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Deadlift and Squat with Scoliosis

I

impolitek

TID Lady Member
Aug 2, 2015
19
0
#1
I have lumbar scoliosis, 20 degrees. Also, my left leg is 1cm shorter than the right leg. My question is: can I deadlift and squat without worrying with the progression of the curve? When I squat my foot alignment is different, my right leg stays a bit ahead of my right leg, so there's no imbalance, is this correct, am I doing something wrong? Thank you.
 
uphillclimb

uphillclimb

VIP Member
Dec 9, 2011
5,781
1,479
#2
I have scoliosis at the T6 along with a myriad of back injuries involving L4L5, C1C2 and sacrum.

Top lifts are in the mid-high 500's when I trained full time. So, with my chiropractor's knowledge plus daily usage of my inversion table, the resetting of the spine was kept more intact from the strength of my erectors.

As far as the lifting is concerned, my scoliosis never stopped me from going for a PR.
 
PillarofBalance

PillarofBalance

Strength Pimp
Feb 27, 2011
17,066
4,635
#3
I have scoliosis at the T6 along with a myriad of back injuries involving L4L5, C1C2 and sacrum.

Top lifts are in the mid-high 500's when I trained full time. So, with my chiropractor's knowledge plus daily usage of my inversion table, the resetting of the spine was kept more intact from the strength of my erectors.

As far as the lifting is concerned, my scoliosis never stopped me from going for a PR.
Yeah I picked up another one of you crooked back peeps the other day. Her squats are actually pretty decent lately. She used to avoid depth because of it. We found a good formula that worked for you though so it's back to that same template.
 
uphillclimb

uphillclimb

VIP Member
Dec 9, 2011
5,781
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#4
Yeah I picked up another one of you crooked back peeps the other day. Her squats are actually pretty decent lately. She used to avoid depth because of it. We found a good formula that worked for you though so it's back to that same template.
Stick with that plan then, that's my fallback option/"go-to". The upright nature of my squatting posture isn't for everyone.

The only thing (for people that don't train hard....like real hard) is the 15 doubles at RPE 8....that crippled me all 3 times that I was on that day whether squats or pulls, for about 3 days each time.
 
PillarofBalance

PillarofBalance

Strength Pimp
Feb 27, 2011
17,066
4,635
#5
I have lumbar scoliosis, 20 degrees. Also, my left leg is 1cm shorter than the right leg. My question is: can I deadlift and squat without worrying with the progression of the curve? When I squat my foot alignment is different, my right leg stays a bit ahead of my right leg, so there's no imbalance, is this correct, am I doing something wrong? Thank you.
I alluded to some things above. I can give you some general tips for how to train, but I can't really solve this issue for you. Here are just some guidelines:

1. Focus first on building muscle that supports the spine. So heavy squats and deads are good. As are good mornings and rows of all sorts. Do back 3x per week. This includes glutes too.

2. Do not ignore pain in your back especially the low back. If you aren't recovered from a previous session don't push your luck. Say you deadlift Friday and then come in to squat monday. If your back isn't recovered enough to squat with good technique don't squat. Flush the back instead with rows or extensions.

3. Pay attention to your ranges of motion. If you dip to one side as you squat and the opposite knee travels too far in or out compared to the other, use distraction stretches to balance it out. Test, stretch, retest.

4. Kind of similar to 3, but specifically make sure you address thoracic extension and hip extension. Eliminating pelvic tilt and maintaining thoracic extension will keep you in as close to the best position as possible.
 
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