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Baby Formula?

BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
2,185
665
What are the alternatives for using baby formula, besides wet nursing, diluted cow's , goat's milk?....

Can pureed food that contains the appropriate profile of nutrients work?....

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Rock Diesel

Rock Diesel

Member
Mar 16, 2022
87
73
I have no idea. Becoming a parent is supposed to be such a wonderful happy time. I feel bad for everyone having to endure this nightmare right now. I've seen new parents on the baby formula isle at several stores recently looking completely distraught. It's sad our country has come to this.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

TID Board Of Directors
Sep 21, 2011
1,071
998
I would try to preach to most moms who just had an infant, sooner the better, to latch their infant on to the breast for breast milk. If they start it right away, or not lonmg after the infant is born, they will get their breastmilk production going....the more feedings = more stimulation for breast milk. If the infant is a month or 2 old RIGHT NOW during this mess, I would encourage the moms to see a breast feeding lactitioner (CLC, IBCLC) to try and get their milk production going, if it is possible. Again, this is right now during this current crisis. The longer they go without breastfeeding the harder it will be. The current recommendations encourage infant to hold off until 6 months for solid food introduction. If the parents are having a hard time finding formula, I would ignore these recommendations and continue with the older recommendations at 4 months. The only reason why they changed from 4 to 6 months was that there was a higher correlation of infants being overfed when solids were introduced at 4 months compared to 6 months, which led to some research showing that the infants had a higher risk of becoming obese later as they got older. At this point, that is a moot point, since formula is not stocked. This will obviously vary geographically.

I'd say the most vulnerable time for infants are between birth and around 4 months. After 4 months of age, especially 6+ months, they can rely more on infant solid foods for their calories. I would avoid giving fresh milk until close to a year, due to possible milk protein allergies due to a less developed GI tract.

The other population at risk are those on special formulas for infants with serious health conditions, milk protein allergies, and toddlers with rare nutrient-genetic disorders.

To my understanding, it was only ABBOTT that was shut down by the FDA? Abbott makes Similac formulas. That means MeadJohnson, who makes Enfamil, and Nestle factories are still in production and selling formulas. I am not sure how these other manufacturers are effected during this period? That said, I know they were not shut down by the FDA like Abbot was. So unless your infant was being fed Similac products, all the rest should still be out there. NOW.....with Similac production not at full capacity, there will be a higher demand for the other manufacturers, so there could still be a an issue with product availability, not counting hoarders. Enfamil and Similac compete against each other for sales, so they make identical products for the parents to switch their infants to, if they can be found.

I keep seeing people tell others to get products from their physician or through insurance, but that only will help a small percentage of families. First, docotrs will have samples, but i'm sure they run out due to the current demand. Also, if Abbott is not in production, the doctors will not be stocked either.

Out here in California, it is very very rare for a private insurance to cover formula....trust me, i've worked with them on this issue. The other insurances.....Straight Medi-Cal, Kern Family Health Care, and Health Net ONLY cover PRESCRIPTION formulas for certain medical diagnoses. An infant that does not have a medical diagnosis will not be covered. In most cases, Straight Medi-Cal is only active for the first 2 months, at which point, the family needs to apply for either Health Net or Kern Family Health Care, which are different forms of Medi-Cal themselves. I will tell you, Health Net is MUCH more difficult to work with, and much more strict on what they medically will cover through medical diagnoses. MIND you, these are also only low-income insurance. Therefore, if you do not qualify for either insurance, you will have other private insurance, which will 99% of the time, NOT cover infant formulas. I've seen infants dying from cancer and other critical illnesses not covered through private insurances.

Also, when it comes to any insurance covering medical diagnosed formulas, the doctors have to frequently send in their doctor's notes, showing the medical need for the formula to be covered........Failure to thrive, prematurity, etc, etc. They have to also provide the growth charts. Most doctors/pediatricians are super lazy on this. Some are very good. So it depends on the physician as well. The physicians provide the notes, ICD-10 diagnosed coding, etc......then they have their medical assistants do the rest....such as gathering the paperwork, and faxing it all to the insurances. Sometimes, if it is low income, they will fax it to a WIC office for them to submit the paperwork. That said, most insurances like to work with the doctor's office directly....they have got very strict on this.

