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Erythrocytosis or polycythemia or thick blood.................

CFM

CFM

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Mar 18, 2012
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Other than donating blood has our bro-science community developed other strategies to reduce hemoglobin and hematocrit levels resulting from AAS?
 
JackD

JackD

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Sep 16, 2010
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I cut out red meat and keep iron intake low. I can get away with 1 or 2 blood donations a year now. Otherwise there isn’t anything other than blood letting to solve this issue.
 
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BD Cool

BD Cool

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Dec 1, 2011
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I cut out red meat and keep iron intake low. I can get away with 1 or 2 blood donations a year now. Otherwise there isn’t anything other than blood letting to solve this issue.
Same here. I still eat red meat but not everyday like I once did.
 
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parttimer

parttimer

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Oct 11, 2011
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I don't think cardio will fix it. From what I've read, cardio may lead to blood clots and stroke in patients with high rbc. Same holds true for any strenuous activity for people with thick blood. As posted above, blood letting or reduction in rbc creating foods is about it.

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MorganKane

MorganKane

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Nov 12, 2012
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Im not aware of any other way to "fix" that besides phlebotomies. im looking for a way and is a bit desperate.
I have had 2 blood clots. I might still have one but not been checked in a while. one led to a pulmonary embolism.
Im on blood thinners now.

The problem for me (and others) with phlebotomies is that it lowers my iron or ferritin levels.
Mine got so low (19) that I thought I was loosing my mind, literarily. I had to get an iron infusion.
I have a few issues regarding iron absorptions since I had a part of my colon taken out and I have to use a PPI to deal with heartburns.
I see a hematology doctor for this.

If you find a solution I would love to hear it.
 
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BFN

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Dec 21, 2015
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I don't think cardio will fix it. From what I've read, cardio may lead to blood clots and stroke in patients with high rbc. Same holds true for any strenuous activity for people with thick blood. As posted above, blood letting or reduction in rbc creating foods is about it.

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From personal experience, cardio will absolutely lower RBC/Hematocrit. It takes time though.
 
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Wilson6

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Dec 17, 2019
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From personal experience, cardio will absolutely lower RBC/Hematocrit. It takes time though.
Hemodilution as cardio expands plasma volume. On the flip side, a long run on a hot day can send viscosity through the roof.
 
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Wilson6

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Dec 17, 2019
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It has never been shown that the erythrocytosis from androgens leads to the same problems as diseases such as PCV. We assume it does and treat based on that assumption, and at extremes HCT > 55% I'd start to worry but I think the phlebos get overdone. I too have high HCT and low ferritin, but normal blood levels of iron. In addition, hypoferritinemia without anemia can produce Sx similar to Fe defn, but under what conditions? If your intake and absorption of dietary Fe is adequate to maintain normal circulating levels of Fe, does it make a difference. What else does ferritin do? Hemotologists I've talked to can't answer that and if you increase Fe intake, you'll accelerate the erythrocytosis, I tried that. Did not change ferritin conc but shot up Hb/HCT.
 
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Wilson6

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Dec 17, 2019
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I don't think cardio will fix it. From what I've read, cardio may lead to blood clots and stroke in patients with high rbc. Same holds true for any strenuous activity for people with thick blood. As posted above, blood letting or reduction in rbc creating foods is about it.

Sent from my SM-S908U using Tapatalk
I've never heard of cardio increasing clots and strokes, in what population? Any lit citations? Only time its been an issue, maybe is in endurance athletes abusing EPO and getting dehydrated.
 
genetic freak

genetic freak

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Dec 28, 2015
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From personal experience, cardio will absolutely lower RBC/Hematocrit. It takes time though.
Same. I would run 15-35 miles a week when in the Corps and RBC/HCT were always normal. I retired and 6 months later when I did my physical my RBC/HCT shot through the roof. Everything remained the same except I was no longer doing cardio. Doc said start doing cardio again, so I started doing 30-60 minutes of slow steady state cardio every day. After 6 months my RBC/HCT were back in normal range. Had a relapse in cardio and RBC/HCT were above normal again. Now I am doing 20-60 minutes cardio every day, either HIIT or slow steady state. I am back in the normal range and have stayed there.
 
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