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Omega 3 Eggs

Lizard King

Lizard King

Administrator
Staff Member
Sep 9, 2010
11,384
3,137
#1
Ok, why are these so special as opposed to regular eggs? The yolks are darker and they are tastier but are they worth more then double the price of regular eggs?
And yes, I know they have more Omega 3 in them, lol
 
Q

Qwerty1424

MuscleHead
Mar 2, 2011
429
13
#2
sounds like a rip off.... if you have a well planned diet u will get ur omegas from ur fish and supplements i agree with u LK why spends so much on fucking omega eggs.... i think the question im wondering now is... how do they produce these?
 
W

Wolf

MuscleHead
Dec 25, 2010
274
45
#5
Its a difference in the feed. Omega 3 fatty acid high eggs are achieved by substituting out corn and soy and the chickens are fed a more natural diet of insects and greens. Sometimes they are fed fish oils to achieve this as well. It's pretty much the same with any animal, feed it corn and soy, low omega 3, feed it grass and greens, high omega 3s. Depending on your diet it is worth it. Here a carton of 12 omega 3 eggs is 3 bucks and on sale 2 dollars to 2.50.

Some people don't like fish or the fishy taste that some fish oil capsules have. Omega 3 eggs might be more economical than buying free caught fish, since farmed raised fish usually are low in omega 3 acids and high in undesirable fats but is so much cheaper. Omega 3 eggs can also be used in baking applications. For people who are on low carb diets and are particular about the types of fat they get in, it's especially helpful. They also tend to be slightly lower in total fat while having something upwards to 5, 6 or 7 times the amount of omega 3s that corn fed chickens produce in their eggs.
 
Mindlesswork

Mindlesswork

Crusty Poo Butt
Sep 21, 2010
1,395
33
#6
Plain eggs are the better deal...why waste money on these omega eggs? Fish oil capsules I have no problem with
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,252
2,531
#7
Remember if you're Omega 3 to Omega 6 ratio is off the body sends a signal to make it more difficult to burn fat. We get to much of one and not enough of the other. I don't recall which one it is off the top of my head but an easy way to ensure you enough omega 3, 6, and 9 just make one meal a day fish, use olive oil, and consume almonds.
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,034
1,187
#8
Our paleolithic ancestors, and current hunter-gatherer tribes, have(had) a balance between omega 6s and omega 3s of 1:1. Our modern diets have a ratio of omega 6s to omega 3s of approximately 15:1, and it keeps our bodies in a constant state of inflammation (omega 6s are pro-inflammatory, omega 3s are anti-inflammatory). Because our immune system works overtime to fight the inflammation from our poor diets, it can use less resources for important things. Point is, we need to consume less omega 6s and more omega 3s. I've learned a great deal about the inflammation caused by our modern diets from reading about the paleo diet, which is similar to the caveman diet.
 
W

Wolf

MuscleHead
Dec 25, 2010
274
45
#9
Bunch of studies you can read if you want more info. On an anecdotal note a lot of the people who I've dealt with that have ran any sort of low carb diet usually have reported to me that they notice accelerated or more effective levels of fat burning with higher levels of omega 3 intake.

The importance of the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 ess... [Biomed Pharmacother. 2002] - PubMed result

Several sources of information suggest that human beings evolved on a diet with a ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 essential fatty acids (EFA) of approximately 1 whereas in Western diets the ratio is 15/1-16.7/1. Western diets are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids, and have excessive amounts of omega-6 fatty acids compared with the diet on which human beings evolved and their genetic patterns were established. Excessive amounts of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a very high omega-6/omega-3 ratio, as is found in today's Western diets, promote the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, whereas increased levels of omega-3 PUFA (a low omega-6/omega-3 ratio) exert suppressive effects. In the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, a ratio of 4/1 was associated with a 70% decrease in total mortality. A ratio of 2.5/1 reduced rectal cell proliferation in patients with colorectal cancer, whereas a ratio of 4/1 with the same amount of omega-3 PUFA had no effect. The lower omega-6/omega-3 ratio in women with breast cancer was associated with decreased risk. A ratio of 2-3/1 suppressed inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and a ratio of 5/1 had a beneficial effect on patients with asthma, whereas a ratio of 10/1 had adverse consequences. These studies indicate that the optimal ratio may vary with the disease under consideration. This is consistent with the fact that chronic diseases are multigenic and multifactorial. Therefore, it is quite possible that the therapeutic dose of omega-3 fatty acids will depend on the degree of severity of disease resulting from the genetic predisposition. A lower ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is more desirable in reducing the risk of many of the chronic diseases of high prevalence in Western societies, as well as in the developing countries, that are being exported to the rest of the world.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,252
2,531
#10
Our paleolithic ancestors, and current hunter-gatherer tribes, have(had) a balance between omega 6s and omega 3s of 1:1. Our modern diets have a ratio of omega 6s to omega 3s of approximately 15:1, and it keeps our bodies in a constant state of inflammation (omega 6s are pro-inflammatory, omega 3s are anti-inflammatory). Because our immune system works overtime to fight the inflammation from our poor diets, it can use less resources for important things. Point is, we need to consume less omega 6s and more omega 3s. I've learned a great deal about the inflammation caused by our modern diets from reading about the paleo diet, which is similar to the caveman diet.
Do you follow the paleo diet yourself?
 
Lizard King

Lizard King

Administrator
Staff Member
Sep 9, 2010
11,384
3,137
#11
I eat a decent amount of fish, Salmon at least once a week, tuna 2 - 3 times if not more plus my almonds. The Omega 3 eggs do taste much better, much darker yolks, hard to justify the price though with the amount of eggs I eat.
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,034
1,187
#12
Do you follow the paleo diet yourself?
I'd like to follow it more strictly than I do, and when on the CKD it's actually very easy to do that, but on a carb-cycling diet or full on bulker, it's tough to get enough carbs without eating some wheat pastas or breads. Robb Wolf, a leading Paleo diet expert, has a modified paleo diet for athletes that includes starchy carbs before and after workouts. I haven't given it a try yet, but my diet is pretty paleo despite the occasional cheat meal.
 
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