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High school football training

Snachito1

Snachito1

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Jan 12, 2018
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One of my good buddies is a local high school football coach and they lost their weight conditioning coach so he has to take that over along with coaching/teaching . My buddy asked me if I could help, but I have no experience in that area, so I come
to you brethren can anyone recommend a good book, or DVD that can help us out. The team really only has like 2 hours a week to lift, but hopefully we can squeeze some good training once
we get it. Thanks in advanced!!
 
DieYoungStrong

DieYoungStrong

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May 27, 2013
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Sorry bros. My wife is recovering from a pretty major spine surgery and I haven't been around.

3 questions - 1. what's the lifting schedule (I'm assuming it's 2-3 days a week after school?) 2. What do you have for available equipment at the weight room? 3. How big is the program - How many kids you expect in the weight room at most sessions?
 
DieYoungStrong

DieYoungStrong

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May 27, 2013
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Hit up Wendlers website. He has tons of vids talking about the programming he does for kids he coaches.

Good advice right here. Wendler's stuff is great for HS athletes. Everyone here has a lifting background so learning a few things shouldn't be hard.

Football players need to do hang cleans and explosive work. They aren't bodybuilders - they're athletes.
 
R

rawdeal

TID Board Of Directors
Nov 29, 2013
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. . . .
Football players need to do hang cleans and explosive work. They aren't bodybuilders - they're athletes.
And so sayeth Bill Starr, whose book may have popularized the notion of strength training for other (any) sports ... and who may have suggested a whole new job for NCAA and NFL teams to include on their payrolls.


Starr, btw, briefly held the Deadlift record at 198 back when PL was just beginning to supercede Americans' interest in OL, but he thought strength training for sports was about more than OL, PL, or BB.
 
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Snachito1

Snachito1

VIP Member
Jan 12, 2018
304
254
Sorry bros. My wife is recovering from a pretty major spine surgery and I haven't been around.

3 questions - 1. what's the lifting schedule (I'm assuming it's 2-3 days a week after school?) 2. What do you have for available equipment at the weight room? 3. How big is the program - How many kids you expect in the weight room at most sessions?
I'll find out about the lifting schedule and I know they have a full set up gym. As far as how many kids I'll find that out to today. Thank you and I wish your wife a full recovery from surgery!!
 
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Snachito1

Snachito1

VIP Member
Jan 12, 2018
304
254
And so sayeth Bill Starr, whose book may have popularized the notion of strength training for other (any) sports ... and who may have suggested a whole new job for NCAA and NFL teams to include on their payrolls.


Starr, btw, briefly held the Deadlift record at 198 back when PL was just beginning to supercede Americans' interest in OL, but he thought strength training for sports was about more than OL, PL, or BB.
This program was exactly what I first thought of when my buddy came to me.
 
DieYoungStrong

DieYoungStrong

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May 27, 2013
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Bill Starr was an OG pioneer for strength training in sports. "Only the Strong Survive".

As much as people shit on him - Mark Rippetoe was a Bill Starr disciple. And their stuff flat out works for beginning novice lifters - ie high school athletes. When the young guns are starting out with the big compound movements - they are learning the skill as much as they are getting strong. They can't tap in to their true strength until they have enough skill to safely and succesfully perform the lifts. This is why they can and should run linear progression programs for as long as possible. They get "stronger" as their technique gets better just as much as actual strength games. Then they really tap into the newbie games as their form gets good, and you can ride the linear progession wave for at least 6 months usually.

From there you need to start a more periodized program - and 5/3/1 variations work great for young guns. But if you don't ride the linear progession wave for as long as possible while getting their tecnique down - you're wasting valuable time.

The most important thing is to never ever ever ever forget rule 1 for training athletes for their sport - DO NOT LET THEM GET HURT DURING TRAINING. Athletes get hurt on the field enough. They cannot get injured in the gym. And if they get hurt in the gym - it's on the strength coach. He's either not programming them properly and they are getting hurt. Or, he is not supervising them properly, and they are doing dumb teenage shit and getting hurt. If left unsurpervised you will turn your back and find a kid who deadlifts 275 with 405 on the bar cat backing and hitching his way up to tell his buddies he got 405. Don't let it happen.

Serious high school and college athletes are the funnest to train. Have fun with it and enjoy.
 
R

rawdeal

TID Board Of Directors
Nov 29, 2013
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Lol, afaik it was Starr who coined the phrase "curlies for the girlies," to describe a category of exercises everyone likes to do whether or not they are the most productive.
 
S

schultz1

Bangs Raiden's mom VIP
Jan 3, 2011
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Vast majority of their training should be in the 65-70% range. Im a believer in building muscle first and foremast, the strength will come. Muscle is the armor that protects everything else.
 
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