Latest posts

Forum Statistics

Threads
26,473
Posts
521,036
Members
28,191
Latest Member
Iam1golfer
What's New?

New news to me...

rAJJIN

rAJJIN

TID Board Of Directors
Nov 30, 2011
872
579
Is this the same as Ozempic? If so
I know it’s popular here now for weight loss.
Females are paying high $ for it.
 
testboner

testboner

VIP Member
Oct 10, 2010
1,305
1,568
Is this the same as Ozempic? If so
I know it’s popular here now for weight loss.
Females are paying high $ for it.
Yes, Ozempic (and Wegovy) are just a couple brand names of Semaglutide.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 21, 2011
1,504
1,576
I've been following this for a while now, and it's so far been a huge game-changer for a lot of people, outside of a few people who didn't feel like it helped them. I had a thread over at WCBB with a TON of studies on it, but I think that thread was deleted at the last reset when the board went down in the spring:( They are coming out with tons of new studies on this stuff, all promising.


"Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) are potent antidiabetic drugs associated with significant weight loss and minimal risk of hypoglycemia. Semaglutide is a GLP-1 RA with a proven cardiovascular benefit. It is currently also available in oral form, which is especially suitable for the treatment of the initial phase of type 2 diabetes. However, it is also effective at later initiation of therapy, in different diabetic populations. The PIONEER 6 trial demonstrated cardiovascular safety of oral semaglutide, its administration was accompanied by a significant reduction in cardiovascular and overall mortality."
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 21, 2011
1,504
1,576

New appetite-regulating antiobesity treatments such as semaglutide and agents under investigation such as tirzepatide show promise in achieving weight loss of 15% or more.

Energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and lean mass preservation are important determinants of weight loss and weight-loss maintenance beyond appetite regulation.
This review discusses prior failures in clinical development of weight-loss drugs targeting energy expenditure and explores novel strategies for targeting energy expenditure: mitochondrial proton leak, uncoupling, dynamics, and biogenesis; futile calcium and substrate cycling; leptin for weight maintenance; increased sympathetic nervous system activity; and browning of white fat.

Relevant targets for preserving lean mass are also reviewed: growth hormone, activin type II receptor inhibition, and urocortin 2 and 3. We endorse moderate modulation of energy expenditure and preservation of lean mass in combination with efficient appetite reduction as a means of obtaining a significant, safe, and long-lasting weight loss. Furthermore, we suggest that the regulatory guidelines should be revisited to focus more on the quality of weight loss and its maintenance rather than the absolute weight loss.

Commitment to this research focus both from a scientific and from a regulatory point of view could signal the beginning of the next era in obesity therapies.


*************************************************************************************

Despite recommendations by various clinical practice guidelines and benefits, their usage in clinical practice was limited because of being injectable in nature. Oral semaglutide is a novel GLP-1RA with 94% homology to human GLP-1 which is co-formulated with absorption enhancer sodium N-(8-[2-hydroxybenzoyl] amino) caprylate (SNAC), that overcomes the challenges of peptide absorption in the acidic conditions of the stomach.

*************************************************************************************


Abstract
Oral semaglutide (Rybelsus®) is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) with 94% homology to human GLP-1. It is the first GLP-1RA developed for oral administration, and it comprises a co-formulation of the peptide semaglutide with the absorption enhancer sodium N-(8-[2-hydroxybenzoyl] amino) caprylate, which overcomes the challenges of peptide absorption in the acidic conditions of the stomach. Oral semaglutide is indicated for use as an add-on combination therapy (with other glucose-lowering agents, including insulin) or as a monotherapy (in patients who are intolerant to metformin) for type 2 diabetes when diet and exercise do not provide adequate glycemic control. In an extensive phase III clinical program including patients from across the disease spectrum, treatment with oral semaglutide resulted in effective glycemic control, reductions in body weight, and decreases in systolic blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other glucose-lowering therapies. Studies showed that oral semaglutide was well tolerated, with a safety profile consistent with the GLP-1RA drug class. The risk of hypoglycemia was low, and the most common adverse events were gastrointestinal, with nausea and diarrhea generally being the most frequently reported manifestations. Cardiovascular (CV) safety was shown to be noninferior to placebo and observations suggest that the CV profile of oral semaglutide is likely to be similar to that of subcutaneous semaglutide. The evolution of the GLP-1RA class to include an oral agent could facilitate the use of these agents earlier in the diabetes treatment cascade owing to wider acceptance from patients and healthcare professionals.

