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Knee Rehab

biguglynewf

biguglynewf

TID Board Of Directors
Oct 11, 2010
694
143
#13
I may have been misinformed by my surgeon...or maybe just misunderstood him and that this information applies to my tear but he told me that most if not all mcl's will repair themselves. I didn;t understand how that could be...Maybe time for me to do some research.

Oh and yes I have decent benefits through work so any brace that was required was covered as long as I had the script for it. Rules with benefit companies here may be different than in the US though
 
Mindlesswork

Mindlesswork

Crusty Poo Butt
Sep 21, 2010
1,395
33
#14
The only problem is that in order to get to the torn area, and tie it back together, and help it heal properly, the surgeon must CUT through good tissue, which then needs to heal as well. You can strengthen it and keep it strong til you mess it up again. Its not exact until there's a major or complete tear.
Ahh i see...so only if it is totally detached then can fix it with surgery...but if there's any instability that does interfere with activity will then surgery be done?

So then the brace would be useful as an alternate, right?
 
jdjack

jdjack

MuscleHead
Sep 22, 2010
568
32
#15
IF... her ins pays for it. Some are just VERY stupid, and give some literal dumbass nurse the responsibility of judging whether its valid or not. The physician can write a letter of medical necessity, and usually push for it. But it all depends on the policy that the person and carrier have agreed upon.
 
biguglynewf

biguglynewf

TID Board Of Directors
Oct 11, 2010
694
143
#16
IF... her ins pays for it. Some are just VERY stupid, and give some literal dumbass nurse the responsibility of judging whether its valid or not. The physician can write a letter of medical necessity, and usually push for it. But it all depends on the policy that the person and carrier have agreed upon.
I am very fortunate to not have had to deal with that garbage JD....My ordeal has been difficult enough! But yes I can see that happening...I mean it is an insurance company for all intents and purposes. This does not surprise me really.

And to your question MW - MCL tears rarely, if ever, require surgical intervention. Even a grade III tear.
 
Mindlesswork

Mindlesswork

Crusty Poo Butt
Sep 21, 2010
1,395
33
#17
I am very fortunate to not have had to deal with that garbage JD....My ordeal has been difficult enough! But yes I can see that happening...I mean it is an insurance company for all intents and purposes. This does not surprise me really.

And to your question MW - MCL tears rarely, if ever, require surgical intervention. Even a grade III tear.
Ahh as long as the stability of the knee joint has not been compromised, am I right?
 
biguglynewf

biguglynewf

TID Board Of Directors
Oct 11, 2010
694
143
#18
Ahh as long as the stability of the knee joint has not been compromised, am I right?
From what I have read it doesn;t matter. The mcl main purpose is to keep the knee from "widening" at the joint and although important in the overall stability of the knee it is not necessarily directly accountable for stabilty as you seem to be indicating. The key to rehabbing an mcl injury for the most part is doing the right things up front. The mcl will repair itself and the person will be able to resume to their pre-injury status as long as they rehab properly. This may include the use of a brace to help with prevention of further injury and joint stability if need be. Repairs are done in some cases and apparently these procedures are somewhat controversial in the medical community. Repairs are sometimes completed for something that is known as a grade IV tear (usually grade III is a complete tear) but this includes more than a damaged mcl and hence the potential need for surgery in this case. Apparently there has been no evidence in better function post rehab between those that were operated on and those whom chose to let the injury heal on its own.

My mcl was torn when my knee was injured but there was no surgery required as the ligament repaired itself. The acl and the meniscus were another story....That hasn;t ended yet I might add.
 
Mindlesswork

Mindlesswork

Crusty Poo Butt
Sep 21, 2010
1,395
33
#19
From what I have read it doesn;t matter. The mcl main purpose is to keep the knee from "widening" at the joint and although important in the overall stability of the knee it is not necessarily directly accountable for stabilty as you seem to be indicating. The key to rehabbing an mcl injury for the most part is doing the right things up front. The mcl will repair itself and the person will be able to resume to their pre-injury status as long as they rehab properly. This may include the use of a brace to help with prevention of further injury and joint stability if need be. Repairs are done in some cases and apparently these procedures are somewhat controversial in the medical community. Repairs are sometimes completed for something that is known as a grade IV tear (usually grade III is a complete tear) but this includes more than a damaged mcl and hence the potential need for surgery in this case. Apparently there has been no evidence in better function post rehab between those that were operated on and those whom chose to let the injury heal on its own.

My mcl was torn when my knee was injured but there was no surgery required as the ligament repaired itself. The acl and the meniscus were another story....That hasn;t ended yet I might add.
Thanks for the info...and hope you are able to get things put right with your knees as well.
 
Purplehaze

Purplehaze

Member
Aug 25, 2010
92
15
#20
From what I have read it doesn;t matter. The mcl main purpose is to keep the knee from "widening" at the joint and although important in the overall stability of the knee it is not necessarily directly accountable for stabilty as you seem to be indicating. The key to rehabbing an mcl injury for the most part is doing the right things up front. The mcl will repair itself and the person will be able to resume to their pre-injury status as long as they rehab properly. This may include the use of a brace to help with prevention of further injury and joint stability if need be. Repairs are done in some cases and apparently these procedures are somewhat controversial in the medical community. Repairs are sometimes completed for something that is known as a grade IV tear (usually grade III is a complete tear) but this includes more than a damaged mcl and hence the potential need for surgery in this case. Apparently there has been no evidence in better function post rehab between those that were operated on and those whom chose to let the injury heal on its own.

My mcl was torn when my knee was injured but there was no surgery required as the ligament repaired itself. The acl and the meniscus were another story....That hasn;t ended yet I might add.
Correct..For most, the mcl rarely has a tear bad enough to require surgery to fix it..Most of the time it will heal..I have torn my acl several times and have had problems with meniscus...The last time I tore my knee, I decided against surgery...After a while, it is just not worth it..
 
Mindlesswork

Mindlesswork

Crusty Poo Butt
Sep 21, 2010
1,395
33
#21
Correct..For most, the mcl rarely has a tear bad enough to require surgery to fix it..Most of the time it will heal..I have torn my acl several times and have had problems with meniscus...The last time I tore my knee, I decided against surgery...After a while, it is just not worth it..
I have both acl's frayed but not torn and a damaged meniscus in my left...never had surgery, but my left has stability issues that may need surgery though
 
biguglynewf

biguglynewf

TID Board Of Directors
Oct 11, 2010
694
143
#22
Correct..For most, the mcl rarely has a tear bad enough to require surgery to fix it..Most of the time it will heal..I have torn my acl several times and have had problems with meniscus...The last time I tore my knee, I decided against surgery...After a while, it is just not worth it..
How many times? And how was it done?
 
Purplehaze

Purplehaze

Member
Aug 25, 2010
92
15
#23
Twice fixed in right..First was patella tendon then cadaver...Torn them playing sports in HS and then in college..Recently reinjured same knee...
 
Purplehaze

Purplehaze

Member
Aug 25, 2010
92
15
#24
I got a bad staph infection one time... They had to go back and cut the knee open pack it with gauze and have a IV line and fanny pack like a big ol pussy for a few weeks..Can't remember the total time it took for the infection to go away and it be closed back up...Was a son of a bitch......Had a nurse stop by my house everyday to change the bag and gauze in my knee...
 
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