They also have to note an amount (ounces) to be covered by the insurance, and at 6months of age for the infant, there is a certain amount that will only be covered (due to intro to solids) or the insurance, and if not provided, then the insurance will deny coverage. The first 6 months are easier to have the insurance to cover the formula. From 6+ months additional notes need to be created and sent to the insurance....i'll refrain from all the technical jibberish. If they are able to introduce solids, assuming they are not severely premie, then the insurance will demand a trial run be met, which is understandable. If solids are tolerated, the insurance will cover less formula, unless stated by the physician.

This brings us to 1 year. At 1 year of age, for 99% of the medical diagnoses, the insurance will not cover INFANT formula for the 1yr toddler. In addition to that, unless the child is super critical, the insurance will usually deny coverage of any formula. There are a few instances they will cover the formula, but the physician really needs to send in sufficient notes with those ICD-10 codes that are covered. If an infant can tolerate fresh milk, then they should advance to it, or soy milk if a milk protein allergy is present. Fresh milk has way more calories and nutrients for growth than baby formula, but some parents think there is some kind of special reason the infant needs infant formula when it is not needed.

A nurse, dietitian, and NICU physician should initiate coverage at birth if a special formula is needed. Once the infant is discharged from the hospital, the new pediatrician needs to submit new paperwork, or it will be denied after 2 months when their straight medi-cal coverage is discontinued. So the parents need to be notified of that....that they need to choose a new plan, which is either a private insurance, or one of the 2 medi-cal substituents of Health Net or KFHC.

Also, again, I am 100% PRO-breastfeeding, it is so much better than infant formula. That said, infant formula isn't bad for you like some of these hardcore BF nazi supporters like to preach. Breastmilk is better though, has so many additional growth factors, and immune system nutrients in it. It is also way more easily tolerated on the infant's GI tract. Most infants do not have a well-developed GI tract the first 6 months up to a year, so that is why they are at more risk for allergies. So there also needs to be a good support system from the family and friends for the mother. You'd be amazed at some of these old school boyfriends and husbands not being supportive of this, and many get jealous (usually Latino and Indian populations). I will tell you that there is a huge decline in African American mothers who breastfeed as well, which is sad because their infants tolerate BM much easier than the formulas.

There is also the breastmilk banks that can be looked into as well. Breastmilk can be froze and supplied to the infant later on.

And in case it wasn't emphasized above....infants, especially 6+ moths of age need to start relying more on solid infant foods, so less formula will be needed, which will help right now with it being not as available. Mom's who are breastfeeding should not cut back on BF or pumping, or they can lose their milk supply much easier, due to less hormonal stimulation to produce the breastmilk. They need to keep pumping and freezing.

I should note that moms who breastfeed, that both KFHC and Health Net also, in most cases, will supply electric breast pumps for the moms. For private insurances it is harder, but they can always try to run it through them to see if it can be covered. These pumps do not have to be returned, they can keep them. Worst case scenario is that the mom gets a manual pump, which are still efficient. Some moms actually prefer the manual pumps because they are more in control and it gives a stronger suction. The electric pumps covered from the insurance need to also have doctor's notes and the breastfeeding ICD-10 codes submitted, in order for them to be covered.

I've made this way too long, I bet most will scroll past it, but parents can also check their food banks in town as well.
 
Last edited:
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

TID Board Of Directors
Sep 21, 2011
1,071
998
One additional note....

If the infant's formula is covered through insurance, it will either be shipped to their home, or it the parents will need to pick it up from a pharmacy that they or the doctor chooses. THAT pharmacy will need to continue to keep in contact with the pediatrician office, and vice-versa, for things to continue to be covered. So it's a joint effort on the parents, the pharmacy, and the physician to supply what the insurance needs to process and be covered. If not, it will not be covered.

Again, this is usually only the case for low-income families who qualify for KFHC or Health Net out here in California. California is much different than most other states, so it will vary...sometimes hugely on insurance coverage.

