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Is there such thing as losing weight yet the waist is the same size?

W

whatsup

Senior Member
Apr 11, 2017
229
11
#1
I've been working out and doing cardio for 6 months. Some people have complimented me but my waist or abdomen is the same.
I consume around 1500 calories daily if at that.
 
mjbanks

mjbanks

Member
Nov 4, 2015
30
8
#2
yeah, because there are muscles like hip flexors, obliques, abs, core, etc, that all if for example you're doing side bends without weights in one hand then it becomes a cardio exercise, burning fat and teaching muscle memory, teaching muscle fibers repetition and reflex, but if you use a lot of weight than the side bend can induce those muscles to recruit more muscle fiber, and muscles growing from the tearing of the exercise itself and regrowth during repair/rest period - and if those muscles are pumped-up after general cardio like running or a long performance workouts, good blood circulation has those muscles hydrated, and even if not targeted you have to examine what other exercises incorporate the abs, i.e. pushups or squats or whatever.


“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”
Hippocrates
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Dec 25, 2010
4,346
1,590
#3
It can depend on many factors. If you are already very lean, then the waist size is dictated primarily by your bone structure, and thus losing weight won't greatly affect waist size. If you're more "normal" in bodyfat percentage (e.g., 12-30%),then it likely depends on where you tend to hold a lot of you fat, which can be driven by your gender and other genetic characteristics.

For example, for me, I tend to gain fat first right around my lower back and love handles. Because that is where I first gain the weight, it's also the last place to shed the fat. (i.e., first on, last off). Many guys who carry their bodyfat around their beltline will see a change in waist size as they lose weight. Some women will, but other women will see a more dramatic reduction in the hips/butt area first.

What are your stats: height, weight, waist size, etc. We might be able to give you some diet input knowing some more information.
 
W

whatsup

Senior Member
Apr 11, 2017
229
11
#4
It can depend on many factors. If you are already very lean, then the waist size is dictated primarily by your bone structure, and thus losing weight won't greatly affect waist size. If you're more "normal" in bodyfat percentage (e.g., 12-30%),then it likely depends on where you tend to hold a lot of you fat, which can be driven by your gender and other genetic characteristics.

For example, for me, I tend to gain fat first right around my lower back and love handles. Because that is where I first gain the weight, it's also the last place to shed the fat. (i.e., first on, last off). Many guys who carry their bodyfat around their beltline will see a change in waist size as they lose weight. Some women will, but other women will see a more dramatic reduction in the hips/butt area first.

What are your stats: height, weight, waist size, etc. We might be able to give you some diet input knowing some more information.
I'm 5ft3 and weigh around 168lbs. I eat omelet in the morning with bacon and lunch a yogurt with grapes and chicken salad. For dinner a fistfull of rice with streak or chicken. I also take 72 grams of protein powder daily not counting what's in the food.
 
CFM

CFM

VIP Member
Mar 18, 2012
568
321
#5
Water weight goes, then the fat. Fat takes time. In my experience too few calories results in muscle loss as the body fights to maintain energy storage by keeping the fat.

Set a one year goal. Cut sugars, then cut higher glycemic carbs and stagger your fat intake and keep protein constant. The mirror is best, the scale makes us nuts.

My waist and belly fat always goes last.............you're not alone.
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Dec 25, 2010
4,346
1,590
#6
I'm 5ft3 and weigh around 168lbs. I eat omelet in the morning with bacon and lunch a yogurt with grapes and chicken salad. For dinner a fistfull of rice with streak or chicken. I also take 72 grams of protein powder daily not counting what's in the food.
Are you male or female? The food you listed above isn't too bad. Generally speaking a normal metabolism for a male is about 15kcal/day per pound of lean mass. Therefore if you want to lose fat you need to take in less than your base amount, for example, about 12 kcal/day per pound of lean mass. You don't want to cut calories too severely, as your body is a dynamic system and will adjust your metabolism based on the drastic change in calories. As a silly example, your body upon seeing a drastic drop in calories, thinks it's starving and your metabolism drops to conserve energy. Thus you want to reduce calories gradually, and spread the calories out evenly in multiple small meals.

I've seen some people disagree with this, and state that it doesn't matter when you consume the calories, but I disagree with that. You want to spread out your total number of calories in 5-7 small meals throughout the day. For example, your breakfast would be meal #1, a protein shake meal #2 (e.g., 10am),and lunch would be meal #3, a protein shake meal #4 (e.g., 4pm),dinner meal #5, etc. Smaller meals dampens the insulin response, and keeps your metabolism chugging along.

Also, keep hydrated by keeping your water intake high. Dehydration results in a lowering of your metabolism.

GMS is correct, that low glycemic carbs (e.g., brown rice, green veggies, sweet potatoes) are better than high glycemic carbs (white bread, pasta, sweets),as the amount of glucose dumped into your bloodstream is less fast, and consequently your insulin release is also less. Think of those days when you eat a big plate of pasta at lunch, and then want to take a nap at 2pm in the afternoon? Your blood sugar shot up from the high glycemic carbs, your pancreas releases a truck load of insulin to metabolize the glucose in your bloodstream, and overshoots, causing your blood sugar to drop and you feel sleepy. So your blood sugar and insulin is bouncing up and down, which reduces your metabolism. Low glycemic carbs cause the glucose to dump into the bloodstream more gradually, and the release of insulin is then also less, so your levels aren't bouncing all over the place.
 
