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Delt/Pec training question

M

maintain

Member
Sep 28, 2010
19
0
#1
Alright guys, my favorite chest exercise is incline bench. Ive got enuff mass in my lower pecs so I concentrate on incline for upper. The thing is my anterior delts get blasted this way and are starting to dominate my physique. Its all about proportion, so my question is how can I continue my upper pec development without my shoulders gettin in the way?
 
D

dropshot001

Member
Sep 15, 2010
65
0
#2
make sure that you keep your shoulder blades pinched back so that you get as little front delt as possible
 
Rein

Rein

MuscleHead
Sep 10, 2010
1,241
128
#3
By pre-exhausting your chest with incline dumbell flyes before you move to presses.
 
VULT

VULT

Member
Sep 25, 2010
17
2
#4
Pre-exhausting your chest will help to an extent, but ultimately you cannot keep your front delts out of your upper chest movements. It's the nature of the lift and your genetic predisposition. I have the same problem. My personal recommendation is to hit the other 2/3 of your delts equally as strong. Think about it, if your front delts are bigger than the rest of you shoulder line, aren't you going to need to bring the rest up anyway?
 
PozzSka

PozzSka

Senior Member
Sep 15, 2010
189
0
#5
make sure that you keep your shoulder blades pinched back so that you get as little front delt as possible
I disagree...this technique takes the pecs out of the movement.

Think about it...this is powerlifting basics. You pinch the shoulder blades back and the stress of the lift placed mainly on the delts and triceps, this is why powerlifters don't have great chests...they have great tri's, but no chest.

In Dave Tate's recent "so you think you can bench" series mentions this indirectly. When the subject was benching and didn't have his shoulder blades back tightly enough Dave could tell...He could tell because the kids chest flexed more than it should have, he said something like "i can see your chest flexing still, so I know you aren't tight." (paraphrased)

Personally, I notice that much of the stress on the delts occurs when bringing the bar down to the lower chest and bringing it back up over the face (think a front raise, bringing the weight up to the face is what your delts do). If you bring the bar down higher on your chest, you might be able to take more delt out of the move.
 
M

maintain

Member
Sep 28, 2010
19
0
#6
Thanks for all the replies! Ok, I do pinch the shoulder blades back to a certain extent. Mainly for stability. And I always bring the bar down almost collar bone level. Reinheart and Vult gave me an idea tho...Im gonna try pre-exhausting with incline press, then move on to heavy dumbbell flyes maybe cable flyes. then blast the other 2 delt heads
 
W1LL

W1LL

Member
Oct 5, 2010
27
3
#7
I disagree...this technique takes the pecs out of the movement.

Think about it...this is powerlifting basics. You pinch the shoulder blades back and the stress of the lift placed mainly on the delts and triceps, this is why powerlifters don't have great chests...they have great tri's, but no chest.

In Dave Tate's recent "so you think you can bench" series mentions this indirectly. When the subject was benching and didn't have his shoulder blades back tightly enough Dave could tell...He could tell because the kids chest flexed more than it should have, he said something like "i can see your chest flexing still, so I know you aren't tight." (paraphrased)

Personally, I notice that much of the stress on the delts occurs when bringing the bar down to the lower chest and bringing it back up over the face (think a front raise, bringing the weight up to the face is what your delts do). If you bring the bar down higher on your chest, you might be able to take more delt out of the move.
this^ anyone with a powerlifting background or have seen a how to video will tell you that the pinch shoulder blades automatically brings your elbows in and causes a more tricep dominant bench. at the same time i always do DB Incline press (not barbell) and actually have lagging front delts, maybe you should try switching to DBs and see how that works for yah.
 
meetcake

meetcake

VIP Member
Sep 29, 2010
129
9
#8
i like db's for incline and BB for flat/decline but gotta mix it up from time to time
 
pux888

pux888

MuscleHead
Oct 1, 2010
1,256
65
#9
When I needed to focus on upper chest BMF2 used to have me to incline flies high reps 4-5 sets to start the on to incline db presses with heavy poundage 4-5 sets. Then fill in the rest of you workout with what ever you please. Give that a go for 6 weeks or so.
 
MAYO

MAYO

Bad Mother
Sep 27, 2010
2,124
620
#10
When I needed to focus on upper chest BMF2 used to have me to incline flies high reps 4-5 sets to start the on to incline db presses with heavy poundage 4-5 sets. Then fill in the rest of you workout with what ever you please. Give that a go for 6 weeks or so.
^^^^das what I do.
 
PozzSka

PozzSka

Senior Member
Sep 15, 2010
189
0
#12
Speak for yourself... LOL...
Allow me to rephrase...this is why a powerlifting style bench press (shoulder blades back, big arch, elbows tucked) will be a less than optimal chest building exercise for most people. It is a heavy tri and delt style of press. Extra chest work can alleviate this deficiency.

Is that better? ;)
 
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