Also, if they are low-income, they can go to WIC. WIC will help process the coverage, but it will still come down to the doctor submitting the appropriate notes needed to process through the insurance and back to the pharmacy to be dispensed. ONLY if the formula is denied, from the appropriate notes submitted from the physician to insurance, will WIC usually cover the prescription formula. WIC will need an updated prescription on file as well....in addition to notes at 6 months giving permission to offer solids. They also only cover formulas that they have a contract with, and even then it is limited.

If you are not low-income, and have private insurance, you will almost always never get your formula covered, even most of the time with prescription formulas, unless the physician knows the ins-and-outs of the private insurance and what they need to do to submit the appropriate notes for it to be covered. Again, they will not cover any of the non-prescription formulas. So if the infant is healthy and not premature, either WIC or the parents will need to buy the formula.....hence the breastfeeding option being not only 'better,' but cheaper.

All this is moot if the formula is not on the shelves, which again, I would say the first 4 months is most critical.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

TID Board Of Directors
Sep 21, 2011
1,071
998
Sorry...one more thing.

Most people plan when to have their kids, at least responsible people do. I'm not counting rape and stuff, obviously. I would say to be careful right now and really think about whether a child is important at this time. If YOU are able to afford the child, then by all means, have at it. If you are broke and living off the government, then please....stop having kids! Use birth control, condoms, and stop spreading your legs and being irresponsible. It should not be tax-payers jobs to pay for your child if you can't provide for it. And again, we do because we are a giving nation, but stop taking advantage of it and expecting us to pay for your multiple kids. RIGHT NOW people need to really think this over and be more responsible about bringing a child into the world because of the recession and infaltion and higher costs. If you can wait to have one, it will be best, if you are not able to afford it then wait or be more careful. Think about what is needed to pay for this child ahead of time.

Mind you most of us are also having a hard time paying for our own shit....stop being irresponsible and selfish. Wait for the best time if possible.

Unless you are on your final years of age to have a child, just wait until a better time presents itself....if you can't pay for it yourself.

And i'm not for abortion either, unless it's rape and shit, so be responsible. ***whole different topic i'm not trying to go down with these posts, lol.
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
2,185
665
Thank you for the feed guy's!!!....

The baby in question (my granddaughter) is 10 months old...She has been on enfamil...Her mother breast fed for a week and then dried up....I found out that she (granddaughter) is on baby food....My daughter was supplementing with enfamil...

I was told that target and pediatricians should have it as well?...However, supposedly can only buy ONE CAN at a time?....Again, thank you for input!!!!....

.
 
MR. BMJ

MR. BMJ

TID Board Of Directors
Sep 21, 2011
1,071
998
Thank you for the feed guy's!!!....

The baby in question (my granddaughter) is 10 months old...She has been on enfamil...Her mother breast fed for a week and then dried up....I found out that she (granddaughter) is on baby food....My daughter was supplementing with enfamil...

I was told that target and pediatricians should have it as well?...However, supposedly can only buy ONE CAN at a time?....Again, thank you for input!!!!....

.
The pediatricians 'may' have some sample cans, but it will depend on the availability at the stores, and if it's low, then many other parents are probably hitting up the doctors' offices as well.....so it may or may not be in stock with them too.

What type of Enfamil is she using? If it's easier, what color is her cans?

Yes, she is in a better situation since she is able to increase her solid foods at least for many of her feedings. If she has no allergies, then she may be able to tolerate fresh milk a few weeks sooner. It's not like at exactly the day they turn 1 year old their GI tract is all of a sudden matured for cow's fresh milk......that day. If she is feeding good, Yogurts may be a good stepping stone as well. She can have more than one person go in and get cans separately to help out if needed....not that I promote hoarding......but:)
 
BackAtIt

BackAtIt

MuscleHead
Oct 3, 2016
2,185
665
The govt knew about this for almost 6 months and did nothing. They don't give a shit about kids.

Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk

How's it goes, CEO?...Haven't seen u online in awhile....Everything ok?..

.
 
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