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DOMS

dk8594

dk8594

Member
Apr 16, 2018
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Trying to do some research.

Can anyone cite some studies as to whether DOMS should be taken as a evidence of an effective workout or if experiencing it should be viewed negatively?


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R

rawdeal

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Nov 29, 2013
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I am cite-less, but I am full of hunches ... or something. Some DOMS is evidence of an effective workout, but it depends on the intensity and the duration. The absence of DOMS may indicate you're doing too little; extreme DOMS may indicate you're doing too much. Taken to a worst-case level that could lead to Rhabdomyolosis.

All my hunch shit brings up the related question of what do you do the next scheduled training day if the DOMS persists. My approach would be to back off a day if the DOMS is extreme, but the answer is less clear if the DOMS is just "pretty noticeable."
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

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I don't have the sources on hand but I've never taken DOMs as a means of determining whether a workout was effective or not. You can track muscle growth or poundages lifted and see the trend line.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

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Aug 14, 2012
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Trying to do some research.

Can anyone cite some studies as to whether DOMS should be taken as a evidence of an effective workout or if experiencing it should be viewed negatively?

First off, while the soreness associated with DOMS is real, up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. We do know that it seems to happen when you do an activity that you are not accustom to so it is most likely and adaptation to an unfamiliar stress and has nothing to do with muscular growth. You can certainly grow well with no DOMs at all and there is evidence to suggest this.

The below study compared a non-trained group with a trained group doing the same exercise. Only the non-trained group reported DOMS. Both groups increased muscular strength and muscular size. So DOMS was not considered a factor.
https://jeb.biologists.org/content/214/4/674

There is also research that suggests that the soreness felt from DOMS is not from damaged muscle fibers but more so from the connective tissues.
https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1113/jphysiol.2007.128827
 
dk8594

dk8594

Member
Apr 16, 2018
19
23
First off, while the soreness associated with DOMS is real, up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. We do know that it seems to happen when you do an activity that you are not accustom to so it is most likely and adaptation to an unfamiliar stress and has nothing to do with muscular growth. You can certainly grow well with no DOMs at all and there is evidence to suggest this.

The below study compared a non-trained group with a trained group doing the same exercise. Only the non-trained group reported DOMS. Both groups increased muscular strength and muscular size. So DOMS was not considered a factor.
https://jeb.biologists.org/content/214/4/674

There is also research that suggests that the soreness felt from DOMS is not from damaged muscle fibers but more so from the connective tissues.
https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1113/jphysiol.2007.128827

Thanks [mention]Bigtex [/mention]. This was the kind of stuff I had been looking for. I am not sure how to take that it’s an indication of damage to connective tissue, but interesting insight.

I have never nailed down a cause but don’t get as sore since I have been on testosterone. Trying to figure out what it means.


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