract and aids in activating innate anti-viral immunity shifting the immune response towards a Th2 profile (Fig. 4),thereby balancing the Th1/Th2 responses to prevent an excessive Th1 immune reaction to these pathogens. Prolonged, intense exercise may do this as well but may shift the balance too much towards Th2 and away from Th1 actually allowing the virus to gain a better foothold and cause greater pathology. Further research is necessary to examine cellular and molecular mechanisms through which exercise modulates immune function. Additionally, human studies should attempt to elucidate the most common respiratory pathogens responsible for infections associated with high intensity exercise training and athletic competitions, and the methods they employ to evade immune response, as well as attempt to translate mechanistic studies to a human experimental model. Based upon the available evidence, moderate intensity exercise training should be used as an adjunct to other preventative measures against respiratory tract viral infection.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2803113/

Checks and balances
Th1
- cytokines tend to produce the pro-inflammatory responses responsible for killing intracellular parasites and for perpetuating autoimmune responses. Th1 response is necessary in the early stages of viral infection, as it promotes rapid clearance of the virus.

Th2- include interleukins 4, 5, and 13, which are associated with the promotion of IgE and eosinophilic responses in atopy, and also interleukin-10, which has more of an anti-inflammatory response. In excess, Th2 responses will counteract the Th1 mediated microbicidal action. The optimal scenario would therefore seem to be that humans should produce a well balanced Th1 and Th2 response, suited to the immune challenge.

The big thing with covid 19 is there is a huge flood of Th1 levels (cytokine storm) in the later cycles which can have some harmful effects on the body leading to pulmonary edema and lung failure, and have liver, heart, and kidney damages . Moderate exercise seems to enable the body to keep a balance in Th1 and Th2 levels which fight off inflammation and avoid this harm high Th1 levels seem to cause. People that do not exercise or have preexisting disease like obesity/ diabetes have difficulty fighting off this flood of cytokines.
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
2,010
569
Seems this most likely didn't come from bats but someone who could have been working with the virus at a lab. Anyway, there was a study just released about That found that humidity, heat and especially Sunlight (UV) works to shorten the half life of this virus. Also remember the bodies natural response to infection is to raise the core temperature. This elevated body temperature sets in motion a series of mechanisms that regulate our immune system. So it is apparent that the increases we get from exercise aid in preventing viral and bacterial infections.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321889#The-protein-that-alters-temperature-reactivity

View attachment 10628

Here is a good study on exercise and URI's. As mentioned above, the head the body produces from exercise sets off the following mechanisms that help prevent bacteria and virus. Glucocorticoids (cortisol) increases while catecholamines (adrenaline etc) decrease lowering the amount of inflammation in the body, thus C-Reactive protein levels decrease. Is intensity increases the reverse takes place (Fig 1)

CONCLUSIONS
This article has provided evidence to support the hypothesis that moderate intensity exercise reduces inflammation and improves the immune response to respiratory viral infections. We hypothesize that acute and chronic moderate exercise induces a level of stress hormones that down-regulates excessive inflammation within the respiratory tract and aids in activating innate anti-viral immunity shifting the immune response towards a Th2 profile (Fig. 4),thereby balancing the Th1/Th2 responses to prevent an excessive Th1 immune reaction to these pathogens. Prolonged, intense exercise may do this as well but may shift the balance too much towards Th2 and away from Th1 actually allowing the virus to gain a better foothold and cause greater pathology. Further research is necessary to examine cellular and molecular mechanisms through which exercise modulates immune function. Additionally, human studies should attempt to elucidate the most common respiratory pathogens responsible for infections associated with high intensity exercise training and athletic competitions, and the methods they employ to evade immune response, as well as attempt to translate mechanistic studies to a human experimental model. Based upon the available evidence, moderate intensity exercise training should be used as an adjunct to other preventative measures against respiratory tract viral infection.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2803113/

Checks and balances
Th1
- cytokines tend to produce the pro-inflammatory responses responsible for killing intracellular parasites and for perpetuating autoimmune responses. Th1 response is necessary in the early stages of viral infection, as it promotes rapid clearance of the virus.