*************************************************************************************


Results Among 803 study participants who completed the 20-week run-in period (with a mean weight loss of 10.6%) and were randomized (mean age, 46 [SD, 12] years; 634 [79%] women; mean body weight, 107.2 kg [SD, 22.7 kg]), 787 participants (98.0%) completed the trial and 741 (92.3%) completed treatment. With continued semaglutide, mean body weight change from week 20 to week 68 was −7.9% vs +6.9% with the switch to placebo (difference, −14.8 [95% CI, −16.0 to −13.5] percentage points; P < .001). Waist circumference (−9.7 cm [95% CI, −10.9 to −8.5 cm]), systolic blood pressure (−3.9 mm Hg [95% CI, −5.8 to −2.0 mm Hg]), and SF-36 physical functioning score (2.5 [95% CI, 1.6-3.3]) also improved with continued subcutaneous semaglutide vs placebo (all P < .001). Gastrointestinal events were reported in 49.1% of participants who continued subcutaneous semaglutide vs 26.1% with placebo; similar proportions discontinued treatment because of adverse events with continued semaglutide (2.4%) and placebo (2.2%).

Conclusions and Relevance Among adults with overweight or obesity who completed a 20-week run-in period with subcutaneous semaglutide, 2.4 mg once weekly, maintaining treatment with semaglutide compared with switching to placebo resulted in continued weight loss over the following 48 weeks.

************************************************************************************


This review paper aims to explore the impact of the behavioral programs on the effect of semaglutide 2.4 mg on weight loss. The results of the STEP trials supported the efficacy of high-dose, once-weekly 2.4 mg semaglutide on body weight reduction among patients with obesity with/without diabetes mellitus.

In summary, the results of the STEP trials supported the efficacy of high-dose, once-weekly 2.4 mg semaglutide on body weight reduction among individuals with obesity. While semaglutide resulted in more gastrointestinal-related side effects, the medication appeared generally safe and well tolerated.

The drug may be so effective that the role of nutritional therapy may have to be redefined, and a shift away from using nutritional therapy to achieve more weight loss to rather using nutritional therapy to achieve more health gain may be required.

************************************************************************************
 
Druss

Druss

Member
Oct 23, 2022
21
25
Semaglutide is already on the market its called ozempic, on label use is for diabetics, I take it.
 
Warhead14

Warhead14

TID Board Of Directors
Jul 23, 2011
1,175
767
Has anyone used it? Whats the dosing ? I hear there are all kinds of shortage's of it in LA County because the hollywood crowd is all over it.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Sep 21, 2011
1,504
1,576
I was just approved by the FDA for those with obesity down to the age of 12. This is specifically for Wegovy (Semaglutide 2.4mg weekly).

 
bigsquat82

bigsquat82

Member
Dec 30, 2022
64
36
So if it's the peptide in the body that cause you to release insulin. Why not just take insulin??? All it's doing is causing you to not eat as much and release more insulin. So just diet and use a low dose of long acting insulin??
 
hawkeye

hawkeye

VIP Member
Sep 19, 2011
3,027
858
I've been using Ozempic for a month now consistently. I was prescribed it back in September for weight loss. I have a pretty cool doc and mentioned I have tried Phentermine and with my crazy hours, diet has been rough. Doc was receptive to it when I mentioned Ozempic. Unfortunately, I had issues with supply due to it's popularity. So, I actually had to do a reset on taking it. I started at 25 mg and the first month I lost 7-12 lbs. Then plateued. So now, I am at 50 mg. I think finding your correct dosage is key.

But it seems to be effective. If you eat too much, you feel like shit. Nauseous. And you shit like a goose. LOL. But I think it helps definitely with appetite control and I have that issue because I love food. I'm hoping to maybe clean my diet up and really give it a serious go. It also helped that my doc gave a continuous script so hopefully the issue with supply won't be an issue. At one point, I was waiting 3 weeks for it to come in to my pharmacy.
 
W

Wilson6

VIP Member
Dec 17, 2019
430
694
Has anyone used it? Whats the dosing ? I hear there are all kinds of shortage's of it in LA County because the hollywood crowd is all over it.
Compounding pharmacies are supplying wellness clinics and that is pissing off the endos that can't get the name brand product bc of shortages. Tirzepatide is $160 for 5 mg and Semaglutide is $120 for 3 mg from PS. Wegovy on Good Rx 4 mg prefilled pens is about $1400, and Mounjaro 4 pens of 2.5 mg is about $1,000. Rats have been happy with PS product line, but not those particular products yet (not an endorsement, just heard on the street, yes I talk to those furry little guys on the street). My guess is the compounding pharmacies are getting their raw product in similar fashion from a US mfg other than big pharma and make a shit load of money on it, esp when the name brand is unavailable and very expensive. As I commented on one endo's IG post, anytime you have a product that positively influences body composition, you will have a grey and black market. That's just the way it is. The endo's would like to stop the compounders and the RC sites from selling these products, OK so then the sites that sell AAS and GH will sell it made in China or India and the patients that can't afford or obtain the name brand will go that route that is clearly greater risk or maybe they will end up as controlled substances as that has worked well in controlling other drugs of abuse.
 
Who is viewing this thread?

There are currently 0 members watching this topic

Top