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Adequan or Aflutop?

mugzy

mugzy

Administrator
Staff Member
Aug 11, 2010
4,794
1,662
#1
Im not sure if I have a rotator cuff injury or just inflamed tendons in my shoulder. Bench pressing is becoming an issue and painfull. I was wondering if anybody has experience using Adequan or Aflutop to help treat this type of injury?
 
big_paul_ski

big_paul_ski

MuscleHead
Dec 13, 2010
2,374
349
#2
Im not sure if I have a rotator cuff injury or just inflamed tendons in my shoulder. Bench pressing is becoming an issue and painfull. I was wondering if anybody has experience using Adequan or Aflutop's to help treat this type of injury?
do you think you could have bursitis?
 
SHINE

SHINE

MuscleHead
Oct 11, 2010
5,047
599
#4
SHINE

SHINE

MuscleHead
Oct 11, 2010
5,047
599
#5
Correspondence and reprint requests to:
Dr Imad W Uthman, American University of Beirut Medical Centre, PO Box: 113–6044, Hamra, 1103 2090, Beirut, Lebanon;
[email protected]
The medical literature was reviewed from 1968–2002 using Medline and the key words "intra-articular" and "osteoarthritis" to determine the various intra-articular therapies used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are the most frequently used intra-articular therapies in osteoarthritis. Other intra-articular substances such as orgotein, radiation synovectomy, dextrose prolotherapy, silicone, saline lavage, saline injection without lavage, analgesic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucosamine, somatostatin, sodium pentosan polysulfate, chloroquine, mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester, lactic acid solution, and thiotepa cytostatica have been investigated as potentially therapeutic in the treatment of arthritic joints. Despite the lack of strong, convincing, and reproducible evidence that any of the intra-articular therapies significantly alters the progression of osteoarthritis, corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are widely used in patients who have failed other therapeutic modalities for lack of efficacy or toxicity. As a practical approach for a knee with effusion, steroid injections should be considered while the presence of symptomatic "dry" knees may favour the hyaluronic acid approach. The virtual absence of serious side effects, coupled with the perceived benefits, make these approaches attractive.


Interactions of pentosan polysulfate with cartilage matrix proteins and synovial fibroblasts derived from patients with osteoarthritis.

Ghosh P, Hutadilok N.

Raymond Purves Bone and Joint Research Laboratories (University of Sydney),Royal North Shore Hospital of Sydney St. Leonards, NSW, Australia.

Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) has been shown to improve symptoms of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) when studied under double-blinded conditions. Laboratory studies indicated that this drug exhibits multiple actions, including the preservation of articular cartilage (AC) proteoglycans in animal models of OA and the stimulation of hyaluronan synthesis by synovial fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. As PPS is strongly anionic and has a molecular weight of approximately 5700 Da its ability to enter connective tissues rich in proteoglycans and interact with the resident cells has been questioned. In the present studies, experiments were undertaken to isolate and characterize proteins in human AC which have the potential to bind PPS. Thrombospondin was identified in 4.0 M GuHCl extracts of human AC as a PPS-binding protein. Furthermore, synovial fibroblasts derived from OA joints were shown to secrete thrombospondin and also bind PPS. Using bovine erythrocytes conjugated with PPS a rosetting of the synovial fibroblast could be demonstrated. The level of rosetting was not affected by pre-incubating cultures with thrombospondin antibody suggesting that PPS was interacting directly with the cells. Kinetic studies of 3H-PPS uptake by synovial fibroblasts showed saturation of binding sites within 30 min when cells were maintained at 4 degrees C but preservation of drug uptake for up to 120 min when cells were cultured at 37 degrees C. These data, together with the finding that cells labeled with drug at 37 degrees C showed higher incorporation, than at 4 degrees C after trypsin digestion suggests that PPS first binds to the cell membrane when at 37 degrees C is internalized, possibly by pinocytosis.

