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Help: Squat Form Tip

M

Mike A

Member
Jul 14, 2018
11
0
#13
THATS NOT A BOX ,!
Okay, please explain what you mean. How is this different from an actual box? I have used both and both work the same. It’s a surface to feel like you are sitting back on and work on sitting back during a squat. How is a shoulder press chair any different from an actual box.
 
monsoon

monsoon

Senior Bacon VIP
Nov 1, 2010
3,702
946
#14
Too small, too high, has a back and is not adjustable for height. Also would probably tip over if you sat back on it.
 
M

Mike A

Member
Jul 14, 2018
11
0
#15
Too small, too high, has a back and is not adjustable for height. Also would probably tip over if you sat back on it.
Okay I understand. Thank you for that feedback!

So before I chose the shoulder press chair, I was using an actual box for squatting that was much lower and below parallel. I noticed more pain in my knees when I went lower so I decided to come up in height of the box. I chose the shoulder press chair because it was right at or slightly above my parallel. Any chance you have any ideas why the lower one caused more pain?
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,388
2,614
#16
I have normally squated in the past without a box but switched because I heard it’s a good way to fix form issues. So I moved to the box squat hoping to figure out why I was getting pain in knees when doing any type of squat. So is box squatting above parallel what is causing this? I’m still confused on what you are trying to say.

Why is a shoulder press chair a problem? Too high?

What do you mean by raw lifter?

And I do not do leg ext.
Problem with the chair is you can't sit back properly and perform a correct box squat. Also, you don't touch and go with box squats. When performing box squats your shins will be more vertical because you'll be sitting back more. You'll want to widen your stance, turn your toes out, and sit back onto the box when box squatting. Some like box squats, I personally don't, but that's neither here nor there.

Raw = not equipped. I don't believe you're wearing briefs and you're not wearing a suit. Raw would be a belt, sleeves, and even knee wraps. Equipped changes the mechanics of the lift in the sense of how you perform the lift.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,388
2,614
#17
The fact that you said you've used both a box and that seat, tells us you haven't used an actual box for box squats.
 
M

Mike A

Member
Jul 14, 2018
11
0
#18
Problem with the chair is you can't sit back properly and perform a correct box squat. Also, you don't touch and go with box squats. When performing box squats your shins will be more vertical because you'll be sitting back more. You'll want to widen your stance, turn your toes out, and sit back onto the box when box squatting. Some like box squats, I personally don't, but that's neither here nor there.

Raw = not equipped. I don't believe you're wearing briefs and you're not wearing a suit. Raw would be a belt, sleeves, and even knee wraps. Equipped changes the mechanics of the lift in the sense of how you perform the lift.
So would it be better for a person with knee pain to forego the box squat? I am trying to figure out the best way to squat pain free.

The fact that you said you've used both a box and that seat, tells us you haven't used an actual box for box squats.
So would this not be a box?
 

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monsoon

monsoon

Senior Bacon VIP
Nov 1, 2010
3,702
946
#19
Try adjusting your stance to see if going wider and pushing your knees out makes a difference in the knee pain. If you can't squat at all without pain try a split squat.
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,388
2,614
#20
That's a plyo box and not a box squat box but you can use it as one. I'd get a piece of high density foam from home depot and cut it to fit that plyo box.

I'd widen your stance, duck your feet, sit back, and pause on the box when performing the movement.

My opinion about box squat has nothing to do with pain. It doesn't create pain. The more vertical your shins are the less forward knee travel you'll have and the less sheering force on your knees. I've had complete knee replacements (I have cadavers knees; both) and I squat with some forward knee travel. Now, I do low bar squat so my forward knee travel is very minimal but most have shoulder pain, elbow pain, and wrist pain from low bar squats. You have to find what works for YOU, but perform the lifts correctly while using the correct equipment.
 
M

Mike A

Member
Jul 14, 2018
11
0
#21
I decided to film a short clip of me squatting without a box for some feedback as well.

 
G

Grizzly911

Member
Jun 17, 2018
80
12
#22
The depth is better but the knees go to far over the feet which can add pain to the knees that way, need a wider stance to keep the shins more vertical when you go down to prevent knee pain. Just widen your stance a little more and that's a home run.
 
M

Mike A

Member
Jul 14, 2018
11
0
#23
The depth is better but the knees go to far over the feet which can add pain to the knees that way, need a wider stance to keep the shins more vertical when you go down to prevent knee pain. Just widen your stance a little more and that's a home run.
What about the bend in my back and the travel of the bar as I go down? I know the bar should travel in a straight line but it doesn’t really in the video. I also notice my pelvis is not directly below my sternum the entire repetition. How do I go about fixing this? Or is the form more solid then I think?
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,388
2,614
#24
You should keep a neutral spine when performing a squats. It's it's rounded at the top or hyper extended towards the bottom, both will cause potential injury and not be mechanically safe in performing the movements.

You look to be a bit hyper extended in your lower back when performing that squat. You want to draw the bar down with your lats, brace your torson, sit back, and squat.
 
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