W

whatsup

Senior Member
Apr 11, 2017
229
11
#7
Are you male or female? The food you listed above isn't too bad. Generally speaking a normal metabolism for a male is about 15kcal/day per pound of lean mass. Therefore if you want to lose fat you need to take in less than your base amount, for example, about 12 kcal/day per pound of lean mass. You don't want to cut calories too severely, as your body is a dynamic system and will adjust your metabolism based on the drastic change in calories. As a silly example, your body upon seeing a drastic drop in calories, thinks it's starving and your metabolism drops to conserve energy. Thus you want to reduce calories gradually, and spread the calories out evenly in multiple small meals.

I've seen some people disagree with this, and state that it doesn't matter when you consume the calories, but I disagree with that. You want to spread out your total number of calories in 5-7 small meals throughout the day. For example, your breakfast would be meal #1, a protein shake meal #2 (e.g., 10am),and lunch would be meal #3, a protein shake meal #4 (e.g., 4pm),dinner meal #5, etc. Smaller meals dampens the insulin response, and keeps your metabolism chugging along.

Also, keep hydrated by keeping your water intake high. Dehydration results in a lowering of your metabolism.

GMS is correct, that low glycemic carbs (e.g., brown rice, green veggies, sweet potatoes) are better than high glycemic carbs (white bread, pasta, sweets),as the amount of glucose dumped into your bloodstream is less fast, and consequently your insulin release is also less. Think of those days when you eat a big plate of pasta at lunch, and then want to take a nap at 2pm in the afternoon? Your blood sugar shot up from the high glycemic carbs, your pancreas releases a truck load of insulin to metabolize the glucose in your bloodstream, and overshoots, causing your blood sugar to drop and you feel sleepy. So your blood sugar and insulin is bouncing up and down, which reduces your metabolism. Low glycemic carbs cause the glucose to dump into the bloodstream more gradually, and the release of insulin is then also less, so your levels aren't bouncing all over the place.
I'm a 44 year old male. Yeah your advice makes sense. I'll try that as best I can. It's hard at times.
 
W

whatsup

Senior Member
Apr 11, 2017
229
11
#8
Is 6 months of weight training enough time to have built some muscle?
 
IronInsanity

IronInsanity

TID Board Of Directors
May 3, 2011
2,940
633
#9
You can't spot reduce fat. It makes up its own mind where it comes off.
 
W

whatsup

Senior Member
Apr 11, 2017
229
11
#10
Are you male or female? The food you listed above isn't too bad. Generally speaking a normal metabolism for a male is about 15kcal/day per pound of lean mass. Therefore if you want to lose fat you need to take in less than your base amount, for example, about 12 kcal/day per pound of lean mass. You don't want to cut calories too severely, as your body is a dynamic system and will adjust your metabolism based on the drastic change in calories. As a silly example, your body upon seeing a drastic drop in calories, thinks it's starving and your metabolism drops to conserve energy. Thus you want to reduce calories gradually, and spread the calories out evenly in multiple small meals.

I've seen some people disagree with this, and state that it doesn't matter when you consume the calories, but I disagree with that. You want to spread out your total number of calories in 5-7 small meals throughout the day. For example, your breakfast would be meal #1, a protein shake meal #2 (e.g., 10am),and lunch would be meal #3, a protein shake meal #4 (e.g., 4pm),dinner meal #5, etc. Smaller meals dampens the insulin response, and keeps your metabolism chugging along.

Also, keep hydrated by keeping your water intake high. Dehydration results in a lowering of your metabolism.

GMS is correct, that low glycemic carbs (e.g., brown rice, green veggies, sweet potatoes) are better than high glycemic carbs (white bread, pasta, sweets),as the amount of glucose dumped into your bloodstream is less fast, and consequently your insulin release is also less. Think of those days when you eat a big plate of pasta at lunch, and then want to take a nap at 2pm in the afternoon? Your blood sugar shot up from the high glycemic carbs, your pancreas releases a truck load of insulin to metabolize the glucose in your bloodstream, and overshoots, causing your blood sugar to drop and you feel sleepy. So your blood sugar and insulin is bouncing up and down, which reduces your metabolism. Low glycemic carbs cause the glucose to dump into the bloodstream more gradually, and the release of insulin is then also less, so your levels aren't bouncing all over the place.
Is six months enough time to have built some muscle?
 
tommyguns2

tommyguns2

Senior Moderators
Staff Member
Dec 25, 2010
4,346
1,590
#11
6 months of time is sufficient to build some muscle, as long as you've trained hard and eaten properly. Building muscle while concurrently losing fat is quite difficult, unless you have extraordinary genetics. Nevertheless, for someone relatively new to training, I think it's reasonably to gain about 5 pounds of lean mass over a period of six months.

When I was training very seriously and very hard, I gained about 5 pounds of muscle and lost about 5 pounds of fat every year for almost 10 years. Dropping the fat and building a small amount of muscle will result in quite a body transformation. Just be patent and stick with it.
 
W

whatsup

Senior Member
Apr 11, 2017
229
11
#12
6 months of time is sufficient to build some muscle, as long as you've trained hard and eaten properly. Building muscle while concurrently losing fat is quite difficult, unless you have extraordinary genetics. Nevertheless, for someone relatively new to training, I think it's reasonably to gain about 5 pounds of lean mass over a period of six months.

When I was training very seriously and very hard, I gained about 5 pounds of muscle and lost about 5 pounds of fat every year for almost 10 years. Dropping the fat and building a small amount of muscle will result in quite a body transformation. Just be patent and stick with it.
People have said I've lost and my wife says I'm wider from the shoulders. My chest I think is bigger too. Problem is I still have fat.
When I first started I weighed 170 and during 2 months of weights and cardio I weighed 162 BUT fast forward 6 months later and I'm 168. I think it could be because I gained a little muscle.
 
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