Th2- include interleukins 4, 5, and 13, which are associated with the promotion of IgE and eosinophilic responses in atopy, and also interleukin-10, which has more of an anti-inflammatory response. In excess, Th2 responses will counteract the Th1 mediated microbicidal action. The optimal scenario would therefore seem to be that humans should produce a well balanced Th1 and Th2 response, suited to the immune challenge.

The big thing with covid 19 is there is a huge flood of Th1 levels (cytokine storm) in the later cycles which can have some harmful effects on the body leading to pulmonary edema and lung failure, and have liver, heart, and kidney damages . Moderate exercise seems to enable the body to keep a balance in Th1 and Th2 levels which fight off inflammation and avoid this harm high Th1 levels seem to cause. People that do not exercise or have preexisting disease like obesity/ diabetes have difficulty fighting off this flood of cytokines.

It gets really confusing when studying this stuff...I was always under the impression that they keep hospitals cold in order to help prevent bacterial growth/germs ect from spreading...Every operation I've had (that be many) it was always super cold in the or...I was always given that the cold help prevent bacterial growth/virual spreads....I had a biologist tell me that really what kills viruses/bacteria is the rapid change in temp, not the temp itself...Can't remember what the window for range of temp is, but it doesn't take much of a differential in temp to kill them...Is just the rapid change from one temp to another...

However, I tend to concur with u too...I know I haven't had the flu yet, or didn't know it if I did....I will occasionally get a cold at the change of season, but gone in a couple of days with vit c upload....Of course this is when I'm working out regularly...There have been times tho when I stalled on workouts and I would get 2-3 colds that would last 2-3 weeks in that year....Anyway, some say this virus can handle the heat, others are saying no....Thanks for the article, bro!....Good read!

.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
914
1,343
It gets really confusing when studying this stuff...I was always under the impression that they keep hospitals cold in order to help prevent bacterial growth/germs ect from spreading...Every operation I've had (that be many) it was always super cold in the or...I was always given that the cold help prevent bacterial growth/virual spreads....I had a biologist tell me that really what kills viruses/bacteria is the rapid change in temp, not the temp itself...Can't remember what the window for range of temp is, but it doesn't take much of a differential in temp to kill them...Is just the rapid change from one temp to another...

However, I tend to concur with u too...I know I haven't had the flu yet, or didn't know it if I did....I will occasionally get a cold at the change of season, but gone in a couple of days with vit c upload....Of course this is when I'm working out regularly...There have been times tho when I stalled on workouts and I would get 2-3 colds that would last 2-3 weeks in that year....Anyway, some say this virus can handle the heat, others are saying no....Thanks for the article, bro!....Good read!

.

The outer membrane of a virus is made chiefly of molecules known as lipids. This lipid coat protects the virus while it is being transmitted. Without the lipid coat, the virus quickly dries out and dies. Once in the body, the higher temperatures melt the protective lipid coating and it can then replicate. Researchers discovered that at temperatures slightly above freezing and below, the virus's lipid covering solidified into a gel. So their half life in the air or on solid substance is much higher because of the solidified gel coating. At about 70 degrees Fahrenheit, much of the lipid was still in gel form. At warmer temperatures, however, the gel melts to a liquid phase. So as temperatures rise, the half life of the virus shortens. Humidity also has the same effect. As humidity rises above 20% the half life of the virus shortens. Therefore, in a place with high temperatures, high humidity and lots of sunlight, the chance of transmission is very low unless someone coughs or sneezes directly on you and the virus gets in your body. Sun light seems to have even a more dramatic effect of shortening the half life. So viruses are better transmitted indoors in air-conditioned buildings with lower humidity than outside in particular lots of sun, higher temperatures and higher humidity. The opposite is pretty much true for bacteria.

