Cracking and popping wrists

Discussion in 'Female Training Discussion' started by Janie, May 18, 2014.

  1. Jenner

    Jenner LeanMachine Staff Member

    Jan 9, 2012
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    really?

    who made you an expert?

    hell yes I would have the person using free weights, has nothing to do with what is being used. Proper form and the correct amount of weight and there is no issue
     
  2. Jenner

    Jenner LeanMachine Staff Member

    Jan 9, 2012
    2,455
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    you are kidding right???? LMAO
     
  3. raysd21

    raysd21 Senior Member

    Feb 6, 2014
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    I do have a sense of humor you know. The Mr. O part was a joke. But it is a semi advanced move for a complete beginner from my point of view Jen.:dbells:

    really?

    who made you an expert?

    Thanks for proving my point Jen I appreciate that. Did I say I was an expert? Why do you people keep putting words in my mouth? I don't get it.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2014
  4. Jenner

    Jenner LeanMachine Staff Member

    Jan 9, 2012
    2,455
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    well sure glad you were joking! :)

    I'm not sure what point you think I proved because I am saying if I were training a newbie, I would most certainly have them do upright rows as I do not feel that they are only for the advanced. :) That was my point
     
  5. sassy69

    sassy69 TID Lady Member

    Aug 16, 2011
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    At the risk of blowing it out of proportion, particularly for a newbie, they don't know what the hell they are doing. If I'm showing someone, lol like my mom, an exercise, the "exercise" is less important (and probably something completely foreign to the newbie), to get them to understand what the exercise is supposed to do - e.g. for back - the motion is a row. Chest up, and pull like you're rowing a boat. This applies to a seated cable row, a seated lat pull down, a DB row, a BB row and any of the different angle back machines. If they aren't comfortable doing one, then find a variation that "fits" them better. The point is to do a particular motion under resistance. That also removes a lot of the overwhelmingness of being introduces to training. It drives me batshit crazy when I see women grabbing a set of pink weights and a bench and doing every ****ing move they can think of w/ the same weights. They have no idea why they are doing any of it, but conveniently, they can use the same weights and stay on the same bench and feel like they're "working out". Ok whatever. But if you give the reason for the move in terms of something they can relate to, they can envision the motion and understand which muscles are engaged.

    All of that said, upright rows are the one thing I've had the biggest wrist problems with because it is a bit of an awkward motion. The angle the wrist may be restricted to because of the equipment being used can be a source of the issue. As I mentioned, I can't do shit w/ a straight bar w/o having a lot of wrist problems, but I rock socks w/ an ez bar. Dumbbells, kettle bells, a rope cable, a single or pair of cable grips or even a resistance band can also be used. If all of them are an issue, she might want to work on some wrist mobility and in the mean time just drop the upright row for a while. There are other options to exercise the same muscles, or certainly no one dies if she just doesn't do it right now. I'm sure there's plenty of other stuff that she's probably still working on getting familiar with.
     
  6. tightglutes

    tightglutes TID VIP Lady Member

    May 1, 2012
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    Back to the original post. I have the same problem Dallas. Painful wrists. Sometimes my popping makes it feel better. Anyway I always use my wraps I use these. http://image.bodyoutlet.net/500/x/s...billeder/Schiek/schiek_wrist-wraps_pink_1.png

    Especially on days I train back and biceps. Try to find a hand position that does not bother it. Also ice after working out and look into a supplement called cissus :) good luck girl
     
    Janie likes this.
  7. Janie

    Janie TID Lady Member

    May 8, 2014
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    Hiya, sorry not posted back for a few days been super busy. I'm 38 (owch that age hurts to type) I am medium build I am 5ft 6 new to all this so don't know all the tech terms etc but I'm trying. I've started low weight and feel I've got good guidance and am steadily progressing at weights I am happy with. I can feel my limit.
    I have put more space between the grip and this does seem to have help somewhat so thanks for advice there.
    I get the same pop and cracking on my shoulders at the front when doing lateral raises :( I hope I'm not too old for this and I'm slowly falling apart? I only feel about 25 :(
     
  8. Janie

    Janie TID Lady Member

    May 8, 2014
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    Thanks TG will definitely look into those :)
     
  9. dallas

    dallas Senior Member

    May 23, 2014
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    Attack me if you need to attack someone. She trains with me. Proper form is what i'm concentrating on at the moment and not so much the weight (although we are logging it now).

    Advice of not using free weights ????? as we all know free weights are the best. Upright rows semi advanced move ???? PPHHHT its just another move.

    We did a wider grip a few days ago and it seemed to help somewhat :^)
     
    BrotherIron and IronSoul like this.
  10. sassy69

    sassy69 TID Lady Member

    Aug 16, 2011
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    Shush! Your body was designed to be used! If you fail to use it, it will fail you.

