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Doctors advice

Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
200
208
#13
Do you know how much nutrition training the average doctor gets in medical school?
A research study was done on this same subject and found is that family medicine, internal medicine and OB-GYN medical residency programs averaged 2.8 hours of instruction on obesity, nutrition and physical activity counseling, and only 42 percent of them taught the residents techniques for how to perform health behavior counseling.

Another recent study assessed the basic nutritional knowledge of fourth-year medical/osteopathic school graduates entering a pediatric residency program and found that on average, the incoming interns answered only 52 percent of the 18 questions correctly.

So many doctors want to get involved in nutrition because they are making money selling diet foods/supplements.
 
Zomb131

Zomb131

VIP Member
Jan 31, 2011
1,113
256
#14
A research study was done on this same subject and found is that family medicine, internal medicine and OB-GYN medical residency programs averaged 2.8 hours of instruction on obesity, nutrition and physical activity counseling, and only 42 percent of them taught the residents techniques for how to perform health behavior counseling.

Another recent study assessed the basic nutritional knowledge of fourth-year medical/osteopathic school graduates entering a pediatric residency program and found that on average, the incoming interns answered only 52 percent of the 18 questions correctly.

So many doctors want to get involved in nutrition because they are making money selling diet foods/supplements.
That's unfortuate that DO's scored just as low as MD's. I'd take a DO over an MD any day because of their ideology of medicine, or supposed ideology.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
200
208
#15
Here are the two studies........

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27402722

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26234947

Apparently many medical school offer more nutrition hours but most don't bother taking them. I will say this.....education continues past graduation for most professionals. I had almost 30 hours of nutrition in my studies but learned much more after graduating and continuing with reading research. Some doctors may share this interest and do the same.
 
Zomb131

Zomb131

VIP Member
Jan 31, 2011
1,113
256
#16
Here are the two studies........

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27402722

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26234947

Apparently many medical school offer more nutrition hours but most don't bother taking them. I will say this.....education continues past graduation for most professionals. I had almost 30 hours of nutrition in my studies but learned much more after graduating and continuing with reading research. Some doctors may share this interest and do the same.
I don't remember optional classes in grad school, lol!

Absolutely, you have to stay up on research and what's new coming down the pipeline. Don't want a patient asking about something and you having no idea. I see it hard to blame them for not knowing it all. Just think of all the crap MD/DO's need to know when seeing patients on a daily. That's why they refer out. My MD at the VA back home gave me a referal to see the nutritionist. I humored her and went. The nutriotinst looked at me and said, "you're obese?" Then we spent my hour talking about the use of insulin in bodybuilding. She was blown away to know there are other uses to insulin.
 
S

searay

VIP Member
Dec 20, 2017
232
136
#17
there all in a specialty field one way or the other. even your primary specializes in either internal medicine or he's a DO instead of an MD. my primary is an internal specialist MD and whenever I bring up my osteoarthritis he looks at me with this blank look on his face and says nothing after im done talking about it. hes more than happy to discuss my high rbc, or when am I have my colonoscopy or setting up a sleep study etc etc.
 
Bigtex

Bigtex

VIP Member
Aug 14, 2012
200
208
#18
I don't remember optional classes in grad school, lol!

Absolutely, you have to stay up on research and what's new coming down the pipeline. Don't want a patient asking about something and you having no idea. I see it hard to blame them for not knowing it all. Just think of all the crap MD/DO's need to know when seeing patients on a daily. That's why they refer out. My MD at the VA back home gave me a referal to see the nutritionist. I humored her and went. The nutriotinst looked at me and said, "you're obese?" Then we spent my hour talking about the use of insulin in bodybuilding. She was blown away to know there are other uses to insulin.

When I did my graduate work I fortunately had a few options too. I also did a double area of interest so I was able to some what pick and choose between exercise science and sport nutrition graduate level classes. I guess MD's have a lot of options depending on what they want to specialize in.

You know in some states it is against the law to practice nutrition without being a RD. Seems like you are right, the best thing doctors could do professionally is refer a patient to a registered dietitian instead of trying to practice in a field they are not competent in.

As you pointed out, my faith in registered dietitians is not so good either. I had a lot of trouble in nutrition because I though outside of the box. My professor was horrified that I was using creatine back in the early 90's. She was just as horrified that I was using protein supplements....after all it is not really food and definitely going to cause me kidney problems.

I also had a exercise physiology professor I always talked to. His office was loaded with books but they all were old, dusty and had spider webs on them. They guy had not updated his knowledge since he got his PhD. He thought I was crazy to actually think that you could be health lifting weights. After all aerobics was they only way.
 
T

The other Snake

VIP Member
Aug 19, 2016
205
186
#19
That's unfortuate that DO's scored just as low as MD's. I'd take a DO over an MD any day because of their ideology of medicine, or supposed ideology.
Couldn't agree more. My Dr. is a DO
 
T

The other Snake

VIP Member
Aug 19, 2016
205
186
#20
Side note; my wife does not want any weight loss or training advice from me. It's never mentioned in our house.
 
T

The other Snake

VIP Member
Aug 19, 2016
205
186
#21
One more example.

BW is back. TSH came in a out of range. It was a 3rd generation TSH and the over was 3.1, wife was at 4.2. The Dr. has referred her to a Hematologist. WTF, a Hematologist for a thyroid issue. Is there any reason this quack would not send her to an Endocrinologist right off the bat?

Regarding the number; to me, high is no good and she's already symptomatic for hypothyroid. Anyone been down this road?
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
389
89
#22
That's a more recent thing then. They probably remember very little of that 19 hours of training by the time they're done.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

This is really sad when diet is directly connected to health!...We are what we eat!!!!
 
Tuffoldman

Tuffoldman

VIP Member
May 23, 2011
647
283
#24
Doctors are people but I think a lot of them will overstep their specialty and spout off a lot of BS. If I go to the doctor right now they're going to say that I'm 20 lbs overweight and that is going to come from a doctor that's truly 50-plus pounds overweight. I'm below 8% body fat so how can I be 20 lb overweight they're still using the old BMI to determine healthy weight on people which is archaic.

Both my wife and I are on hormone replacement and we'll have been for many years until we figured out what was going on with her she spoke to lots of doctors and they all give her wonderful advice such as one told her if she would just set it aside one day a week to have sex with her husband that she would not have any more issues. What kind of stupid advice is that??? When your hormones are off the last thing a woman wants to do is going to have sex and feel like she's doing it because she has to how is that going to fix anything? Some doctors talk out of their asses and the sad part is so many people think that they know it all and they don't question.

Doctors are very educated in textbook health and overtime they do learn real life situations but not every two situations are the same and if you look at what they call what's your doctor does it's called practicing medicine so they are guessing that's the best results that they can come up with to give you some sort of result in the shortest amount of time. That's what we all want so if you say I want to lose weight and your doctor says oh you need to eat less food sure more than likely you're going to lose weight but you're not fixing a problem if it happens to be a metabolic issue or whatever. Complete blood work is important and a nice to be read by someone that is truly knowledgeable more than just looking at or everything's in the normal range because on thyroid t3 and t4 from things I've seen over the years are completely misdiagnosed because as long as they're both in the normal range most doctors will tell you there isn't an issue and that is incorrect. There are certain levels both t3 and t4 should be at and not just a normal range they need to be in the same range. Doctors over-prescribe and under prescribe way too much to "fix us" and for people like us on the board we know our bodies much better than them and we question. But most of the population is going to do exactly what the doctor tells them even if it's the worst advice ever. l tell people to always do your own research after you speak to your doctor and make sure you feel it's the right thing for you.
 
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