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night time protein

goldy

goldy

Chutzpah VIP
Jan 17, 2011
1,263
153
#1
I need a suggestion on a good night time slow release protein. i am going to start drinking a 50G shake before bed. no carbs preferably. Last one i tried was syntrax matrix which was pretty good aside from the soy protein it had.
 
Getraw

Getraw

VIP Member
Feb 6, 2011
298
27
#2
I use Zero Card Isopure before bed. It doesnt lead to any fat storage. Its made by Nature's Best


or if your Bulking Optimum Nutrition 100% Casein Protein 4 lbs Chocolate Supreme

GR
 
Last edited:
goldy

goldy

Chutzpah VIP
Jan 17, 2011
1,263
153
#3
i have a 7.5 pound tub of cookies and cream and a 7.5 pound of chocolate isopure already, i just thought a slow release would be better before bed?

I only drink isolate when i drink whey, concentrate is JUNK.
 
Getraw

Getraw

VIP Member
Feb 6, 2011
298
27
#4
A slow release is better when your bulking, due to the fact you dont wake up and fill calories. But if your cutting you dont want the extra carbs to sit on you all night. So cutting would be Isopure, bulking Casein.



GR
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,083
1,256
#5
Where are the carbs in a casein protein shake GR? There's actually a study where the subjects dieted and used either nothing, whey, or casein protein, and the subjects who used casein lost the most weight. Give me a minute and I'll find it.

The way I understand the science, is that if you take a fast acting protein right before bed, you can will use a certain portion within the first 2 hours, but after that, since you are asleep, your liver just turns it into glucose. Whereas casein is like a slow drip all night so you never get so much that the liver needs to use the excess for gluconeogenesis.

Now where is that damn study........
 
Getraw

Getraw

VIP Member
Feb 6, 2011
298
27
#6
I would like to see that study bro, I never said that I wasnt wrong at times..lol. This is just what I do for my personal self, but im always willing to change it up. Thats part of being on these board is to learn something new. I would like to see that study though bro if you can find it,

Much respect,
GR
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,083
1,256
#7
Found it. I believe in casein proteins for sustained release Goldy, but I think at your weight that 50g may be too much. I'm 230 and found my sweet spot right at 35g. I was getting 50g but felt like it was putting a little fat on me.


Going on a Diet? The Protein Supplement You Choose Might Make a Big Difference

By Bryan Haycock, MS

Everybody knows that when you go on a diet, consuming a bit more protein will help you hold on to hard earned muscle. The reason for this is that, skeletal muscle is your body’s main "store" of protein and when food is scarce the body uses this protein for glucose (sugar) production. You can blame your brain for this. You see, your brain and central nervous system rely almost entirely on glucose for energy, fat is out of the question. In order not to slip into a hypoglycemic stupor, or even worse, a coma, the body has set up a system that goes around breaking down muscle tissue in order to feed its glucose manufacturing centers in the liver. A necessary evil I guess.

So does the type of protein you eat make any difference in how much muscle you save during a diet? Apparently it does. In a recent study in the Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, they compared the effects of a moderate diet, high-protein diet and resistance training, using two different protein supplements, or the diet alone on body compositional changes in overweight police officers (1). It was a randomized 12-week study. One group was placed on a hypocaloric diet alone (80% of maintenance). A second group was placed on the hypocaloric diet plus resistance exercise plus a high-protein intake (1.5 g/kg/day) using a casein protein hydrolysate. In the third group treatment was identical to the second, except for the use of a whey protein hydrolysate. They found no difference in total weight loss between groups (about 5.5 lbs. for all groups). Mean percent body fat with diet alone decreased from 27 to about 25% at 12 weeks. With diet, exercise and casein the decrease was from 26 to about 18%, and with diet, exercise and whey protein the decrease was from 27 to about 23%. So the mean fat loss was 2.5 (no protein supplement),7.0 (casein supplement) and 4.2 kg (whey supplement) in the three groups. Lean mass gains in the three groups did not change for diet alone, versus gains of about 4 kg in the casein group and 2 kg in the whey group. Mean increase in strength for chest, shoulder and legs was 59% for casein versus 29% for whey, a statistically significant difference.

