Latest posts

Forum Statistics

Threads
23,900
Posts
470,234
Members
27,211
Latest Member
Doctorvalley
What's New?

Log Lifting

hugerobb

hugerobb

VIP Strength Advisor
Sep 15, 2010
2,027
56
#1
Heavy Log Lifting is one of the most popular events in strongman contests. I have witnessed Jesse Marunde lift a 370 pound log overhead with little apparent difficulty.
There is something basic and primitive about lifting a large, heavy object overhead.

Some strongmen excel at overhead events like log lifting because they combine their strength with excellent weightlifting technique. Jesse Marunde is one of those guys. He is a multi-year weightlifting champion for the State of Washington is addition to being a top professional strongman. I have learned from watching him competing in log lifting, but I have not been able to learn the technique well enough for it to help me. My technique relies almost entirely on strength, with only a little help from momentum.


The first log lifting event for maximum weight that I ever did, was at the 2001 Washington’s Strongest Man contest. I tried to power clean the log and then press it overhead, without having ever tried it before. I did okay and lifted 282 pounds, and got third place behind Jesse Marunde and Grant Higa, who are both Professionals now. As I stated before, Jesse used a weightlifting technique, but what I really noticed was that Grant had a solid power technique and lifted 322 pounds. It was his style that I have tried to emulate.


Improve your Log Lifting with Olympic weight lifting.


The first step in strongman training for log lifting is to approach it and stand with a shoulder width stance, right up against the log.
Bend over and take a grip on the handles. Take a big breath and hold it, squat down slightly, and row the log into your stomach. Ideally, you want the log to touch your upper stomach just above your belt.


The next step is to quickly stand up, pulling the log up toward your shoulders, and then pushing your elbows forward, rolling the log up your torso until it reaches your upper chest and rests there. I know that is alot to think about at first, but with a little practice it becomes second nature. After reading this, it also helps to watch some strongman contests on TV or video, and watch the top guys do this. It will make more sense then.


Now it is time for the press. Take another deep breath and hold it. Dip your knees and bump the log up in the air. Push the log up with all your might at the same time until it is locked out overhead. When you get your timing down and can get a really big bump, the upward momentum of the log will allow you to lift a whole lot more weight overhead.


That is the Power technique for Log Lifting. Conducting your weightlifting workouts using that technique, you can work on either maximum weight or a set weight for reps, depending what your events are in your next contest.


For maximum weight, start with 5 sets of 5 reps from the ground to overhead and back to the ground each set. Do that once a week for 2 or 3 weeks. Then do 5 sets of 3 reps for 2 weeks. Finally do 5 sets of 1 repetition with a weight that you could do 2 reps with if you needed to, on your final training day before the contest.


If you are training to do maximum reps with a set weight, load the log to a weight that is about 20 pounds lighter than the one at the contest. Do 8 sets of 8 reps with only 2 minutes between sets each week until it is too easy. Then you can increase the reps per set to 10 or 12 while still doing 8 sets. You will have to be your judge to decide when to increase your reps, and by how much.


By following this plan, you should be able to improve your log lifting considerably and keep improving until you are lifting huge weights!
 
Rottenrogue

Rottenrogue

Strongwoman
Jan 26, 2011
6,550
1,836
#2
I have found 5/3/1 to be exceptional in bringing my log press up. Also to add.There are different types of logs. I would say a 12 inch log is most common for all weight classes .There are also wooden logs that are a bit bigger and 10 and 8 inch logs.The 8 inch used to be popular in the womens classes but anymore we use 12 's also.
 
Like_a_Weed

Like_a_Weed

MuscleHead
Jan 25, 2011
399
7
#4
Great thread, I'm hoping to try out a comp in a couple weeks and have never even tried the lift. I will try it out Wednesday, the comp will be a 250# log for reps if I can make middleweight, if I can't I won't even try the heavyweight since they use a 300# log. Thanks for the technique description, perfect timing. I'll be happy to get the damn thing up there once! Off to YouTube for some video now.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,411
2,626
#5
Another great SM to watch is Misha Koklyaev. I've seen him Power Jerk and Split Jerk in the Press. He is one of the few men to ever Clean & Jerk 250kg. You may see him in the next Olympics for Olympic Weightlifting. He won't be lifting for Russia b/c their coach (the Legend Dave Rigert) won't let Misha train with his coach and Misha won't train without him but Misha is trying to lift for another country which could very well happen.
 
Hanniballickedher

Hanniballickedher

MuscleHead
Dec 12, 2010
1,235
119
#6
I did the log during training for strongman, my best lift is 255# I have a video of a buddy of mine Lonny Fehr breaking the amateur world record I am posting below, He pressed 400#

 
Last edited by a moderator:
Rottenrogue

Rottenrogue

Strongwoman
Jan 26, 2011
6,550
1,836
#8
The log is a whole nother beats of a lift vs bar pressing.good thing you get to at least try it out beforehand. Are you considering continuing forward with strongman?
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,411
2,626
#9
The log is a whole nother beats of a lift vs bar pressing.good thing you get to at least try it out beforehand. Are you considering continuing forward with strongman?
I would imagine the amount of stress placed on the bicep is immense since the log doesn't sit like a bar.
 
Rottenrogue

Rottenrogue

Strongwoman
Jan 26, 2011
6,550
1,836
#10
I'm not a technical type person but I dont think it is stressful on the bi's. It does butt up to your chest and you hands are in a different position.I definetly use much more tricep in the press.I am a bit of a rare case but i log press more than I do axle .My regular bar press is about 40 pounds higher than both.Mind you I am a presser not a jerker lol.
 
Like_a_Weed

Like_a_Weed

MuscleHead
Jan 25, 2011
399
7
#11
Shit I thought the log would be easier, if I can hang clean and push press 225, I figured 250 was doable..? I guess I'll know in a couple days. I watched some vids, it looks easier than clean and press since you have to row it to your gut then you can roll it up to your chest, and then the range of motion on the press is shorter and allows you to put your chest into it more.
 
Hanniballickedher

Hanniballickedher

MuscleHead
Dec 12, 2010
1,235
119
#12
The log is not bad on the Bi's it is very hard on the lower back and shoulders, it is mainly a shoulder press from the chest over the head. There are a few things here about the log.

1. Dont jerk the log to start, it needs to be smooth and set it on your legs before coming to your chest.
2. The Tricky part. You have to lean back and rest it on your chest, the more forward you are the more off balance and you will be pressing outward not upward.
3. Look up when pressing not forward you will want to move forward if you do.
4. Push up and bring your head under the log don't move the log backward over your head it will throw you off balance.
 
Top