    "Its a misconception that age makes you old." ... "Age is a state of mind."



    As mentioned above, there's no "one way" to do any particular exercise. Find the way that feels best. Upright rows are inherently a bit awkward and particularly puts an extreme angle/stretch on the wrists that you don't really find in most other exercises. Also try different bar configurations - the EZ bar has been my go-to for any two-handed lifts.

    The guy doing the report in the video continues to discuss how there are actual aging processes that occur and it isn't just a case of mind over matter. I'm pushing 49 this year and I am experiencing some issue which is directly due to and somewhat expected as a part of perimenopause. But also keep in mind that I peaked in competitive bodybuilding at age 45 and only did my first competition at age 35. I've been lifting for decades, but there is literally never a time when you are "too old" to resistance train. There is documented amazing increase in muscle mass for sedentary old people who started curling soup cans.

    https://www.buckinstitute.org/buck-news/exercise-reverses-aging-human-skeletal-muscle

    I can find you a host of other stories & videos about 70+ male & female bodybuilders, who just got started, or who have been doing it for years. Doesn't matter. The point is to start somewhere. You'd be amazed how quickly results do start to come, but you have to start somewhere and just go thru the process of getting to know your body. Don't look at 38 as "old" - trust me, it's not. I did most of my best competition between 40-45.

    That said - w/ your note about the cracking and popping in your shoulders as well - are you doing any warm up prior to lifting? Particularly if you're starting from a place of not much physical activity, you more than likely have some general mobility issues. Another point to acknowledge in general about weight lifting - the first places that usually go to shit are shoulders, elbows and wrists. One of the main reasons is simply repetitive motion. This is just part of the modern life, so give consideration to that - your joints arent' just now being used for weight lifting - they have potentially had several years of just simple repetitive motion. I know where my tendonitis came from but I have friends who have issues who have never walked into a gym.

    Here's a couple quick articles about "popping and cracking joints":

    http://www.hopkinsortho.org/joint_cracking.html
    http://www.healthcentral.com/osteoarthritis/c/240381/143712/crackle/

    Here's a couple articles / videos on ways to deal w/ popping and cracking joints - even if the article is about, e.g. knees, the suggestions they give apply to any joint - correct form, warm up appropriately, strengthen the muscles around the joint to enable the whole interface to work more like it was designed to work, mobility work, etc.

    http://stronglifts.com/10-tips-to-stop-your-knees-from-popping-and-cracking/
    http://www.zentofitness.com/the-importance-of-joint-mobility/
    http://www.dancespirit.com/2012/09/snap-crackle-pop/



    As I've hit "that age" when hormone changes will start causing particularly joint issues and less ability to recover, the root of all my issues is the inherent push/pull imbalances that I was born with. Most of it is just simply the structure of my body and the muscles that are naturally more or less dominant than others. And then throw in a little additional bias due to decades of weight lifting around these various imbalances. And there's no quicky fix to this stuff - its like a car - you need to do appropriate maintenance on it - take it out for a drive to keep things flowing, don't let the crud build up around your wheel wells, change the oil regularly, make sure there are no compromised o-rings, etc. The warm-ups and mobiity work will help you with those things that sound a little off, as if you were starting a race car cold and expecting to do sprint race. You might get away with it a couple times, but if you want to continually improve vs injure something, give appropriate consideration to getting everything warmed up and stretched.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2016
  11. dallas

    dallas Senior Member

    May 23, 2014
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    good post sassy69. And "yes" she duz warm up mate. The only problem she has is the shoulder and wrist problems she mentioned. Im not a doctor so couldn't give her advice as I wouldn't want to worsen things, so she thought you guys might of experienced it and be able to put some light on the situation ? going to try dumbbell's for upright rows next time though. But as she can do upright rows with a wider grip, she might be able to drop lateral raises (they hurt her shoulder joints) as wide upright rows hit the lateral delt anyhow.
     
  12. Janie

    Janie TID Lady Member

    May 8, 2014
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    Thank you for taking the time to reply and offer advice folks it's really appreciated. I'm really ashamed I have wasted like 22 years neglecting my body when I could have been fit all those years. I am so glad I have my husband and his family now to motivate and guide me to a more healthy lifestyle.
    I've never been over weight but have never been fit either and I had a baby 12 months ago and my body didn't carry her as well as it did in my twenties and I've ended up chubby with a horrid tummy and extra fat in places I've never had fat before lol!
    It's prompted me to do something about it . I have young face but my body is looking far from a good match I would hope I can get some good results soon and look better as a whole.
    I hope I can do an impressive before and after photo this time next year.
    It's a big change for me all this so I expect this won't be the only problem that shows up.
    I also really have to get a grip of healthy eating "I'm not going to say dieting" I need to shift some weight so I can see the results !
     

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