I will admit I was really surprised to see such dramatic differences between the casein and whey groups. It should be noted that the dietary habits of these police officers were pretty bad before this study even began. Many weren’t eating enough protein, and most were bingeing on carbs late in the day having not had the time to eat earlier in the day. Just by improving their baseline diet probably had an impact on their muscle mass gains. Still, this brings up the "Fast vs. Slow Protein" study that has gotten so much attention recently (2).

Obviously, whey and casein, although both milk proteins, behave differently and have different physiological effects. There is a lot to discuss about these recent findings. Further research is needed to explain just what peptides in casein are responsible for the anticatabolic effect, or, as Boirie et al demonstrated, whether it is simply a matter of absorption rates. Not only that, but what effect do other nutrients like carbs and fat have on these two protein supplements during a diet? There’s more to come I’m sure…

References:

1. Robert H. Demling, Leslie DeSanti. Effect of a Hypocaloric Diet, Increased Protein Intake and Resistance Training on Lean Mass Gains and Fat Mass Loss in Overweight Police Officers. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism 44:1:2000, 21-29.
2. Boirie Y, Dangin M, Gachon P, Vasson MP, Maubois JL, Beaufrere B Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1997 Dec 23;94(26):14930-5
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,083
1,256
#8
I would like to see that study bro, I never said that I wasnt wrong at times..lol. This is just what I do for my personal self, but im always willing to change it up. Thats part of being on these board is to learn something new. I would like to see that study though bro if you can find it,

Much respect,
GR

I read back over my response to you and it may have come off wrong, but I assure you there was no disrespect intended. I agree 100% with you about always learning from these boards. Sorry if I came off wrong, it's hard to convey tone and inflection in a post.
 
Getraw

Getraw

VIP Member
Feb 6, 2011
298
27
#9
I read back over my response to you and it may have come off wrong, but I assure you there was no disrespect intended. I agree 100% with you about always learning from these boards. Sorry if I came off wrong, it's hard to convey tone and inflection in a post.

None take bro, Thats what i love about our community we can always learn new tricks of the trade. I guess i gained weight off of Casein from the high intake is what it looks like. It seem I will benefit for lowing the intake and still using it. Cause you are right that Isopure does not release all night. Its only about a 2 hour window, very interseting read bro. Thanks for sharing


GR
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,083
1,256
#10
None take bro, Thats what i love about our community we can always learn new tricks of the trade. I guess i gained weight off of Casein from the high intake is what it looks like. It seem I will benefit for lowing the intake and still using it. Cause you are right that Isopure does not release all night. Its only about a 2 hour window, very interseting read bro. Thanks for sharing


GR

No problem GR, its nice to be able to contribute rather than always leeching from the vets.
 
Rein

Rein

MuscleHead
Sep 10, 2010
1,241
128
#11
You could always eat some cottage cheese or fat free yogurt. Personally, i like to eat 400grams of 2% fat yogurt. This gives me 32 grams of slow digesting protein and very few carbs and fats.

I feel that going with whole food is the best option. You can never be too sure about what protein powders really contain and how much protein do you get out of each serving.
 
SAD

SAD

TID Board Of Directors
Feb 3, 2011
3,083
1,256
#12
You could always eat some cottage cheese or fat free yogurt. Personally, i like to eat 400grams of 2% fat yogurt. This gives me 32 grams of slow digesting protein and very few carbs and fats.

I feel that going with whole food is the best option. You can never be too sure about what protein powders really contain and how much protein do you get out of each serving.

400 grams of yogurt? You mean calories? I'm also a huge proponent of whole food, but I haven't found a whole food yet that can mimic a casein shake. I've heard about guys who swear by cottage cheese, but I hate cottage cheese, so I haven't even tried it. lol. Even fat free cottage cheese has 3 grams of sugar per 13 grams of protein, so to get my 35 grams of protein I'd be getting almost 10grams of sugar right before bed. Guess I'll just stick with the casein.
 
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