New York City is a very good example of this. Cooler temperatures, less sun light and many spend much of their day in a building. Not to mention many have central HVAC systems so ventilation is poor and air is shared. While Southern States had issues, they were not near as bad so the chance of transmission we greatly diminished by effects of increased sun, humidity and temperatures. Even more dramatic is Brazil, where there is lots of sun, temperatures that range from 75 at night to 85-90 in the day and humidity is often up in the 80%+ range. The half life of a virus is very short so the chance of transmission is much less. Many people in Brazil also don't have air-conditioning. They had cases, few deaths but did not ever shut down their economy. They also take lots of anti-malarial drugs there. So keeping a hospital cold has little effect on a virus which could be the reason so many viruses are transmitted in a hospital if they are not kept perfectly sanitized.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
914
1,343
BackAtit, this is a very good study but they are talking about instantly killing a virus though, not slowing the half life. Killing it of course is ideal. But you can kill it petty quickly with a light solution of bleach. The however, DHS study showed the following:

temps of 70-75 degrees, with 20% humidity and no sun - 18 hour half life.
temps of 70-75 degrees, with 80% humidity and no sun - 6 hour half life.
temps of 95 degrees, with 80% humidity and no sun - 1 hour half life.
temps of 70-75 degrees, with 80% humidity and summer sun - 2 minute half life.

^^^^^This 1st figure is very typical of an office building, high rise apartment or school. Raising the humidity levels lowers the chance of transmission of 60%. Increasing the temperature with high humidity and no sun shortens the half life greatly. Even with lower temperatures, high humidity combines with sun there is a 2 minute half life. Not killed but your chance of transmission in sun are much lower than in a building with comfortable temperatures and low humidity. Transmission would also be less in the day with sun, than at night with no sun. Again, the difference in the intensity of the sun in say NYC as compared to Miami, Florida would make a huge difference.

So being in say an airplane with a controlled HVAC system at around 70-75 combined with a low humidity around 20%, the half life of this virus is around 18 hours. It will be easy to inhale this or get it on your hands as the virus thrives in this environment. Can't very well raise the temperature, increase humidity either as people would not be comfortable. However, sunlight seems to be the biggest key.....UVA works well to sterilize.

Do you know that hospitals typically use UVA light sterilizing units in their HVAC systems, along with pressurized air control and Merv 17 air filters? This helps control the spread of virus etc from room to room while killing the virus in the HVAC system before it is recirculated into the rooms. The cool dry atmosphere controls the bacteria. We had a coil UVA system put in our AC/Heat unit two summers ago for very little.

To instant kill it you need very hot temperatures. We don't typically need to go that far as this same study also showed a 26% solution of bleach (5sec) or a 70% solution of isopropyl alcohol (30sec).
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
2,010
569
BackAtit, this is a very good study but they are talking about instantly killing a virus though, not slowing the half life. Killing it of course is ideal. But you can kill it petty quickly with a light solution of bleach. The however, DHS study showed the following:

temps of 70-75 degrees, with 20% humidity and no sun - 18 hour half life.
temps of 70-75 degrees, with 80% humidity and no sun - 6 hour half life.
temps of 95 degrees, with 80% humidity and no sun - 1 hour half life.
temps of 70-75 degrees, with 80% humidity and summer sun - 2 minute half life.

I see what u are saying...However, aren't they claiming in this study that the CV is different?...That it can resist temps?....That's what I'm getting from it...I understand that the "common" virus falls into what u are telling me, however, the CV is able to combat this issue...Isn't that what this report is saying?....



"Professor Remi Charrel and colleagues at the Aix-Marseille University in southern France heated the virus that causes Covid-19 to 60 degrees Celsius (140 Fahrenheit) for an hour and found that some strains were still able to replicate."



Do you know that hospitals typically use UVA light sterilizing units in their HVAC systems, along with pressurized air control and Merv 17 air filters? .

I did read about it not to long ago....



When u run the numbers on warmer states the data does show that u are correct....So why is that study saying that?....Are they lying about it resisting temps up to 140 degrees?...

NY = 14,642 per million
NJ = 11,881 per million
MA = 7,462 per million


Florida = 1,497 per million
Cali = 1,057 per million
Arizona = 870 per million

.
 
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