PMID: 8731395 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Chondroprotective Drugs
Adequan® is polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG),made from an extract of cow lung and trachea that is then sulfated. The result is a large, charged molecule composed of galactosamine, glucosamine, and hexuronic acid. After administration, PSGAG binds to cartilage components. The precise mechanism of action of PSGAG in joints is unknown, but there are many studies demonstrating a beneficial effect of this product on damaged joints. Currently, PSGAG is thought to decrease destructive enzymes, act as an anti-inflammatory agent, and stimulate the normal production of hyaluronan and glycosaminoglycan. Adequan® is indicated for the treatment of degenerative joint diseases. In the US and Canada, Adequan is approved for use in dogs at 4.4 mg/kg IM twice weekly for four weeks. Although not approved, some practitioners use it in cats at 5–10 mg/cat IM. “Maintenance” therapy is not addressed by the manufacturer and has not been investigated in scientific studies, but veterinary practitioners have administered additional doses at intervals of weekly or monthly intervals with success in horses, dogs, and cats. Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan is related to the anti-clotting drug, heparin, and has some similar effects on blood clotting in horses. Although bleeding tendencies have been seen in people, prolonged administration of PSGAG in horses and dogs does not cause clinically apparent bleeding problems. It is probably best not to use PSGAG concurrently with aspirin in small animals.
Pentosan polysulfate is similar to polysulfated glycosaminoglycans (Adequan®),except that it is derived from beechwood hemicellulose rather than an animal product. The veterinary brand Cartrophen Vet® has similar anti-inflammatory action as Adequan®, but it is a less expensive product for dogs and is used extralabel in cats in Canada. Cartrophen Vet® is not available in the United States at this time, but the manufacturer is seeking approval in the US.
Pentosan is approved for use in women as Elmiron® for the treatment of interstitial cystitis (IC),as it is thought that a deficiency of the protective glycosaminoglycan layer in the bladder allows diffusion of irritating substances in urine. Inflammation of the bladder wall is thought to cause the clinical symptoms. Elmiron is an orally bioavailable pentosan that is thought to adhere to the bladder surface and supplement the natural glycosaminoglycan layer. Elmiron® is available in the US and Canada as a gelatin capsule and dosed in women at 100 mg PO q8h. In humans it has a urinary excretion t½ of 4.4 hours and is completely eliminated in 144 hours. Because this is a chronic, waxing and waning disease, pentosan must be given to women for a minimum of eight weeks to determine efficacy. Pentosan appears to be a possible treatment for IC in cats. The Elmiron® product is expensive (approximately $1/capsule) and it may be difficult to reformulate the capsule for a dose for a cat. Anecdotally, the canine product Cartrophen Vet® appears safe and effective in treating some cases of feline IC. The recommended dose for treatment of canine musculoskeletal pain and inflammation with Cartrophen Vet® is 3 mg/kg SC for a total of four injections, five to seven days apart. This dose has been widely used in cats in Canada, both for musculoskeletal problems and IC. Maintenance therapy is titrated to the individual patient, and some cats require monthly injections.
Pentosan is a heparin-like compound but its anticoagulant activity is weak (1/15 the activity of heparin). It has been available as a human product in Europe for over 30 years, with few adverse reactions. There are rare reports of bleeding complications in the human literature, so it probably should not be administered to cats who are on aspirin therapy or who are about to undergo surgery. The most commonly reported adverse effects in women are gastrointestinal discomfort, skin reactions and headache. No adverse reactions have been reported to the author from its use in cats.
 
Rider

Rider

TID Board Of Directors
Aug 27, 2010
1,338
604
#6
Aflutop, I've used it. It worked amazing for my joints. Getting old's a bitch, but I really enjoyed aflutop to ease those joint aches.
 
jdjack

jdjack

MuscleHead
Sep 22, 2010
568
32
#7
Make sure you're stretching and icing POST-workout. You may find something that helps, but if you don't stretch and ice post-workout, then you're really not doing everything you can to help it from coming back.
 
AllTheWay

AllTheWay

TID Lady Member
Mar 17, 2011
4,240
411
#8
i use adequan all the time! it is awesome stuff! almost cant over do the stuff. pentosan is everywhere now in the veterinary market, atleast from the compounders. stuff burns like hell and i didnt think it helped more than the adequan did. the adequan burns for 2 mins and then its done. you inject it every 3 days for a series of 7 shots and then monthly. wonderful stuff.
 
trentracks

trentracks

TID Board Of Directors
Apr 23, 2011
1,044
253
#9
I would get on egay and get some Alflutop,try that,then if that does nothing I would go get the horses doses of Adequan and try that
 
BrotherIron

BrotherIron

TID Board Of Directors
Mar 6, 2011
10,407
2,625
#10
Don't know if you do any rehab or prehab work but you may want to look more into that as well. I had a severe injury to my left shoulder and thanks to working with a sports PT I am just about fully recovered and I didn't end up having to take anything or get cut.
 
AllTheWay

AllTheWay

TID Lady Member
Mar 17, 2011
4,240
411
#11
I would get on egay and get some Alflutop,try that,then if that does nothing I would go get the horses doses of Adequan and try that
dont need to do a whole horse dose. in people the recommended glucosamine injection dose is 100mg per injection while the horse dose is 500mg. i take 250mg for each one. the injectable does is significantly lower than the oral dose as orally it is a huge compound and most of it isnt absorbed.
 
mugzy

mugzy

Administrator
Staff Member
Aug 11, 2010
4,794
1,662
#12
There is some great info in this post. I came acoss some Adequan this week and will be giving this a try soon. Im looking forward to being able to train the should area a bit heavier again. How long before I begin to see the benefits of the Adequan?
 
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