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Is too much change too often bad?

barbellbeast

barbellbeast

MuscleHead
Oct 4, 2010
342
43
#1
The drop-set post brought up changing up your routine, but I thought it would be best to start a new thread instead of thread-jack. I change what exercises I do every workout. I change rep-scheme and additional adjustments(like drop-sets, rest-pause and pyramiding schemes) every workout as well. The thing I've pondered is whether this may actually hurt in a sense that my body is getting used to all tweaks I try to make since I change them each time I step into the gym? The title might be a better way to word the question.
 
W

Wolf

MuscleHead
Dec 25, 2010
274
45
#2
Well, change for the sake of change isn't ideal. Adjustments that create a specific, desirable result is what you want to focus on when you change up your routine. At the end of the day your body will become more efficient at whatever you push it to do, the challenge is finding ways to add new stressors that contribute to continued success. Adding in a variety of work during the week, variations of compound lifts, pausing, bands, chains, different percentages of the 1rm can be very helpful.
 
chicken_hawk

chicken_hawk

MuscleHead
Oct 28, 2010
718
149
#3
If thats you in your avi, than it looks like its workin for yah. However, you are violating a basic physiological principle called SAID. Or SpecificAdaptaion to Imposed Demand which oversimplified states that your body adapts best to repeated bouts of the same thing ie if you want to throw a baseball faster than throw baseballs, not a football. The key thing is that the body first needs to learn the movement which will take several bouts and then it will adapt physiologically to adapt to the specific stress.

Now I do not think you have do do the same thing EVERY Chest workout, maybe instead have two that you cycle over and over till they peter out. And honestly I am not sure what the optimum frequency would be, however most PLers like Tates crew and West Side have two diff workouts for each lift, each focusing of differing aspects of their sport, yet repeat those same workouts for 8 or more weeks.

Personally I have a slow paced low rep day and then a fast paced higher rep day. The low rep day focused on compound moves while the high rep day is more cables and isolation. I swear by it.

Hope that helped,
Hawk
 
omni

omni

Member
Jan 29, 2011
59
3
#5
I think that the stronger you become the more muscle will grow. I keep a log book and beat my numbers each week so I know I continue to progress. I can only do that if I use the same exercises. I use to train by instinct, changing thinks week to week, but never really got where I wanted. With a log book I feel that I have a plan and when I look at my book from previous years I've gained strength and weight every week.

Looking at your Avatar you look great. If it works for you then go for it.
 
hugerobb

hugerobb

VIP Strength Advisor
Sep 15, 2010
2,027
56
#6
change is good that way you keep the muscle confused
 
ZoDaddy

ZoDaddy

Member
Jan 29, 2011
18
0
#7
I do 4-6 week blocks. My theory is that gives the body enough time to adapt to the new stress, but not so much time to where it levels off and ceases to be effective. For example 4 weeks strength training, then 4 weeks focused on higher rep, less rest etc. Of course I train more for sports primarily, strength secondary, aesthetics third. So probably depends what your priority is. Seems like everyone adapts differently too. Like the others said, based on your avatar it ain't broke so don't fix it.
One other thing I like about the 4-6 week training cycle is the psychological effect. It allows me to focus and push through tough programs, knowing that there will be a time of rest down the road. Also the periodic change keeps things interesting, gives me new goals to focus on. Don't think I could lift for years just trying to improve my bench, but we are all different.
 
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